Hi,

This is the first movement of my double concert (15 min) for lute and classical guitar.

It is somewhat a mixed work of my previous and current approaches.  I had begun writing

it before beginning my study with Kamran İnce.  I decided to continue it although

a lot has changed in me...  It still has the discrepancies typical of my past anyway.

Comments are wellcome, of any type, of any genre.

 

Towards the Unknown Self is about the movement of humans towards west. Turks from central Asia to Anatolia or Americans from Europe to America...

The march towards the unknown lands ends not only at a new home country but also at a new identity, a new self...

Cheers.

Al

music: https://music.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_krxkF_oPkYjOz3ZE3dtjwvHdzE2i29wUY

score: Towards the unknown ver1_1.pdf

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Replies

  • Wow, very nice sounds.

    I am amazed by the sounds you created, you mentioned lute and guitar, but seems like I am hearing piano and horns as well.

    Beautiful and relaxing music.

    Rene

    • Hi  Rene,

      It is my typing mistake, sorry for that.  It is supposed to be a concerto for lute and guitar.  Horns exist for this reaon.  But piano, I do not know.

      Thank you for your interest.

      Al

  • I like this as well -- the strange pizz ostinato at the beginning and end is particularly effective. Looking forward to hearing the whole work.

    • Hi David,

      The pizz ostinato is created by computer generation.  It is a limited alleatory algorthm.  I created it with jfugue and JAVA, then imported it to  MuseSCORE.  I gave its final shape by hand in MuseSCORE.  I had to transfer it to Finale in order to use Garritan.

      As the title of the first movement is NATURE, the pizz ostinato is an imitation of rain drops...  By the way it is an ostinato without any repetitions like listening the rain.

      I appreciate your interest as always.

      Al

      • I realised that the ostinato had a constantly varying rhythm which is what made it so interesting. I hadn't guessed you used an aleatory algorithm

         

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