Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Thank you Michael, I did a little digging and found out the Korg stick is a syncrosoft product. The same company Cubase uses. The stick should be compatible with other companies that used the protocol also refrred to as an eliscenser. sycrosoft…"
May 20, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Michael, Can you tell me if I can use an old Korg usb stick for the licenses? I was cleaning and found it the other day. No longer needed for Korg because they went to a different validation scheme that no longer uses the the dongle.
Seems I…"
May 20, 2019
Dane Aubrun replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Consoling and thank you for the assurances. I've had a USB stick go defunct and got obsessive about back-ups. I do 2 of the DAW and Vienna samples. As it is, I can do a software license with EW but have no free slots for a drive to hold the samples,…"
May 20, 2019
Dane Aubrun replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"That Vienna key comes with a helluvan overhead. If you lose it or break it during the guarantee period you have to buy your licenses again at 20 Euros per license. It's only guaranteed against failure. To avoid re-buying the licenses, Vienna offers…"
May 17, 2019
Bob Porter replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Yes, a usb stick with a two year warranty. $26.If you loose the stick after that, I assume you can buy another. Same in the case of a hardware crash or theft. I suppose there are a few advantages, but not many. 
Timothy a powered hub is always best.…"
May 17, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Dane, I believe the sample library companies biggest customers are Television/movie/video game/advertisement composers. I could be wrong, but I don't think I am. For every successful movie composer there are likely 1000 or more wanna be's. I don't…"
May 17, 2019
Bob Porter replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Just my opinion, but a usb key is about the silliest thing I've heard of. Not that I'm advocating their use, but there are cracks out there. I hope the libraries that use these keys are well worth the hassle of yet another thing sticking out of your…"
May 17, 2019
Dane Aubrun replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"I've wondered what the difference is between "cinematic" and symphonic sample libraries - though I suppose "cinematic" has a better selling pitch. There must be lots of wannabe cinema composers out there. Well, they aspire to compose so why not?…"
May 16, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"I've heard good things about Vienna. I was hesitant because you need a dongle. Not a deal breaker. Mainly I'm running out of usb ports. Most composers who liked Spitfire also liked Vienna. If I see a deal I might look at their libs in the future.…"
May 16, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Good to meet another CbB user here!  Yes, it will be interesting to see how the future develops over there. So long as scook and Craig and a few others stay around questions will be answered.  Since Gibson let Craig go I think he's migrated more…"
May 15, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Michael, Yes I see you over on the Cakewalk forum on occasion. Good to see you here! It is a nice program. You've also used the program when it was 599.00 correct?  Differences are it lacks some of the third party plugins that the older version had,…"
May 15, 2019
Gavin Brown replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Just a quick mention of something - if anyone on this thread has a publisher who purchases their work based on recorded samples (w/ or w/o score), please contact me, I have an idea I'd like to discuss with you - "
May 15, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"I ended up buying the Spitfire Albion One library. Time will tell if I will use it. I hear good reviews on it as the sort of "staple" library from Spitfire. We'll see.
I had to buy another SSD to store it on since it's like 55gb compressed and 80gb…"
May 15, 2019
Ingo Lee replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"@Timothy, thanks, I'll keep an eye on it, I'm in no hurry at this point.

@Dane Have you considered MuseScore? I don't use it but people like it and it's free and it will export pdf I understand. Dane Aubrun said:
I was thinking about publishing…"
May 15, 2019
Dane Aubrun replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"I was thinking about publishing software and it seems to have the things I look for (provisionally) but it must be pretty damned expensive. I waded through masses of hype but....nowhere the price mentioned. 
I'm not really interested in sounds or…"
May 14, 2019
Timothy Smith replied to Doug Lauber's discussion Choose Your Best Samples
"Ingo I don't think Dorico goes on sale for a few more weeks. Not sure how reliable this info is. I received it second hand."
May 14, 2019
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  • Hi Doug,

    Thanks for the comment a nice analysis of my music LOL...

    Anyway, it might surprise you to know that I am in no way influenced by John Coolidge Adams. My approach and concept of dealing with rhythm and repetitive approach comes from more of a cultural view (and I don't just mean cultural rhythm cycles) enhanced by compositional techniques. This is also true with my way of "layering" which is huge trademark of mine.
    Actually, some of my methods of overlapping phrases/phrase lengths and "turns" of phrases can be attributed to my studying under John Clement Adams.


    Actually, its quite an involved explanation as to what my approach is compositionally. Maybe at some point if you are interested we can have a good ole chat about it lol.

    I think you were lambasted for starting a discussion about the importance of rhythm simply because most people don't understand "rhythm" and "rhythmic concepts". In Western Music/Western Cultures it is not the concept of rhythm that drives form and structure and so what rhythm is, how it functions and its place is really a new kind of discussion in comparision to discussion of harmony and melody.

    Actually, I feel that composers like Adams experimented with what they understood as rhythmic concepts as a way to understand even more and hoping that the listener would be engaged in trying to also understand rhythm more through the experiementation.

    I will say that, it was refreshing to see your statment about the "misuse of rhythm" as a "glaring defect". Every now and then, I come across music where a composer is trying to use rhythm as the driving force for the work but he/she seems inept when it comes to execution and the attempt almost comes across as silly.
  • Thanks H.

    I think much of your work has a post-minimalist feeling to it.
    It's interesting- the way you overlap instruments or groups
    of instruments in ways that create mystery and anticipation.
    These group seem to operate in ways that feel both
    automated and independent from each other. You use a
    working strategy of rhythm that does remind me of John C Adams
    -Coolidge, but I've never heard Clement, so can't detect his
    influence on you. Your overlapping phrase lengths are
    interesting often (thankfully) surprising.

    I was lambasted for starting a discussion about the
    Importance of Rhythm, but I have to say that in some of your
    music I do hear an approach to Rhythm that is similar to
    Adams.(always interesting) It is sort of a rhythm that reflects our mechanized society, in that it can function in an automatic way. The automatic quality can be setup using formulas of repetition that I'm sure
    you are aware of, and can be countered and complemented
    by using opposing strategies, often simultaneously. Like Adams,
    you music often has a quality of directional ambiguity, which
    I like- ...hey, real life is like that. What is around the next corner?

    Where is the tonal center? You make definitive statements and
    those are balanced by ambiguities. At times there are extreme
    complexities that feel purposeful because of the underlying logic
    and structure. I feel satisfied when you suddenly shift to
    a clarity and simplicity of emotion. But, your work is not simple.
    It's impressive.
  • Hi Doug,
    Thanks for stopping by. You have some pretty interesting music on your page as well.

    I was surprised to read that you heard the influence of "Adams". Although our styles are completely different, and as I did not take from him stylistically in sounds of harmony and tonality I did take from him the understanding of a number of concepts and techniques. However, I must make sure we are both talking about the same "Adams"? My teacher was John C. Adams (John Clement Adams) and not John (Coolidge) Adams. My teacher is well known but he is not the minimalist.

    If you google John Clement Adams should be able to find out more about him if you are interested.

    By the way, to satisfy my curiosity if you were thinking of the minimalist "Adams" I'm curious as to what you found in my style that was similar to him.
  • you sometimes get that - I then try it with another computer and it works fine. Puzzling. You can find a lo-fi MP3 of it here. I'm not religious BTW, but I just felt like doing a hymn !

    http://4praise.com/cgi-bin/files/mp3/5620.mp3
  • do you mean pieces 2 and 3 on the music player on my page ?
  • Doug

    Thanks man....I really appreciate your vote of confidence on the intermezzo. Honestly...I am very happy with the piece as well..the trick behind it was applying late romantic piano school techniques (Brahms, Schummann) into modern chord spellings and alterations to add strong color to the modulations..No CD yet since I have to finish it....I am working on the final measures and should have it wrapped up hopefully before the end of the Month. I should have the piece published by then
    As far as the quality of the recording....Its all Logic Pro Magic.. Once I notate it on Finale.I record it directly from my Yamaha digital, into Logic Pro and use open space designer (great tool -btw) to enhance the mood.....I tried using mikes from my other Yamaha grand...but the quality in an open room came out awful....so I am really happy with this process since I can internalize both the recording as well as quality of it.

    Thanks again

    Fernando
  • Thanks Per-Erik and Stephen. I may or may not keep all of those guitar parts. This movement is only 3 minutes long, but I feel it is a little bit too repetitious. I can create more variety with the addition of bass guitar, drums, and saxophone, so we will see how it sounds in a later version. Sunday, I will begin work on a 2nd Movement that will probably use mostly orchestral instrumentation, but with surprising infusions of elec guitar, synth, etc.
  • Hey, you are welcome. Thanks, I agree that my music has a lot of potential.
    Electronic effects? These are just synthesized sounds. My synthesizer of choice is the Clavia Nord Modular (classic). An example would be the continuous raspy sound that slowly evolves in the background of Hank Searches X. The Modular uses a PC XP editor to design patches. There are also thousands of patches free on the internet for this synth. I believe the odd mechanical sound at the beginning of Separation Anxiety, was an Acid loop. I am selling my Nord Modular Micro, for $350, including the software. (I upgraded to the same unit, but keyboard version.) Many synths, and especially the Modular, are capable of producing very original sounds. Maybe I'll post a few of the patches I've invented. As far as developing compositions, that's an area I want to focus on. I'll probably extend the ideas of Equinox into a second movement which will use orchestral samples.
  • Hey Doug, thank you for the kind words! Great music on your page as well, I especially enjoyed Equinox!

    To answer your question: My favorite composers are Alan Menken, John Debney, John Powell and Hans Zimmer. I generally enjoy both classical and modern types of filmmusic.

    Happy composing! =)
  • Hi Doug ! and thanks for your words !
    I'll give a listen to your works as well, as soon as I'll be back home from the Christmas holidays :)
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