A couple of weeks ago I posted the "Emotional dialog among loved ones."

In the full version here (over 5 minutes), the dialog is interrupted by 2 different reminiscences.

I would be interested in getting your input on whether the piece gained or lost with the addition of the reminiscences.  In this case, is it that "less is more" or that "more is more"?

Thank you sincerely for taking the time to listen.

(the short version, without the reminiscences, was just the first part followed by the last part, each played just once)

By the way, the lovely written score was produced by Joshua Warren of "Warren Music Copying" (http://www.warrenmusiccopying.com).  He is very knowledgeable, does a great job, and doesn't charge much at all.

Mariza

EmotionalDialogReminisc_MarizaCabral.mp3

EmotionalDialogReminisce_MarizaCabral.pdf

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Replies

  • Please ignore the speed marking at the start of the score.  I put that in so I could hear it played fast by the program (to check for any typos) and then forgot to remove it.  Geesh.  If you do decide to play it at that speed, though, please send me a recording :-)

    Mariza

  • Hi Mariza,

    This is quite lovely and well performed. It reminds me of Glenn Gould playing the Goldberg Variations, so much so that I have to wonder if you are influenced by that performance. Thanks for posting!

    Gav

  • Thank you, Gav.

    Glenn Gould is my favorite performer of all time, and Bach my favorite composer of all time.

    Have they influenced me?  Of course.  But I don't dream of being measured on the same scale! 

    I'm a better composer than performer.  My ability to play is really very limited, but this piece is easy to play and the "rubato" makes it easier still.  My practice time amounts to less than 5 minutes per day and I have very limited dexterity.  Any competent piano student will play this better than I do, I think. 

    But I'm glad you enjoyed it.  You had written somewhere that you generally don't appreciate neo-classical pieces much, so I feel good that this one interested you.

    Best,

    Mariza

  • Good influences! You underestimate yourself as a pianist, I think. You've interpreted your own piece with feeling and emotion in a way that really brings out the tenderness of it, which I think is its essential quality. I do rarely comment on pieces that are strictly in a past style, but there is a difference between writing in a past style and writing something new based on one's influences, which is what I think you did. You have some quirky harmonies and melodies which sound fresh to me, and that is what drew my attention - best to you -

  • Thank you, Gav.  How very kind of you.  I appreciate your comments.

    Mariza

  • Lovely piece! I think the reminiscences help make the piece more well-rounded, elaborated. I heard it as a rondo form, with the reminiscences as episodes. I love rondo forms; they let you drill the main theme into the listener without making them feel it's repetitive. ;-)  I like this version a lot better than the previous, short version. This version feels more satisfying, like a full meal, whereas the short version felt like just an appetizer.

    And while the outward trappings of the piece may be baroque-like, it's definitely more than just a baroque imitation; You definitely have your own voice here; the harmony is definitely not the "typical" baroque harmony, it has your own special flavor to it while still paying lip service to the baroque idiom.

    The overall imagery I got from listening to this piece was that of an old black-and-white silent movie, of a young couple in a mostly-empty room, having an animated but intimate conversation. Another imagery I got was also a pair of birds fluttering around each other in an isolated, quiet place. Your playing style is quite enjoyable to listen to, and definitely different from my own!

  • Thank you so much, Michael and Teoh, for your comments and opinions.  The associations we make between different pieces of music can be interesting and unique, and I have to say, Michael, I would never have associated this piece with any of those Liszt pieces.  I am glad, I guess, though also somewhat surprised, that you both felt that the 'emotional dialog' gained from the added 'reminiscences'.  I will keep them, then.  I had assumed they made the piece less cohesive, and was getting prepared to slash them out, and maybe use them to "seed" two separate new pieces.  But if in fact it works for the listener this way, then all the better -- at least now I can claim to have a piece which is longer than 5 minutes! :-)

    Teoh - Thank you for the idea that it's a "rondo" form.  I think you are right, and I hadn't thought of that.  I also appreciate that you felt I have my own voice in this style.  This gives me a lot of confidence, actually.  Also Gav said something to that effect.  This is very reassuring to me, since these melodies appear in my mind spontaneously "out of nowhere" and I much prefer to think they are coming from my subconscious, as opposed to being a rehash of something I might have heard some decades ago and is resurfacing now.  It seems to be the case that these are voices from my own subconscious, like it's writing me a letter "Dear self: here is what it's like here in your subconscious right now. Yours, Signed: You." :-)

    I also feel encouraged to hear you and Gav state that you like my playing.  That was really a surprise.  I come out of this exchange with a whole lot more confidence that I'm doing something worthwhile.

    Thank you sincerely, and enjoy your weekend.

    Mariza

  • BEAUTIFUL piece. Extremely lovely/elegant. I'm looking forward to hearing more from you.



  • Bob Porter said:

    You claim to have not studied music theory, and that that frees you from various constraints.

    I was looking for the "silver lining" of not having studied theory.  I studied the basics, like most piano students do.  And I am taking Tyler's online music theory class now.  That should demonstrate that I do NOT consider ignorance to be an asset...

    I might be more inclined to like this piece if you were to pick a key and not have so many accidentals. Why? Well, of course it would change the melodic and harmonic structure a lot. So much so that you probably wouldn't like it. It wouldn't be you. I get it. But, as it is, this very melancholy piece lacks focus.

    If you take the 1st and last part, which is the original version of the piece (posted here: https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/a-piece-in-emotional-ba...), I think it's perfectly focused and logical.  The comment you left at that time was very positive - you liked it.  The addition of the reminiscences does, in my opinion, make it less focused.  In fact, that was the question I asked when I posted it to the Forum.  I was reassured by a few that the reminiscences were a positive addition.  So if your opinion is that the reminiscences made the piece less focused, you could just write: "In answer to your question, Mariza, I do think they don't benefit the piece."  Wouldn't that have done it?

    To be honest, I think if you heard the piece played faster (a la Baroque style) it would make reasonably good sense (have focus) for you.  The melancholy style of playing does make the logic hard to follow.

    I'm not talking about staying within the rules. But I am talking about knowing what the rules are and when and how to break them for maximum effect. We all want our music to be effective. We all get there by different routes. It's part of what makes composing so dang much fun.

    Er... not sure what to say to this.  Rules, maximum effect, effective, etc, is not what is fun for me.

    Maybe music making is like Budhism, once you develop a really deep understanding of it, you realize that all you learned was superficial.  Could it be, Bob, that you haven't yet reached the state of a musical Budha?

    I think it would be well worth your while to learn a little notation. There is free software out there that is easy to learn and prints great scores.

    Is there a major problem with the score I posted?  Of course I learned notation when I took piano lessons, and I think I do an okay job writing down my pieces.  Be honest, Bob, you ate something sour at lunch time today...  I hope you'll recover soon and have a nice light dinner with a good glass of wine.

    Take care.

    Mariza

    Mariza,

    I don't listen to much piano music on the forum. It is not a very compelling instrument, to me. I wanted to listen to this because you have some interesting ideas. You claim to have not studied music theory, and that that frees you from various constraints. That's fine. We all write for different reasons. I might be more inclined to like this piece if you were to pick a key and not have so many accidentals. Why? Well, of course it would change the melodic and harmonic structure a lot. So much so that you probably wouldn't like it. It wouldn't be you. I get it. But, as it is, this very melancholy piece lacks focus. It wanders from place to place. There are just enough notes out of mode that the piece never quite lands in a satisfactory, warm and fuzzy place in my mind. I know I sound like an old fuddy duddy. I'm not talking about staying within the rules. But I am talking about knowing what the rules are and when and how to break them for maximum effect. We all want our music to be effective. We all get there by different routes. It's part of what makes composing so dang much fun.

    I think it would be well worth your while to learn a little notation. There is free software out there that is easy to learn and prints great scores.

    A piece in "Emotional Baroque" style
    Here is a piece in a style that I started calling emotional baroque . I know these two words are not traditionally supposed to go together, but... l…
  • Just to clarify, Bob, I wrote the piece by hand.  I sent the handwritten score to Josh Warren, to save me the time to enter the notes in the software.  But yes, I know how to do it.

    Mariza

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