Romanticizing and deifying Music

If you are like me with a large number of musician and music educator friends (or even just friends with people who love music) you might see the occasional article being posted on places like Facebook, Twitter, etc. praising the powers of music in one way or another. You yourself might have posted one or several of these articles. When people of the music community try to advocate for music we often go for many of the following lines:

The list goes on and on. On top of the almost magical properties that many of these articles promise, it also doesn't take long to find people claiming music save their lives in one way or another. A common trope one might hear or read in a celebrity musician's bio is the transformative effect music (and/or other musicians and composers) had on them. 

NOW, I'm not one to discount to discredit any of these claims or research nor diminishing the effect music had/has on peoples lives. But I would like to discuss our relationship with the medium. Often, these articles and bios make music out to be an almost "cure-all" treatment to all of life's problems. And it is not just the way we talk about the miracle properties of music that seems almost romanticizing. 

In the way we speak of music, I find that many treat it almost like a divine presence. Music can do no wrong and must be treated with the upmost seriousness and respect. From musicians and composer outright saying things to the effect of "music is godly" or "music is a way to speak closer to the divine", or attributing god like characteristic to composers (which is something painters have been doing since the day of Beethoven if you examine the iconography of composers portraits compared to their actual death mask--there is a lot of god imagery in many of Beethoven's portraits).

There are also subtle ways we place music on a pedestal. From the act of dressing up to see a classical music concert, placing a much higher standard of quality to music than many other things like food or what clothes we wear. Even the way many of us look up reverently towards the composer we admire as if they themselves were divine beings that we could never measure up to. 

But is any of this really bad or good? Does deifying music harm our relationship with music or does it do music good to be treated this way? Do you find yourself looking at music through this romanticized lens? Discuss our relationship with music and if romanticizing and deifying music is inherently good or bad for us. 

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  •  

    Music, in my opinion, is far from "deified," at least in the United States.

     

    When a new director was appointed to head up the Paris Opera, it was headline news in France.   When Pierre Boulez died recently, the headlines were world wide, though in the US his death was hardly noted or discussed.   Compare that with the US media coverage of the death of Antonin Scalia.  It should be obvious that Boulez (and many other figures in the world of music) have done far more good for the world than Scalia, even if we only count Boulez's work as a conductor. The only mention of opera I heard in recent weeks in the mainstream news had to do with the fact that Scalia and Justice Ginzberg were friends, and that they listened to opera together.  What operas they heard together was not discussed, nor was there a move to play more opera in the mainstream or cable media, as any sort of tribute to that "friendship."

     

    The music that allegedly "improves memory," increases the ability to do math, and so on (usually Mozart) is not held in high regard or celebrated by the American Mainstream Culture.  Nor do Media Moghuls wish to promote it.  Everyone on Composers' Forum will note that, though the US has many more cable and satellite stations than ever before, there are LESS stations that broadcast symphony orchestras, chamber music concerts, piano recitals, music competitions, opera performances and ballet. 

     

    So is music "deified" in American culture?  No.  What IS "deified" by the gatekeepers of media culture?  Nothing having to do with the "arts."  It's the military, war and war making that are the objects of apotheosis in the United States.  Ares, the Greek god of war, is the deity most worshipped.

     

    See this map showing where the US has a military presence right now.  Consider the fact that each year the US Congress is spending more and more on arms, weapons, occupations, bombings, drone attacks, forward basing (witness the recent bombing last week of Libya, without any explicit legislative approval, or even a new UN resolution regarding Libya).  Even the most liberal candidates for the Presidency cannot openly call for a decrease in military expenditure.  Does it make sense to talk of a "deification" of music and musicians in this context?

    8608378266?profile=original

     

    We can compare the amount that the US spends on music (and the arts in general) with what is spent on the military. The US government spends some tens of millions on the arts, less that one fortieth (1/40) of what the German government spends. That amount is miniscule compared with what the Pentagon and Congress allocate for war, war preparations, and on going bombing operations (The projected federal budget for war spending amounts to a total of 583 BILLION, for the coming year).  And this doesn't even include "secret budgets" (estimated to be between 40-80 Billion, or more) for military operations performed by the CIA and other intelligence agencies that also involve the use of force and arms.  Republicans and Democrats alike complain about "sequestration," which (supposedly) puts a limit on the expansion of military expenses.  Yet these limits were avoided over the last several budget cycles simply by putting extra money in the "contingency" fund, amounting to many billions of dollars.   To top this off, there hasn't been a successful audit of the Pentagon for decades, so no one knows where all the money has gone over the years—well over a Trillion is unaccounted for.  If a Trillion dollars spent on music had gone unaccounted for in the federal budget for four decades, I might then concede that music and musicians had become "deified" in the US.

    US "musical presence" abroad:

    8608368086?profile=original

     

    We are all aware that many hundreds of Billions (let's emphasize this—between 500 and 600 billion) are spent each year to prepare for killing, to engage in war and destruction; and a tiny fraction of that is spent on music by the government. So how can we say that the gods of music, the Muses are revered in the US?  Isn't it rather the case that Mars {war}, Phobos {fear} and Deimos {terror} and all the gods of battle, are worshipped by the people and the state? 

     

    Some people may have read this article reporting how little the US spends on the arts, compared to other nations:

     

    Culturally Impoverished: US NEA Spends 1/40th of What Germany Doles Out for Arts Per Capita-- 10 countries that leave the US in the dust on funding the arts.

     

    http://www.alternet.org/culture/culturally-impoverished-us-nea-spen...

     

    Here we read,

     

    "In 2011, art funding in the United States reached a record low following the financial crisis. The 2013 National Arts Index revealed art spending made up just 0.28 percent of the government’s non-military budget in 2011, with local government spending also dropping by 21 percent over that time. The percentage of American households donating private funds to the arts also declined by almost 9 percent."

     

    If we examine just Germany alone, we find:

     

    "Germany’s cultural budget was approximately $1.63 billion USD in 2013. According to Ian Moss, research director of Fractured Atlas, Germany’s art funding in 2007 equated to roughly $20 per German citizen, which 'dwarfs the 41 cents per red-blooded American provided by the NEA. What artist wouldn't want to live there?'”

     

    You know, in part, what a country values by what its government decides to invest in.    So the US government spends roughly tens of millions on the arts total (and even less on music), while spending hundreds of billions [not on "defense"] but on actively going around the world—see map above—in search of areas to place forward bases so it can kill people.  Estimates of those killed by US military action, or as a result of wars of aggression caused by US military action range between 1 and 2 million during the last 15 years.  If we count back to the Korean War, the number rises to approximately eight million.  [No, the US military has not killed as many as Stalin's USSR, Hitler's Reich, or Mao's China, but the Pentagon appears, since the demise of those dictators, to rank a close fourth]. 

     

    Here is a partial list of US military interventions over the last century:

     

    {I would love to see a similar list of US "musical interventions" abroad, over the last century—where the US sent in emergency musical ensembles, into zones of possible conflict, to inspire positive feelings, and raise people up to a higher level of cultural consciousness}

     

    FROM WOUNDED KNEE TO SYRIA:

    A CENTURY OF U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

    http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/interventions.html

     

    Once again, I ask people to rethink this, and reverse the spending ratio.  Let's have a truly all-voluntary armed forces (where the government pays nothing to soldiers at all, but people simply volunteer to fight, when they really think and believe the US is under threat, and genuinely needs protecting, as in the case of an invasion of the country); and let's spend all those hundreds of billions on the arts, with a least 200 billion spent a year on promoting any and all kinds of music, for the good of the world, and the celebration of the unity of humankind, in the Spirit of Beethoven's and Schiller's Ode to Joy.

     

    Even if we did that we would not be guilty of the "apotheosis" of music (as if that's such a bad thing), or even the worship of the Muses, Orpheus, or Apollo and his lyre.   We would be striving to make the world more beautiful (as opposed to more conflicted, more bellicose, increasingly war maddened and torn to shreds by needless aggression).   Beauty is not identical with Deity, but the promotion of music and beauty may help people think in ways that are closer to the patterns of a Divine Mind, and we would be reacting less on the merely animal level.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

  • Probably should have been clear. I'm not talking about is music deified by society as a whole. It's obviously not for sure but the very lengthy way you pointed out. I'm talking about us, the music community. Are we, the music community, romanticizing and deifying music too much that we are possibly ignoring how others see music or ignoring the problems music has in the publics eyes? Are we right to lift music up or are we all just wearing rose colored glasses?
  • Im going to just address your answer to the questions in this topic. Don't think the military spending applies to how this topic is presented. Military spending seems like another topic. 

    I do feel that we, the music community, do romanticize music to much. We do it to the point were most of us do not see any inherit issues music is facing. We proselytize our music to those on the outside using the findings in these studies, but we grossly over exaggerate what they promise. What we end up being are snake oil salesmen which sets us up for failure and not success. 

    Take the math study, if you look at the actual research document and not the article you will find that the improvement is very small. Additionally, these studies were done in labs in controlled environments, not in classrooms with children with additional stresses such as their economic situations, peer pressure, and the quality of education they are receiving. No matter how great we think music can improve your test scores or relieve stress, it has no effect on the child who goes home to no food, who's parents work two or three jobs and will soon except them to work to support the family, or the child who is receiving subpar at best education. These are factors we tend to ignore when we push music as the miracle cure, and when music doesnt produce the results it promises, its easy for those in charge to cut music. 

    Deifying music is also harmful to us. Its only thing to raise music up in high regards and we should do that, but raising it to the level of a God sets us up for failure. On this forum particularly, I see composers speak about other composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, and others like they are Gods who's talent is unmatched and only wrote the best. But that way of thinking does two things: it sets the bar of success unreasonably high and it prevents us from standing next to these composers as our equals but instead places us at barely their feet. 

    Many of us see these composers as being world renown and recognized figures that are beloved by all and hated by none. Too many of us see that as the mark of success and anything less is failure. On the other side of this coin, another group of us look at these composer not as men but as deities that we can never hope to even match nor should we try. You can only have positive things to say about their music, anything less is blasphemy. Both situations are not true: the mark of success is not completely world adoration nor are we doom to live in the shadows of these composers. The truth of the matter is, we can reach success that our great composer achieved (all be it a much different kind of success) and that we can see ourselves someday standing next to them as equals because they are just people like us who wrote music like us. Its time and patients (as well as a little bit of study and encouragement) that we need, not mindless worship. 

    O. Olmnilnlolm said:

     

    Music, in my opinion, is far from "deified," at least in the United States.

     

    Even if we did that we would not be guilty of the "apotheosis" of music (as if that's such a bad thing), or even the worship of the Muses, Orpheus, or Apollo and his lyre.   We would be striving to make the world more beautiful (as opposed to more conflicted, more bellicose, increasingly war maddened and torn to shreds by needless aggression).   Beauty is not identical with Deity, but the promotion of music and beauty may help people think in ways that are closer to the patterns of a Divine Mind, and we would be reacting less on the merely animal level.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

    Romanticizing and deifying Music
    If you are like me with a large number of musician and music educator friends (or even just friends with people who love music) you might see the occ…
  •  

    Hello, Tyler.

     

    Thanks for your last post, which serves as a profound clarification of your point of view, and the issues you raise.  I agree with much of what you say, especially as you proceed.  So I will describe where I disagree with you, in the first instance; and where, as you go further into the argument, where our views coincide.

     

    You said,     

     

    "I'm going to just address your answer to the questions in this topic. Don't think the military spending applies to how this topic is presented. Military spending seems like another topic."

     

    With all due respect, I disagree, on that last point.

     

    1.  When we talk about what is worshipped, or what people revere, there has to be a comparison and contrast between various objects of worship and reverence. 

     

    8608366872?profile=original2.  Even on Composers Forum, I notice some people revere, worship and venerate the military and "the nation" more than they venerate music itself.  Evidence for this lies in the way in which people often defend the use of music to promote, commemorate and encourage the unthinking support for war that characterizes the thought of so many American citizens.  While the use of Music for Promoting War seems okay, I hear no one advocating any war for the sake of music.  That's very telling, in and of itself.

     

    3.  If we were talking about a different country, where "perpetual war" was not such a high priority (such as Switzerland, Finland or Costa Rica), then things might be different.  But when we are talking about the country which spends by far THE MOST of any country on Earth for war and war preparation, and THE LEAST of any economically developed country, on music and the arts, then the issue of the military, and worship of the God Mars (in virtually all his guises) becomes a paramount concern.

    8608367275?profile=original

     

    "I do feel that we, the music community, do romanticize music too much."

     

    Compared to what, I wonder.  Do Warriors worship killing and weapons too much?   Do professional criminals worship theft, coercion and murder too much?   I think we have to accept as a basic assumption, that people in their professions glorify and try to promote the benefits of their profession.   The question might be whether criminals, arms merchants, generals, and politicians (bought out by the military industrial complex) do more harm to society than "people in the music community?"  

     

    "We do it to the point were most of us do not see any inherit issues music is facing. We proselytize our music to those on the outside using the findings in these studies, but we grossly over exaggerate what they promise. What we end up being are snake oil salesmen which sets us up for failure and not success."

     

    Let's assume what you are saying is absolutely true (though I don't believe it is). If these huge sums of money (dedicated to war, war making, and killing) were instead dedicated to the promotion of art and music, the world would be better off.  The problems in the US and in Europe have nothing or very little to do with "musicians" selling their music as if it were snake oil.  The main problems have to do with the horrific waste of societies' resources, channeled into organized mass murder, in Asia, Africa and the Middle East.  As far as the Arts and Music go, I agree with Fyodor Dostoevsky and Gustav Mahler, who proclaimed, "Beauty will save the world."

     

    "Take the math study, if you look at the actual research document and not the article you will find that the improvement is very small."

     

    Again, with all due respect, that's of little consequence.  The truth is, music nourishes the soul, and yet you cannot measure the benefits to the soul, which is undoubtedly uplifted by the works of Bach, Beethoven, Debussy Stravinsky and countless others.   Once you try to quantify the benefits of a Bach concerto, you fall into the kind of logic which makes County supervisors say, "Let's slash the music budget for schools:  there is no demonstrable benefit."  I am surprised anyone who studies music would even try to make this argument.  I say this as a person who has never made a single cent from music, and who sees music as something subtle and with virtually imperceptible benefits, on the psychological, emotional and spiritual levels.

     

    One can agree with Beethoven, who said,

     

    "Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy."

     

    This is not to overestimate the value of music, but to underestimate it, as the repertoire becomes richer and richer as the decades go on, and as the appreciation of different kinds of music, from different epochs and different lands, expands and develops.  Now, of course, I agree with you when you say,

     

    "No matter how great we think music can improve your test scores or relieve stress, it has no effect on the child who goes home to no food, who's parents work two or three jobs and will soon except them to work to support the family, or the child who is receiving subpar at best education."

     

    That is absolutely true.  And it's all the more reason why we should denounce the extravagant expenditures on war and war making, on bailing out banks and banksters, and countless other expenditures on behalf of the richest 0.1 %, rather than on the majority of the people, the poor and the public good.

     

    "These are factors we tend to ignore when we push music as the miracle cure, and when music doesn't produce the results it promises, its easy for those in charge to cut music."

     

    Perhaps we agree on this point, at least to a certain extent.   Any attempt to quantify the "value" of music, in purely numerical and measurable terms is doomed to failure.     

     

    "Deifying music is also harmful to us. Its only thing to raise music up in high regards and we should do that, but raising it to the level of a God sets us up for failure."

     

    If the actual "Deification" of music itself were occurring, I would agree.  But to say that music allows one to have a window onto the divine, or to touch the super-material plane, is not entirely out of order.  To quote Beethoven again,

     

    Music is the mediator between the spiritual and the sensual life,"

     

    and

     

    "Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend."

     

    You said, Tyler,

     

    "On this forum particularly, I see composers speak about other composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, and others like they are Gods who's talent is unmatched and only wrote the best."

    8608367100?profile=original

     

    I see what you are saying, here.  I can only state my opinion, which is that no composers should be seen as "Gods."   I think Bach, Mozart and Beethoven are on one very high level.   (Yet still, everyone with a critical faculty knows they wrote some works that are less than "divine," and even sometimes "bad.")   You can burn every score of every piece by Chopin, and I wouldn't shed one tear.  We can have a debate about Robert Schumann.  If anyone here has insisted that Bach, Brahms, Mozart and Beethoven were purely divine beings, incapable of error, never making a mistake, I wonder who that was, and what they said exactly?  I have a vague sense that you are right, and it has happened, but I have trouble remembering any specific acts of "worship." 

     

    "But that way of thinking does two things: it sets the bar of success unreasonably high and it prevents us from standing next to these composers as our equals but instead places us at barely their feet."

     

    I think there is a great deal of truth in that statement.  We do well to think of even the greatest composers, with the best reputations, as our comrades in history and in the present, rather than as gods or even demigods. 

     

    "Many of us see these composers as being world renown and recognized figures that are beloved by all and hated by none. Too many of us see that as the mark of success and anything less is failure. On the other side of this coin, another group of us look at these composer not as men but as deities that we can never hope to even match nor should we try. You can only have positive things to say about their music, anything less is blasphemy."

     

    Yes, you are almost certainly right there, too.  I think some ruthless criticism of certain composers, in certain contexts, is not only beneficial, but salutary for the sake of creativity, improved inspiration, and the impetus to work harder.  So, I don't disagree, in principle, with that part of the argument.  On the other hand, the U.S. General who directs military activities in Afghanistan, or even the man who pilots the drone that kills the innocent child with a hellfire missile, designed by Lockheed, gets respect.  He gets more respect than musicians who play Haydn and Handel do in society today, in the US.  Even less respect goes to the "composer," today, in the culture at large.

     

    " ...  the mark of success is not completely world adoration nor are we doom to live in the shadows of these composers. The truth of the matter is, we can reach success that our great composer achieved (all be it a much different kind of success) and that we can see ourselves someday standing next to them as equals because they are just people like us who wrote music like us."

     

    I think that's a fair admonition, to the extent that our concern while composing should be the music itself, and the beauty, form, style and purpose of the music itself (without regard to such trivial matters as "reputation," "praise," "fame," or superficial "success.")

     

     

  • I appreciated what you both, Tyler and Ondib, have written, but I want to approach this from a different viewpoint:

    Do the test:   Go for a month without any music.  Go for 6 months.  Go for 1 year.

    Who can withstand that?  Who could actually do it?  Wouldn't it amount to a kind of torture?

    There can be no normal life without music here and there, in my opinion.  So all of the claims you list, Tyler, are true.  If we had no music we would be depressed and disfunctional.


    In other words, we can argue whether music relieves stress, but we know that to be forced to remove all music from our lives would lead us into a state of high stress levels.

    I disagree that children living in poverty do not benefit from music.  People under any type of stress will find it hardest to live without music.  Art in general is a basic need of humanity, not something that is sought after only after the stomach is full.

    Chris Carman shared this trailer with us some time ago. My son and his friends have watched the film together in the movie theatre:


    On the (much different, and separate) topic of deifying "the Beethovens" I do think it's too much and counter-productive. In fact, I was raised in an atmosphere of such solemn reverence of the great dead composers that it never occurred to me (until recently) that perhaps I would be capable of composing a piece myself. It is a veneration that makes classical music itself appear to be beyond our reach. Additionally, orchestras keep playing the greats so often that the living composers have trouble being heard. Right?
    YouTube
  • Ondib,

    Do you still have that box of color pencils?  You need to fill in that blank map of the world to show the influence of US music worldwide.  It's been discoloring, I think, over the last couple of decades, reflecting the apparent decision by the US that it would rather be feared than loved.  Before that, let's say in the 1980s and 1990s, US popular music was loved and revered worldwide, as an ambassador of US culture that was equally loved, envied, and emulated.

    I randomly remember this example, which is as good as any other: During the Hainan Island incident in 2001, the American prisoners in China "gradually developed good relations with their guards, with one guard inquiring of them the lyrics for the song "Hotel California" by the Eagles.[23]" (cited from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hainan_Island_incident)

    When members of the East Timorese resistance movement visited Seattle in the 1990s, they wanted to listen to American western country music on the radio.  That was the music of the resistance movement against the Indonesian occupation.  They knew the western singers and songs and associated them with freedom.  These had been starving men hiding in the mountains of the Timor island, trying to survive the F-16 (US made) airplanes sent by Indonesia, singing cowboy songs whose lyrics they couldn't understand.

    Rock bands the world over in the 1980s and 1990s emulated US Rock bands.  I grew up with these guys here in Portugal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usd45n7Mm98

    Pretty much the entire world loved Madonna, Freddie Mercury, Michael Jackson, and etc etc etc.

    I think US music played a huge role in everything that happened leading up to the fall of the Berlin wall.

    I'm not a great analyst of these things, but I am pretty sure you need to seriously color that map there.  I do feel that things have changed after so many bombs and pillage.  Perhaps you see the map's colors heading that way... towards a complete blank...  Maybe just put a little color dot over Japan, to indicate a few lingering fans?...

    O. Olmnilnlolm wrote:

    US "musical presence" abroad:

    8608368086?profile=original

    Hainan Island incident
    The Hainan Island incident occurred on April 1, 2001, when a United States Navy EP-3E ARIES II signals intelligence aircraft and a People's Liberatio…
  • Sorry, got Freddy Mercury's nationality wrong. I may have gotten the whole thing wrong, too, in case you all were speaking strictly about classical music...

  • I don't think music is being romanticized or deified enough. (Sorry for my english , I'm dutch speaking)

    On the one hand since WW2  music isn't misused as much as the oil of military propaganda machines anymore, which is of course great news. Marches & processions have waned and will never again (hopefully) rise to the grandeur they had under Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler, and the mustering effects of marching bands all over history. But still, even Isis/Daesh is misusing music for mustering.

    Romanticism and Deification of music have had terrible roles in history. I don't think the Wagner issue needs to be repeated on this forum. We may conclude over-romanticizing is nowadays not so much an issue anymore, and has found a descent and well appreciated place in fiction films. Music as deification/romanticing of a film scene is an art itself.

    On the other hand, I think since the rise of Internet music has become (in general) to younger generations as free and public as drinking water, and lost much of its value and taste (both in market and in general appreciation). They walk around with crappy in-ears listening to low resolution mp3 of the top hundred frequent downloads. They share music as we share water with dinosaurs, without much notice or care.

    It's a good thing music schools in my country (Belgium) are still subsidized. Music has a way of seeping in, even though no obvious talent or interest is shown. I am confident to say music education boosts creativity, memory, abstract thinking, emotional involvement and historical awareness. 

  • Keep in mind I'm not saying music doesnt do all the things it promises nor am I saying that we can or should live without music. What my concern is that we over simplify the positive effect of music. Yes music relieves stress, but it doesnt cure you of all your stresses completely. Yes music can relieve my own stress but it doesnt keep the stress of how to pay my bills or the stress of school completely go away. Unfortunately, we many advocate for music, they do simplify these articles as doing just this. "Listen to music and boom instant A's in math" that is not reality and it is setting an extremely high bar for music to do. Music can help you focus your mind and study better, calm your nerves to absorb information better, but its not going to make you suddenly know calculus or make geometry suddenly make sense. Music's affect on out brains is much more complicated and nuanced than we give it credit. Thats where I feel romanticism of music becomes a problem, it essentially overly simplifies things to the point of almost being false. 

    Mariza Costa-Cabral said:

    I appreciated what you both, Tyler and Ondib, have written, but I want to approach this from a different viewpoint:

    Do the test:   Go for a month without any music.  Go for 6 months.  Go for 1 year.

    Who can withstand that?  Who could actually do it?  Wouldn't it amount to a kind of torture?

    There can be no normal life without music here and there, in my opinion.  So all of the claims you list, Tyler, are true.  If we had no music we would be depressed and disfunctional.


    In other words, we can argue whether music relieves stress, but we know that to be forced to remove all music from our lives would lead us into a state of high stress levels.

    I disagree that children living in poverty do not benefit from music.  People under any type of stress will find it hardest to live without music.  Art in general is a basic need of humanity, not something that is sought after only after the stomach is full.

    Romanticizing and deifying Music
    If you are like me with a large number of musician and music educator friends (or even just friends with people who love music) you might see the occ…
  • Mm. You can't measure the benefits of music on the mind using a scientific method.

    Though it may occur in repeated results that people overly exposed to music (or poetry) have a knack of being first in line to notice that such a scientific experiment as checking the influence  of music on the brain on a large group of people is a mad case of wild goose chase.


    Tyler Hughes said:

     Music's affect on out brains is much more complicated and nuanced than we give it credit. Thats where I feel romanticism of music becomes a problem, it essentially overly simplifies things to the point of almost being false. 

    Romanticizing and deifying Music
    If you are like me with a large number of musician and music educator friends (or even just friends with people who love music) you might see the occ…
This reply was deleted.