Some loud music I worked on...

https://soundcloud.com/jason-something/mad-max-short

Hey all, just wanted to post this short track I worked on for a Mad Max-inspired short done by my college friend. I think it's one of my higher-quality produced tracks thus far. It uses some loud horns, strings, bass drums, guitars, you know, regular "epic" sounding stuff. Haha. Tell me what you guys think!

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    I found it rather enjoyable, and thoroughly atavistic, in the sense which I suppose it was intended to be.  Very good beginning, which grabs one's attention.   Nice use of electronic effects.  Guitar usage, just prior to the end is a nice effect.

     

    Fredrick's comments about contrast, and volume are almost certainly apropos.

     

    It raises the question (as Bartok's Allegro Barbaro does), just how remote and barbaric a past can we evoke (and should we evoke) in our music?  What of Prokofiev's Scythian  Suite?  People feared that, so I don't think it was ever performed on stage dramatically, as he intended, or certainly not very often.  

     

    In a similar vein to Bartok's Allegro Barbaro, hear this surprisingly similar (and effective, I think) piece by Gorecki,

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlZYL8zjBb8

    Henryk GORECKI: Piano Sonata nr.1 op.6

    Do such evocations, esp. when tied to visions of an apocalypse, necessitate the pessimism that our future will be a "Mad Max" kind of world?  Or will the future be more like Zamyatin's "We?"  Huxley's Brave New World, or H.G. Well's Shape of Things to Come (or Men Like Gods)? 

     

    I prefer optimism, but I have no objections to atavism or primitivism in music at all, if the purpose is to allow one to enter (if only temporarily) a certain type of mindset, which this does.

     

    Nicely executed. 

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