I originally wrote the theme -- the first stanza, actually -- while in high school. I tinkered with it, made a brass piece out of it in college, and more recently, decided to make a more polished work out of it. I am more at home with the choir, as that is the instrument I'm most familiar with, so I wrote this for piano to broaden my grasp of pianistic technique.

Melody and Variations.mp3

a melody with variations.pdf

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  • I thought that this was one of the most professional and detailed scores we've seen on here.

    I also admire your compositional ability and understanding of the piano. I can only make a few comments as I'm sure that this is better in many ways than what I could do.

    Firstly, am I right in saying that the theme is all the way up to the briskly flowing section ? I only ask this because it's not always obvious to me how the variations are related to the theme. Do they follow the same harmonic pattern or the same melodic pattern ? For example the 3/4 variation on page 5 sounded completely different,

    If the aim is not to follow the harmonic pattern, then by my ears after about page 6 I may have wanted some more exciting harmonic excursions. By this stage my ear was telling me that it wanted a bit more variety - secondary dominants etc. The mood of quiet repose just didn't hold my attention for so long.

    Certain parts I liked - like the Russian section on page 4 and the bold ending in D major.

    So in summary, beautiful score, great pianistic writing and counterpoint, but for me maybe a bit more excitement and variety about 3/4 of the way through would make it an even better work.
  • Thanks very much for taking a look at my piece, and thank you for your kind words.

    At the 3/4 (measure 181), a new variation begins with a small introductory section. The actual theme begins at measure 185 (where the big arpeggio happens). The main beginning of the theme is there, although it's quite transformed.

    I am looking at ways to move the harmonic structure a bit. I think your observation is very apt, and very helpful. I don't always see how a piece comes across; I've invested so much in it that I lose sight of the need for various things to keep it interesting.

    Adrian Allan said:
    I thought that this was one of the most professional and detailed scores we've seen on here.

    I also admire your compositional ability and understanding of the piano. I can only make a few comments as I'm sure that this is better in many ways than what I could do.

    Firstly, am I right in saying that the theme is all the way up to the briskly flowing section ? I only ask this because it's not always obvious to me how the variations are related to the theme. Do they follow the same harmonic pattern or the same melodic pattern ? For example the 3/4 variation on page 5 sounded completely different,

    If the aim is not to follow the harmonic pattern, then by my ears after about page 6 I may have wanted some more exciting harmonic excursions. By this stage my ear was telling me that it wanted a bit more variety - secondary dominants etc. The mood of quiet repose just didn't hold my attention for so long.

    Certain parts I liked - like the Russian section on page 4 and the bold ending in D major.

    So in summary, beautiful score, great pianistic writing and counterpoint, but for me maybe a bit more excitement and variety about 3/4 of the way through would make it an even better work.
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  • I would have liked a bit better a piano too. Maybe when I get my new PC the sounds will be better...

    Per-Erik Rosqvist said:
    Thanks for sharing this. I like the piece a lot.

    I am not a pianist either, but looking for info on playing techniques for that instrument. Anyway, this was really wonderful to listen to. I would have used another piano, and more reverb, but that's me :)
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