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  • If there was a way of a conductor interacting with the samples (ie tempo, dynamics) to create a spontaneous performance each time, I think that the future of put orchestras would really be in doubt.

    I did actually think this technology existed in some form already. No doubt it will be developed in the near future.
  • There are experiments. I know of radio baton, which is quite an old thing (and not very flexible) but I'm pretty sure other madmen have already figured something better and continue to develop similar ideas.

    Adrian Allan said:

    If there was a way of a conductor interacting with the samples (ie tempo, dynamics) to create a spontaneous performance each time, I think that the future of put orchestras would really be in doubt.
    Rage Against the Machine: Apparently, Orchestras Hate You
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/12/arts/music/a-digital-orchestra-for-opera-purists-take-and-play-offense.html?_r=1
  • Michael, 

    It's been happening for a long time.  Circa 1980 I played with a 9 piece horn band (pop/rock funk, etc.).  We weren't getting rich, but we were definitely making more than just beer money.  By 1985ish we started losing jobs to small 4 piece groups who had an entire "orchestra" with them thanks to the DX-7 and other synths.  Didn't even remotely sound "real", but nobody cared.  It was close, and cost less than 9.

    The first time I saw Neil Diamond, he used a thirty piece orchestra for the concert.  The next time, they packed the orchestra into two big road cases, and the two keyboard/orchestra players climbed on the bus for the next town.  Nobody in the arena cared, and it was cheaper to produce the concert.

    Many smaller venue dinner/music theatres are using "canned" music to be able to afford the productions.  Even traveling broadway shows are using combinations of live and "canned" music.  Most people don't know the difference or care.

    As Ray said, it's all about economics.  Add to that, the newer audiences may never have heard "Phantom" or "Music Man" with a full pit orchestra.  Will they pay more for a ticket to see a full production in Peoria?

    Many current movie soundtracks are using combinations of live and sampled sounds, and the audiences don't mind a bit.

    Through many of these uses, they have a player performing the VSTs, so there is the ability to be spontaneous, but look at what some are capable of doing with a DAW where the performance breathes once programmed well.  Tomorrows audience isn't going to know that it's identical to today's performance.

    IMHO, technology is bringing "the Ring" to what could possibly be a whole new audience of people that will at least get to hear it done with live singers.

    The time's they are a changing!

  • Michael, that is a different situation. Nobody is talking about replacing soloists, or the centre of attention ( in this case the opera singers). We are discussing replacing the accompaniment.
  • I'm guessin' then that the English interpretation of another popular

    Beethoven piece would be 'Furry Lice' (probably couldn't afford the heating bill huh)

  • You mean Andy Williams?  Or was that moo-in River?

  • You mean Andy William?  Oh wait, that was Moo-in River.
     
    Kristofer P.D.Q. Emerig said:

    ..and the same author as the Moo-in' Light Sonata, I believe.
     
    Fredrick zinos said:

    Ah yes, The Beethoven goat concerto in D

    Rage Against the Machine: Apparently, Orchestras Hate You
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/12/arts/music/a-digital-orchestra-for-opera-purists-take-and-play-offense.html?_r=1
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