Sigh no more, ladies

Sigh no more, ladies

Sigh no more, ladies, from Much Ado About Nothing, is one of Shakespeare's best known lyrics. I've adapted the music for this setting, with substantial revision, from a setting for soprano duet and piano by Charles Lincoln, 1850.

The sound file is computer generated as a demo using choral ah voices, though the vocal is supposed to be one mezzo-soprano.

Comments welcome on any aspect of the piece, even if a long time has passed since it was posted.

Score pdf and audio mp3 attached.

Also accessible for simultaneous score and sound file on MuseScore: Sigh no more, ladies.

The lyrics are in the score, but for convenience I also give them here:

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,

men were deceivers ever,

men were deceivers ever.

One foot in sea, and one on shore,

to one thing constant never,

to one thing constant never.

 

Then sigh not so,

but let them go,

and be you blithe and bonny,

converting all your sounds of woe

into hey nonny nonny.

 

Sing no more ditties, sing no more

of dumps so dull and heavy,

of dumps so dull and heavy.

The fraud of men was ever so

since summer first was leafy,

since summer first was leafy.

 

Then sigh not so,

but let them go,

and be you blithe and bonny,

converting all your sounds of woe

into hey nonny nonny.

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Please note that while this composition is based on words and music in the public domain, my setting of it is an original creative work under copyright.

For performance or recording permission, please see:

sites.google.com/site/jcorelis/music-permissions

Image: Henry Irving and Ellen Terry as Benedick and Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Terry_and_Irving_-_Much_Ado.jpg

Sigh no more, ladies.pdf

Sigh no more, ladies.mp3

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Replies

  • Hi Jon,

    fine art this. The atmosphere is like we imagine the old Shakespeare days. The words are singing too, well it is Shakespeare. I think you give the poem what it deserves with your nice music. I look forward to hear be singing.

    All the best,

    Kjell

  • Thanks for the comment, and for liking it.  I do hope to get a singer to perform or record it some day.  If any male vocalists reading this are interested, I could also create a version for tenor or baritone.

  • Hi Jon,

    A great idea, a fine niche to create works in.

    I have noticed a number of parallel 8ths in the score:

    second beat of bar 12 A first beat of bar 13 G is parallel btw Fl and Vcl.
    second beat of bar 17 F first beat of bar 18 A is parallel btw Fl and Vcl.

    to name a few.

    It seems it might be possible to change them for ex. using F in spite of A

    in the second beat of bar 12 at Vcl.

    Hmmm, Interesting work.  Let's see what comes next.

    Ali

  • Thanks for the comment.  I'll look at those measures.

    Ali Riza SARAL said:

    Hi Jon,

    A great idea, a fine niche to create works in.

    I have noticed a number of parallel 8ths in the score:

    second beat of bar 12 A first beat of bar 13 G is parallel btw Fl and Vcl.
    second beat of bar 17 F first beat of bar 18 A is parallel btw Fl and Vcl.

    to name a few.

    It seems it might be possible to change them for ex. using F in spite of A

    in the second beat of bar 12 at Vcl.

    Hmmm, Interesting work.  Let's see what comes next.

    Ali

    Sigh no more, ladies
    Sigh no more, ladies Sigh no more, ladies, from Much Ado About Nothing, is one of Shakespeare's best known lyrics. I've adapted the music for this…
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