Classical music is dying.The fundamental problem is a lack of contemporary emotionally compelling compositions,because listeners get no emotional reward from most contemporary classical music ,orchestras are forced to repeat a small number of compositions from the distant past,and as each year passes the standard repertoire becomes less and less relevant to a contemporary listener.so the audience for classical music continues to shrink. traditional music education for composers is part of the problem engendering, snobbery ,elitism and a cold unemotional approach to music composition.l believe that the situation is so bad that only a movement from outside the traditional music institutions (l call this the deinstitutionalization of classical music)can save classical music from oblivion. ps .for more information on this topic go to my website http://www.onedarylsprakecomposer.com

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  • Tyler says: " Write the music you love to write, in accordance with your highest principles."....a concept with which I am in entire agreement. Whereas Ondib observes: "How does one measure the relevance of a new composition? I would suggest that music be subject to the following test. Look at YOUR latest composition and see if you can answer these questions: 

    "What problem does this music solve? 

    "What emotions does it evoke?

    "Are there other compositions that solve that problem or evoke those emotions more effectively?"

    Which to me is something of a mystery. Why does a composer have to solve a problem? I never sit down to compose a piece of music thinking 'Now what problem am I aiming to solve here?'. Perhaps someone would attempt to explain not only why a problem has to be identified but what, in precise musical terms, can be identified as a problem per se.

    It might help the process if I observe Bach's brilliance in solving what may be seen as a problem of how to write a mirror fugue for instance - now that (in my mind at least) is more of a mathematical problem than a purely musical one. When listening to much of Bach's output I find myself considering the complexity and brilliance of his mathematical genius but feel little or no emotion whatsoever. Listening to Bach and analysing his scores leaves me considering how amazing is the human brain to be able to achieve such complexity - and that's the only emotive element: amazement.

    Perhaps, as has been mooted many times before, music that can be enjoyed and appreciated produces in the listener a fine balance between emotional and intellectual satisfaction. The first element can be achieved through schmaltz the second by listening to a mirror fugue - to achieve a balance between those two elements is what I might refer to as 'a problem to be solved' when composing.

  • In my own compositions l try to fill in the gaps left by others.l see all music as one body of work,and l prefer not to replicate the emotional statements of others unless l think l can improve on them,anyway thats what l try to do.its not possible to be  alway successful.

  • Why post at all?

  • Perhaps that's why you're lonely, Goat!

    The Lonely Goat said:

    No one may call themself an "artist".

    It is for others to bestow such a title.

    In discussion, this place is weighted towards those prone to use "ostrich defense". That is why I now spend next to no time here.

    8608248688?profile=original

    the reason why classical music is dying
     Classical music is dying.The fundamental problem is a lack of contemporary emotionally compelling compositions,because listeners get no emotional re…
  • Indeed, Stephen. Goat (Ray) has lost sight of what the whole point of music is - joy.

  • I think that right wing governments throughout the world and throughout history have been hostile to the arts because the arts inspire in people prospects of a better life which means less profit for financial oligarchies whose puppets these governments are.

    There is a healthy demand in the market for arts in general and classical music in particular, but as other commentators have said, tickets are prohibitively expensive.

    Therefore, I think that all progressive powers (artists included) should campaign and lobby ever more vigorously for more democracy, (art and democracy being inseparable as always).

    A good start would be to demand from all governments to make (by legislative means) all rich people subsidize the arts whether they like it or not. Also to educate them that subsidizing the arts should be taken as an honor, exactly like their rich counterpart citizens considered it to be in Ancient Athens when they subsidized voluntarily the production of classical tragedies (but with the state guarantying to enforce such subsidizing if someone disagreed).

    That's what democracy its all about and no one can doubt the quality of its cultural products (Greek tragedies in this case).

    As for the current euro-greek tragedy, it looks like the powers of progress have won today's referendum!

    Good wishes to all.

  • To be entirely honest here, most tickets for classical works are not that expensive. The fee for a night of the state orchestra playing one of the usual pieces (let's say, some beethoven symphonies), is about 8 euros for the unemployed and students, and the most expensive option is something like 45 euros for the VIP zone (and 30 for a seat on the 3rd or 4th row). While I;d love it to be even cheaper, we shouldn't fool ourselves-people are paying more to see one man DJ with a laptop, mixing ready made playlists, boosting his reknown and taking advantage of it to generate ticket sales, or to see a 4 man band on stage. If anything, the orchestra is by nature a more expensive endeavor, since it's made up of many more musicians with a lot more official studies and hard work on their backs.

  • Stephen,

    I want to ask a personal favor from you.  Will you please watch the following video?  It is a 1957 video recording of Glenn Gould playing Bach's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No.1 with the Ottawa Philharmonic (conductor Thomas Mayer).

    Tell me about your emotive element and what about it really amazes you.  If you're still going to answer you're amazed at the complexity, mathematics, and such intellectual achievements, please do me a second personal favor and don't say anything, so I can remain peacefully imagining that you can see what truly is monumentally amazing in this video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfZHg9eH-WY&list=LLMYzOGE-HyHKM...

    Thank you in advance, and I hereby owe you one (or perhaps two...).  And I'm sorry to sound perhaps pedantic.  I don't mean it that way, I really just want you to try to listen to Bach's music in a different way, and this particular recording has (I think) the best chance of achieving that.

    Mariza

    Stephen Lines said:

    (...)

    It might help the process if I observe Bach's brilliance in solving what may be seen as a problem of how to write a mirror fugue for instance - now that (in my mind at least) is more of a mathematical problem than a purely musical one. When listening to much of Bach's output I find myself considering the complexity and brilliance of his mathematical genius but feel little or no emotion whatsoever. Listening to Bach and analysing his scores leaves me considering how amazing is the human brain to be able to achieve such complexity - and that's the only emotive element: amazement.

    (...)"

    - YouTube
    Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
  • Ah yes, just like all those fine democracies that gave us the beautiful works of the renaissance, or the classical era.  Oh wait...

    I don't know about where you live, but tickets here aren't any more expensive for classical performances than they are for pop ones.  I just don't see a huge amount of interest for classical among young people.  


    Socrates Arvanitakis said:

    I think that...

    Good wishes to all.


    the reason why classical music is dying
     Classical music is dying.The fundamental problem is a lack of contemporary emotionally compelling compositions,because listeners get no emotional re…
  • If you go to the digital concert hall (Berlin PO) and see the crowds especially open air concerts at the Waldbuhnne you might be forgiven for thinking that the symphony orchestra is not dead in Germany at least.
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