The Rain Forest

Well, my fierst offereing wasn't recieved well, so I thought I'd try again with a piece I wrote for a student from CIM (Cleveland Institute of Music). This is a joint venture with the Cleveland Composers Guild and CIM. Students are paired with members of the guild who write a piece for them under the tutelage of their private teacher. This piece was written in the Fall of 2008 for an 11 year pianist who performed it last May at CIM. This is a small 4 movement wotk for piano called: The Rain Forest. The student had just won an award for her school (and her team) for a project on saving the rain forest. It took First Place at Disney World of Orlando. Upon her return of accepting the award, she played this work.

 

MM I - The Rain Forest

 

MM II -  The Diversity of Life

 

MM III - Man's Intrusion

 

MM IV - Nature's Lament

 

I hope you enjoy these little pieces. Please drop a comment if you are so inclined.

 

Thank you,

Bill

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Replies

  • Thank you for sharing this. Very interesting works with brave usage of piano specifics. I like your Night Moods the best, it is like a beautiful fairy tale. Great work!
  • Thanks for listening Ray. This piece was performed live.

    Ray Kemp said:
    Bill,

    Nice pieces and considering there purpose very well thought out and performed.
    Is that the Garritan Steinway getting a hammering?

    Ray

    BTW don't be put off by the seeming lack of interest here. These two words together "music" and "dissection" sometimes bring out the worst in people but I'm in a good mood this evening :-)
  • Andrew thanks for listening. And what a nice iliteration - "Like a fairy tale" I guess dreaming does bring out that in our dreams. Again, thanks for the listen.

    Best regards,
    Bill

    Andrew Gleibman said:
    Thank you for sharing this. Very interesting works with brave usage of piano specifics. I like your Night Moods the best, it is like a beautiful fairy tale. Great work!
    The Rain Forest
    Well, my fierst offereing wasn't recieved well, so I thought I'd try again with a piece I wrote for a student from CIM (Cleveland Institute of Music)…
  • Although I'm all for there being no boundaries to musical expression, I do find this sort of music very hard to follow.

    In the absence of any traditional melody, harmony or form for the ear to latch on to, can you please give some guidelines about what to "listen out for" in this music. Should I let the music just "wash over me", or should there be things stand out ?

    I'm also not sure how the titles relate to the pieces - for example how is the last piece a "lament" as it doesn't sound either plaintive or mournful - it the title meant to be ironic ?

    I'm prepared to take another listen, but I just need some sense of direction in how to make music sense of the pieces before I can make any sort of emotional connection.
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  • Hi and thanks for the listen. The pieces were designed to be played by an 11 year old. They come from a much larger work called: For the Loss of Trees. I gave specific 'pictorial' suggestions to the young player so that she might "get into" the work.

    The first MM offers a 'mind's picture' of monkeys and birds playing, jumping, flitting around the rain forest trees. It is continued as the 'theme of the 2nd movement. No attempt was used for 'traditional form' rather the idea was to sound spontaneous and diverse.

    The thrid movement - 'Man's Intrusion' attempts to show the 'jocularity' of man as he interupts the playfullness of the tree creatures with his tractors and chain saws. I gave the student the image of a man totally unaware of the beuty and diversity all around him.

    The fourth movement may be mis-named, but it shows the anger of nature and fear of the disregard by man.

    I know it is difficult, but the excercise gave the student a chance to play some of the 20th century techniques for piano. The original 'For the Loss of Trees' is a two piano work of much larger proportions.

    Thanks for listening. I am not an 'easy listen. I've studied masters of the 21st century, with several composers of the Cleveland area.

    Adrian Allan said:
    Although I'm all for there being no boundaries to musical expression, I do find this sort of music very hard to follow.

    In the absence of any traditional melody, harmony or form for the ear to latch on to, can you please give some guidelines about what to "listen out for" in this music. Should I let the music just "wash over me", or should there be things stand out ?

    I'm also not sure how the titles relate to the pieces - for example how is the last piece a "lament" as it doesn't sound either plaintive or mournful - it the title meant to be ironic ?

    I'm prepared to take another listen, but I just need some sense of direction in how to make music sense of the pieces before I can make any sort of emotional connection.
    The Rain Forest
    Well, my fierst offereing wasn't recieved well, so I thought I'd try again with a piece I wrote for a student from CIM (Cleveland Institute of Music)…
  • Thanks

    I think that in works that are musically testing, program notes are very helpful. Tonal music doesn't normally need "explaining" to the listener, but in "modern" music, without something to latch on to the listener can end up feeling lost, or at worst, alienated by the experience.

    I will have another listen with fresh ears.
  • Adrian, start with "Night Moods". This was the 1st offering by William. You probably missed it like I did.

    Adrian Allan said:
    Thanks

    I think that in works that are musically testing, program notes are very helpful. Tonal music doesn't normally need "explaining" to the listener, but in "modern" music, without something to latch on to the listener can end up feeling lost, or at worst, alienated by the experience.

    I will have another listen with fresh ears.
    The Rain Forest
    Well, my fierst offereing wasn't recieved well, so I thought I'd try again with a piece I wrote for a student from CIM (Cleveland Institute of Music)…
  • Too minimalistic for my taste.
  • Just one question: Have you ever written for an 11 year old?

    Maybe I should post the larger work for 2 pianos that was the basis for this 'little' work for an 11 year old.

    Thanks for the comment,
    Best,

    Bill

    Miguel Marquez said:
    Too minimalistic for my taste.
    The Rain Forest
    Well, my fierst offereing wasn't recieved well, so I thought I'd try again with a piece I wrote for a student from CIM (Cleveland Institute of Music)…
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