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Hello fellow composers!! 

Hope you are all well! :)

I wanted to discuss the idea of demos and promotion and what you guys have done so far in your careers in order to promote yourselves and using what methods and which did you find were best for your style of music?

I myself have recently finished a design for a mail shot and my blog post at my website can explain it better.

Please take a look and tell me if you think this kind of thing will work or has worked for you?

Thank you guys! Discuss away!

Anthony x 

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Link to the demo idea :)
http://anthonyj.co.uk/?p=376 

Well, Networking is probably the best way to get business. Undoubtedly the most difficult, finding the right people, and working for the right projects is all you need, promoting becomes obsolete because your work will speak for you.

However, if you are like me, unconventional, and willing to break standards, I suggest doing the "YouTube" route, in which you promote your music online for the entire world to see.

It's not as difficult as it seems. There are some composers who make it big once "discovered" on YouTube, and all it takes is consistency, and being smart about the execution of your promotion.

Some folks tend to think that the little details don't matter when uploading things to YouTube, and 2 years later, wonder why their channel hasn't grown. When in fact it's those very small details that count. Details like catchy thumbnails, interesting titles for your videos, how accessible your music is, and are the right systems in place to create attention.

For me personally, I started off doing mainstream music. Hip-hop, Pop, and R&B. When i got started, it was during the "golden age" of YouTube music, in which people were getting discovered left and right, due to the layout of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and sound-cloud, all of which had setups that worked in favor of discovering independent artists, like myself. I had garnered hundreds of thousands of hits, but i was not prepared, and slacked off when i really needed to make it count.

Now however, everything has changed, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are drastically different. In-turn, things are now more difficult to promote, essentially the market is over saturated with information, and the attention spans of many have gone to almost 0. Today it's now harder then ever to get noticed. But with change comes innovation. I decided to create a marketing strategy that would take advantage of "free downloads," in which one must share the particular page in order to download free music. It's not an entirely new concept, but extremely underused, because nobody knows the implications. So far it's done very well for me, for what it's worth, and in about 2 months, I've garnered a small but respectable viewership (7000 hits) and 48 subscribers, and increasing linearly everyday.

Of course, the real fun starts when your views increase exponentially, and this is when luck has to kick in. When your video becomes a suggested video under somebody else's popular video, all of a sudden your getting crazy traffic. With the "Share for track" system, the people begin to download your music, and the shares begin to roll in. All of a sudden you are the talk of Twitter and Facebook. Now, it's only a matter of time before the right people take notice, and you get work from all sorts of folks. Taking this route, the only thing you face is the issue of time. Like all things in life, this process will take time, and of course hard work. But the key is when your hard work, works for itself.

Let's step back a little and i'll explain a concept that really helped me focus on internet marketing.

Feedback... no, not the feedback someone gives to somebody else, but literal feedback, the sonic annoyance that occurs when a microphone comes too close to a speaker. All of a sudden you hear a loud noise and your speakers explode. Besides ruining a concert, feedback is actually a very interesting phenomenon that occurs when microscopic sonic occurrences become amplified by an unending cyclic system.

Imagine for a moment, you have the tweet for a track setup going on. Joe Shmoe visits your download page, and decides to download your track. He is then prompted to share his discovery to his desired social network. He shares to Facebook, receives his free music and goes on with his happy life. but something occurs behind the scenes. Joe's friends Alice and Bob view their Facebook timelines, scrolling down, they see Joe's post, and click to check out what you've shared. They listen to the music and decide they like it too, and begin to download your free music. They share, and continue with their lives. Two of alice's friends and one of Bob's friends see their posts, and so on and so forth. The process continues, and amplifies as more and more people see the page, and post the music. Like Feedback, the shares increase, and the noise gets louder and louder, in an unending, social cycle.

But now take into consideration, what really happens during sonic feedback. If the initial noise going into the microphone is loud, but the speakers aren't louder then the initial noise, then there is no feedback. or rather, noise goes in, nothing comes out. That means your speakers need to be louder. To apply the analogy, if the Facebook shares aren't drawing attention, then you need to mold those shares, and make them "louder," more pleasant to look at, easily catch people's attention. You need to customize it with video, images, catch phrases, Hash Tags, etc.

Now consider the opposite. The speakers are on max volume, but you don't have an instrument that can make a loud enough noise to enter the microphone...thus no feedback. you need some noise to get you started, and this is where the analogy shifts too hardcore work and networking. You need friends to listen in on your stuff and download, you need an initial body of folks who will download the music and get the ball rolling.

Lastly, consider this final situation, You've got a instrument to make the noise, your speakers are on max volume...but your microphone just doesn't work...either the diaphragm is broken, or has a bad jack...And thus you get no feedback. In this analogy, your microphone is literally your download page...your website, wherever your music is, it needs to be simple, effective, and coherent. If i click on your download page, and the download button is broken...then you just lost me. If i go to your page, and i can't listen to the music...You've lost me. If i go to your page and the page looks like absolute shit, or adds all over the place...you've lost me.

So, to sum up everything, this has been the strategic thinking I've adopted and applied to my marketing strategies, is the concept of creating feedback like systems. To explain every detail is difficult, but like i said earlier what really counts are the small things we don't often see at the surface, "it's the midget behind the machine" that does all the work. and of course this is just internet marketing. Industry Networking is an entirely different monster. Anyway i hope I've contributed to this thread one way or another ^.^

Justice,

There is justice in the world after all. Thank you for this erudite post which has helped enormously to crystalize my own thinking on where to go next with my music output

Being a classicist I think I probably have a considerably smaller market than the one you're alluding to...and getting people off their backsides just to make the odd comment (let alone passing them along on their chosen social medium) is hard work. But there is plenty of food for thought here and I thank you for putting it across so eloquently.

I will look at industry networking also...despite it being a different monster, because I think that's where I need to go with my style of music. I'm thinking of film and advertising tracks as well as live public performance so need to delve more deeply into these arcane and mysterious conduits.

Thanks again.

Stephen
 
Justice Hunter said:

Well, Networking is probably the best way to get business. Undoubtedly the most difficult, finding the right people, and working for the right projects is all you need, promoting becomes obsolete because your work will speak for you.

However, if you are like me, unconventional, and willing to break standards, I suggest doing the "YouTube" route, in which you promote your music online for the entire world to see.

It's not as difficult as it seems. There are some composers who make it big once "discovered" on YouTube, and all it takes is consistency, and being smart about the execution of your promotion.

Some folks tend to think that the little details don't matter when uploading things to YouTube, and 2 years later, wonder why their channel hasn't grown. When in fact it's those very small details that count. Details like catchy thumbnails, interesting titles for your videos, how accessible your music is, and are the right systems in place to create attention.

For me personally, I started off doing mainstream music. Hip-hop, Pop, and R&B. When i got started, it was during the "golden age" of YouTube music, in which people were getting discovered left and right, due to the layout of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and sound-cloud, all of which had setups that worked in favor of discovering independent artists, like myself. I had garnered hundreds of thousands of hits, but i was not prepared, and slacked off when i really needed to make it count.

Now however, everything has changed, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are drastically different. In-turn, things are now more difficult to promote, essentially the market is over saturated with information, and the attention spans of many have gone to almost 0. Today it's now harder then ever to get noticed. But with change comes innovation. I decided to create a marketing strategy that would take advantage of "free downloads," in which one must share the particular page in order to download free music. It's not an entirely new concept, but extremely underused, because nobody knows the implications. So far it's done very well for me, for what it's worth, and in about 2 months, I've garnered a small but respectable viewership (7000 hits) and 48 subscribers, and increasing linearly everyday.

Of course, the real fun starts when your views increase exponentially, and this is when luck has to kick in. When your video becomes a suggested video under somebody else's popular video, all of a sudden your getting crazy traffic. With the "Share for track" system, the people begin to download your music, and the shares begin to roll in. All of a sudden you are the talk of Twitter and Facebook. Now, it's only a matter of time before the right people take notice, and you get work from all sorts of folks. Taking this route, the only thing you face is the issue of time. Like all things in life, this process will take time, and of course hard work. But the key is when your hard work, works for itself.

Let's step back a little and i'll explain a concept that really helped me focus on internet marketing.

Feedback... no, not the feedback someone gives to somebody else, but literal feedback, the sonic annoyance that occurs when a microphone comes too close to a speaker. All of a sudden you hear a loud noise and your speakers explode. Besides ruining a concert, feedback is actually a very interesting phenomenon that occurs when microscopic sonic occurrences become amplified by an unending cyclic system.

Imagine for a moment, you have the tweet for a track setup going on. Joe Shmoe visits your download page, and decides to download your track. He is then prompted to share his discovery to his desired social network. He shares to Facebook, receives his free music and goes on with his happy life. but something occurs behind the scenes. Joe's friends Alice and Bob view their Facebook timelines, scrolling down, they see Joe's post, and click to check out what you've shared. They listen to the music and decide they like it too, and begin to download your free music. They share, and continue with their lives. Two of alice's friends and one of Bob's friends see their posts, and so on and so forth. The process continues, and amplifies as more and more people see the page, and post the music. Like Feedback, the shares increase, and the noise gets louder and louder, in an unending, social cycle.

But now take into consideration, what really happens during sonic feedback. If the initial noise going into the microphone is loud, but the speakers aren't louder then the initial noise, then there is no feedback. or rather, noise goes in, nothing comes out. That means your speakers need to be louder. To apply the analogy, if the Facebook shares aren't drawing attention, then you need to mold those shares, and make them "louder," more pleasant to look at, easily catch people's attention. You need to customize it with video, images, catch phrases, Hash Tags, etc.

Now consider the opposite. The speakers are on max volume, but you don't have an instrument that can make a loud enough noise to enter the microphone...thus no feedback. you need some noise to get you started, and this is where the analogy shifts too hardcore work and networking. You need friends to listen in on your stuff and download, you need an initial body of folks who will download the music and get the ball rolling.

Lastly, consider this final situation, You've got a instrument to make the noise, your speakers are on max volume...but your microphone just doesn't work...either the diaphragm is broken, or has a bad jack...And thus you get no feedback. In this analogy, your microphone is literally your download page...your website, wherever your music is, it needs to be simple, effective, and coherent. If i click on your download page, and the download button is broken...then you just lost me. If i go to your page, and i can't listen to the music...You've lost me. If i go to your page and the page looks like absolute shit, or adds all over the place...you've lost me.

So, to sum up everything, this has been the strategic thinking I've adopted and applied to my marketing strategies, is the concept of creating feedback like systems. To explain every detail is difficult, but like i said earlier what really counts are the small things we don't often see at the surface, "it's the midget behind the machine" that does all the work. and of course this is just internet marketing. Industry Networking is an entirely different monster. Anyway i hope I've contributed to this thread one way or another ^.^

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