Hi,

 

I would like to show you my piece for cello solo. It was performed in James MacMillan festival 2009. Performed by really great cellist Pei-Sian Ng.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hy52MjHxvRg

 

regards

Mantas Savickis

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Replies

  • Wow, my head exploded after finishing listening to it. Who knew you could have so many lines that weren't a part of the actual staff lines. :) 

     

    Allow me to rate it in the style I usually use for reviews of music (I'm assuming you'd like some feedback here, right?), but bear with me since my categories aren't usually for live/solo works.

     

    ~Production

    Usually this is where I criticize how the sound came out, but that's only for sampled instruments, so instead I shall ask: how did you make those really cool one to two to three etc. bar note things, like at 1:30 in the video? That's a really nifty bit of notating I've never seen before to be perfectly honest.

     

    ~Listenability 

    The overall piece is probably one of the most enjoyable solo string works I've listened to in quite a while. Usually, when one thinks of solo strings, one's mind inevitably comes back to Bach's solo cello suites and his violin solos (well, my mind does anyway), but in this case, I feel as if one could dispense of the norm completely in that regard, and enjoy the music, free of the constraints of past solo works. Also, the overall tone was extremely well captured. I can tell that those Seven Brothers certainly didn't take a walk in the park with their picnic baskets, that's for sure. However, the actual mood you were trying to capture has eluded me somewhat, which adds to the mystique of the piece. 

     

    ~Genius

    I feel as if some sort of boundary was completely transcended with this piece. Usually, I merely listen to ancient classical music, and as such, I am rather limited in my experiences with music that is so formless, and I say formless in a good way. The sheet lacks any bars, the one to two etc. bars I mentioned before give the soloist a tremendous degree of freedom, and the use of rests, long, droning tones, portamentos, gliss., all that jazz, gives it a sound I've never heard before. Indeed, I think you have reinvented the cello in some degree. But hey, that's just my limited listening experience coming through.

     

    ~Creativity

    Like I said, this is way out of my league in terms of anything I've seen or heard before, so you get top marks from me in this category. However, I do feel that during the long duration of the piece, some of the unique elements were overused a tad. The portamentos could be toned down just a bit - give the poor cellist the opportunity to use a bit of legato I'd say. 

     

    ~Tilt

    This is usually where I compare the piece of music in question to other things I've heard by the same person, but I don't have anything to really compare it to. However, after listening to the linked song at the end of the video, Spring Passion, I am tempted to say you have a very dark, very brooding, very saddening method of writing, and I enjoy it greatly. 

     

    I trust this has been insightful. Thank you for sharing this piece of music with the community here - we're all a little bit more sad because of it. :)

  • Thank you for your great review.

    "how did you make those really cool one to two to three etc. bar note things, like at 1:30 in the video"

    I composed "Seven Brothers" using Finale 2009 software. Finale has very unfriendly interface so to do that was not so easy :D But using sibelius 6 it's very easy to do :D

     

    "The sheet lacks any bars, the one to two etc. bars I mentioned before give the soloist a tremendous degree of freedom"

    Before I started to write this piece, I knew who will be the cellist. And he is really good. That's why I decided to give lots of freedom to performer. This is my first piece without bars and limited tempo.



    Benton Anderson said:

    Wow, my head exploded after finishing listening to it. Who knew you could have so many lines that weren't a part of the actual staff lines. :) 

     

    Allow me to rate it in the style I usually use for reviews of music (I'm assuming you'd like some feedback here, right?), but bear with me since my categories aren't usually for live/solo works.

     

    ~Production

    Usually this is where I criticize how the sound came out, but that's only for sampled instruments, so instead I shall ask: how did you make those really cool one to two to three etc. bar note things, like at 1:30 in the video? That's a really nifty bit of notating I've never seen before to be perfectly honest.

     

    ~Listenability 

    The overall piece is probably one of the most enjoyable solo string works I've listened to in quite a while. Usually, when one thinks of solo strings, one's mind inevitably comes back to Bach's solo cello suites and his violin solos (well, my mind does anyway), but in this case, I feel as if one could dispense of the norm completely in that regard, and enjoy the music, free of the constraints of past solo works. Also, the overall tone was extremely well captured. I can tell that those Seven Brothers certainly didn't take a walk in the park with their picnic baskets, that's for sure. However, the actual mood you were trying to capture has eluded me somewhat, which adds to the mystique of the piece. 

     

    ~Genius

    I feel as if some sort of boundary was completely transcended with this piece. Usually, I merely listen to ancient classical music, and as such, I am rather limited in my experiences with music that is so formless, and I say formless in a good way. The sheet lacks any bars, the one to two etc. bars I mentioned before give the soloist a tremendous degree of freedom, and the use of rests, long, droning tones, portamentos, gliss., all that jazz, gives it a sound I've never heard before. Indeed, I think you have reinvented the cello in some degree. But hey, that's just my limited listening experience coming through.

     

    ~Creativity

    Like I said, this is way out of my league in terms of anything I've seen or heard before, so you get top marks from me in this category. However, I do feel that during the long duration of the piece, some of the unique elements were overused a tad. The portamentos could be toned down just a bit - give the poor cellist the opportunity to use a bit of legato I'd say. 

     

    ~Tilt

    This is usually where I compare the piece of music in question to other things I've heard by the same person, but I don't have anything to really compare it to. However, after listening to the linked song at the end of the video, Spring Passion, I am tempted to say you have a very dark, very brooding, very saddening method of writing, and I enjoy it greatly. 

     

    I trust this has been insightful. Thank you for sharing this piece of music with the community here - we're all a little bit more sad because of it. :)

    "Seven Brothers" for cello solo (2009)
    Hi,   I would like to show you my piece for cello solo. It was performed in James MacMillan festival 2009. Performed by really great cellist Pei-Sian…
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