Symphony No 2

Hi All,

As promised, my next post to the board is to share Symphony No.2. In four movements, and playback is with the Sibelius Ultimate and NotePerformer softwares. Quite a landmark work for me; hope you'll find it interesting!

https://soundcloud.com/chris-finlayson-228497123/symphony-no-2-op10

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLH4aChgUu4tchNrm2w2BeklWJzUVguNd3


Chris

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  • this is a quite ambitious and obviously very serious work with a number of striking passages-- the climax and coda to the 3rd movement being one of the most memorable. The thing which I expect will most immediately strike people, however is the obvious quote from the scherzo of Beethoven's 4th with the "wrong" harmony and I'm not sure if this is supposed to be sardonic or not. The finale strikes me as overall being rather more commonplace in its invention though it develops into an impressive coda.

    I still get the feeling which I have from one or two other works that overall things are a bit too ponderous -- I'd perhaps prefer more dramatic variation in tempi or more wildness at times (perhaps more contrapuntal writing would help) though that could just be me. At any rate, I certainly admire your endeavour and plan to continue investigating your output.

    • Thanks for your viewpoint and for listening. A greater contrapuntal impetus is something I'm definitely hoping to develop in current and future works. I wanted to write a scherzo in the Beethoven spirit, and it did finish up close to the 4th symphony (one of my favourites) in outline and meter, although the intervals don't exactly match the original Beethoven theme. 

      • certainly the intervals don't exactly match the original -- indeed it took me a few minutes to work out which scherzo it was referencing, despte immediately recognizing the music. I think the scherzo is in fact an interesting piece in its own right, especially the rather mysterious central section. And I'm not immune from Beethoven's influence myself -- a Cavatina in one of my string quartets has a fairly obvious source of inspiration.

         

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