What Piece Drives You to Tears?

Hey everyone,

So with the exception of a couple Billy Joel ballads, I've come to realize that the only music that can really make a grown man like myself tear up is a moving orchestral piece. The sad thing is that for me, most circumstances in life (e.g heartbreak) really can't drive me to tears. I've never been much of a crier, but there are just some melodies and arrangements that break me down.

So I figured I'd ask all of you if anyone has had a similar emotional connection to a piece of music, whether it is from the sheer beauty of it all, or perhaps it brings back a painful memory from the past.

For me, Pietro Mascagni's Intermezzo from Cavelleria Rusticana does it...

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Replies

  • You're right, Ascend sounds heavenly yet a bit morbid like letting go. And I know we don't know each other, but I'm sorry about your Father. My condolences. I lost family to cancer, and I try my best not to smoke cigarettes so I can stay healthy myself. Cancer is terrible. Anyway, thanks for sharing.

    Dave Dexter said:

    The one piece I can think of that reliably makes me either have to quickly hit pause or do a sad is Brian Eno's "An Ending (Ascent)":


    I'd always been consumed on listening by the weird combination of serenity, hope and bitter sadness I hear in the piece, but it somehow became associated with my father as he slowly died of cancer. So a difficult listen these days.

    I also recommend these three by Steven Wilson for anyone who wants beautiful, haunting songs about death, loss and the acceptance thereof (with beautiful stop motion videos), all of which have broken me down at some time or another.
    https://youtu.be/sh5mWzKlhQY
    https://youtu.be/n8sLcvWG1M4
    https://youtu.be/ycYewhiaVBk

    Not much classical music makes me cry, not that it's bad if it doesn't, but the pieces I mention a lot on here are "Spem in Alium" and "Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis". Trust Tallis to hit the feels.

    What Piece Drives You to Tears?
    Hey everyone, So with the exception of a couple Billy Joel ballads, I've come to realize that the only music that can really make a grown man like m…
  • Gustav Malher "Adagietto"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Les39aIKbzE

    Samuel Barber :Adagio for strings"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izQsgE0L450



  • Darrell White II said:

    You're right, Ascend sounds heavenly yet a bit morbid like letting go. And I know we don't know each other, but I'm sorry about your Father. My condolences. I lost family to cancer, and I try my best not to smoke cigarettes so I can stay healthy myself. Cancer is terrible. Anyway, thanks for sharing.

    Dave Dexter said:

    The one piece I can think of that reliably makes me either have to quickly hit pause or do a sad is Brian Eno's "An Ending (Ascent)":


    I'd always been consumed on listening by the weird combination of serenity, hope and bitter sadness I hear in the piece

    _________________________

    I love this one too

    What Piece Drives You to Tears?
    Hey everyone, So with the exception of a couple Billy Joel ballads, I've come to realize that the only music that can really make a grown man like m…
  • IMO, I think you are all talking about the quality of the melodies you have heard. "Melody" is the element that is sadly neglected in much of commercial music, these days. I'm outraged by the Law And Order soundtracks, with the Mike Post not-quite-music soundtracks

    that are devoid of melodic content. 

    For me, Puccini was the master melody-maker. That aria, the Nessum Dorma, squeezes my heart as much as any of them, but all of the masters spun out great melodies.  It depends on which piece I listened to last.

  • Here is one that breaks my heart >

  • Thanks Gav for posting that, I liked it although it didn't affect me the same as you.  The score did make me curious;. groupings of 22 and 23 sixty-fourth notes, who hears that?  I ended up on this site:

    http://www.pennario.org/Pages/Composer/Leonard-Pennario-Midnight.html

    which has this original score supposedly as written by Pennario, with guitar diagrams even.

    8608599852?profile=originalApparently the complex piano part was improvised and never played the same way twice by Pennario. The score that appears in the video is a transcription by someone with a better ear than mine! Doris Day loved this and so it appeared in her movie 'Julie'. I love this stuff, thanks!

    Gav Brown said:

    Here is one that breaks my heart >

    Leonard Pennario - The Composer - Midnight On The Cliffs
    Leonard Pennario Composer
  • When faced with such a blizzard, I think as a performer you have to think of it in terms of the interval of time between the beginning note of a run, and the end note. Not the notes in the arpeggios, but the notes in the chords of the surrounding melody. If you have a whole note at the beginning of the run, then you have that much time to get the arpeggio crammed in until the next melodic note sounds, so if you play a run of 12, 15, or 23, then that’s notated as 12, 15, or 23 notes = 1 whole note. Of course it helps if you’re a virtuoso and a genius. I looked him up too and saw the same things you saw. I was hoping to find something else on par with this, but apparently this is his single masterpiece.
  • It's probably the last part of Barber's Knoxville Summer of 1915.

    I can't explain to myself why it should affect me. Leontyne Price's recording in particular brings me out in goosebumps. 

    .

    Then the closing scenes of West Side Story (the film).....

    .

  • Off topic for Gavin: I have belonged to this forum for awhile and would like to be able to find my way back to the home page to post new topics and see what other topics are there, but I've lost that bookmark. Can you help me?

  • For Art,

    https://composersforum.ning.com/

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