Mechanical as they were, the wind up music box and the metronome, had souls emerge in them from the flow of music. Gotten a little offbeat, particularly during their elopement away from the Music Shop were they had stood for sale, they sought happiness ever after in each-other's company.

Their happiness spread throughout the ether and I caught a whiff of it as I commuted to work in my car. I wrote it down at home and realized for the first time that I was able to "capture: music, a term I prefer as opposed to "compose". I hope you enjoy what I've captured. I'll post the score on my page.

The 3 parts should be played one right after the other.

Part I: Acquaintance and Romance

Part II: Elopement (with Romantic Distractions)

Part III: Happiness Ever After

Offbeat_Romance_Part_1_MarizaCabral.mp3

Offbeat_Romance_Part_2_MarizaCabral.mp3

Offbeat_Romance_Part_3_MarizaCabral.mp3

You need to be a member of Composers' Forum to add comments!

Join Composers' Forum

Email me when people reply –

Replies

  • OK, here's the score.

    Offbeat Romance.pdf

    https://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/8608234277?profile=original
  • This was my first composition ever (October 2013).  I have others now from the past year and a half, but this is the one that told me I was able to compose music.  I'm not saying it's great, but it gives me joy to have acquired even a modest ability in my middle-age years. My last encounter with music was the piano lessons I took before entering college and I had barely touched a piano in the interim 3 decades...

  • I’m really enjoying this, Mariza.  You do have a gift, and I share your sentiment about capturing. I suppose the composing part is in understanding the distinctions as to how and what to do with it next, or when to just throw it out ;)

    To my ears you really captured a sense of those 3 phases of a relationship. The first gives me the impression of being cautious, reserved, hesitent and not too confident, but poised for something more and going through the motions.  It’s undeveloped.  The second is very comfortable in its skin, playful, and still very new, superficial and even silly.  Your use of molto rubato is very nice, especially as they’re supposed to be keepers of the time.  The third is just wonderful.  It seems years have gone by.  There’s a warmth, depth and maturity – beyond any development.  They already did that. Now, there’s lots of memories - some sad one’s, a deep fondness and playfulness.

    You've said so much, so simply and elegantly.  Very nice piece, Mariza.

    ~D

  • Thank you, Alex, for listening and for the encouragement.  I do love counterpoint indeed.

    Warm regards,

    Mariza

    Alex Dunn said:

    Hi, Mariza,

    Was a pleasure to listen to this suite. It reminded me of Gabriel Yared's score to 'The English Patient' - a kind of blend between Bach and Mediterranean romance. 

    I think you have a gift for classical counterpoint - a rare thing these days! 

    All the best,

    Alex :)

    Offbeat romance between the little music box and the metronome
    Mechanical as they were, the wind up music box and the metronome, had souls emerge in them from the flow of music. Gotten a little offbeat, particula…
  • Dave,

    I really thank you for your comments. They make a big difference to me. I don't need to feed my ego (my ego is well established now that I'm 51). What I do need and appreciate is the sense of shared experience. I have a need to share with others the music I capture, and the fact that your experience of this piece was so similar to my own means there was a shared experience. That's very satisfying to me. 

    Yes, I agree with you when you write that "I suppose the composing part is in understanding the distinctions as to how and what to do with it next, or when to just throw it out ;)".  Yes indeed, sometimes there's that type of judgement to be made.

    However, with this particular piece, it really emerged in my mind out of nowhere with little involvement of judgement, deliberation, or much else from my conscious mind.  These three little tunes were playing in my mind all of a sudden, and I thought for a while they were 3 separate pieces!  It was only when my mind reached the end of the 3rd part that I "heard" the 1st part again and therefore concluded that they were part of one same piece.  Then I considered the possibility of the 2nd part also being part of that same piece, and decided it was.  I put the 3 together and thought to myself "my gosh, so mechanical sounding! It's like a music box fell in love with a metronome."  Then I interpreted the 2nd part as their elopment and the 3rd as their happiness together.  And voila, I had a piece.  Hard to use the term "compose" after this experience, isn't it?  It was more like a radio capturing radio waves. 

    I remember as a kid hearing one of the brothers Gibb (of the "Bee Gees") describe how they composed their songs.  He said the brothers would get together and start playing, and they would all tune into the same "radio channel" and would all hear the same (brand new) tune at the same time.  That's even more mysterious, I suppose, since it involves more than one person.  I guess there is really a lot we don't know about who we are as humans.  Mystery is everywhere because we know so little.

    Mariza

    Dave Ostrowski said:

    I’m really enjoying this, Mariza.  You do have a gift, and I share your sentiment about capturing. I suppose the composing part is in understanding the distinctions as to how and what to do with it next, or when to just throw it out ;)

    To my ears you really captured a sense of those 3 phases of a relationship. The first gives me the impression of being cautious, reserved, hesitent and not too confident, but poised for something more and going through the motions.  It’s undeveloped.  The second is very comfortable in its skin, playful, and still very new, superficial and even silly.  Your use of molto rubato is very nice, especially as they’re supposed to be keepers of the time.  The third is just wonderful.  It seems years have gone by.  There’s a warmth, depth and maturity – beyond any development.  They already did that. Now, there’s lots of memories - some sad one’s, a deep fondness and playfulness.

    You've said so much, so simply and elegantly.  Very nice piece, Mariza.

    ~D

    Offbeat romance between the little music box and the metronome
    Mechanical as they were, the wind up music box and the metronome, had souls emerge in them from the flow of music. Gotten a little offbeat, particula…
  • You’re very welcome, Mariza,

     

    Well then, yes, I do see what you mean about how the piece was captured fully formed.  That’s so very cool.  The repeated ¼ note figure certainly ties it all together on a rudimentary level, but to have the whole ball of wax happening is really exciting, impressive, and one heck of a gift.

     

    Often times up here, I wished I hadn’t seen a title or descriptor prior to listening to someone’s piece.  I would have liked to approach yours without seeing how you presented it in words, and seen how I perceived it.  It seemed so obvious and clear what it was when I was listening, and suggestibility is always a thing, so all I can do is wonder, enjoy it, and share the experience.

     

    I’ve never experienced what you do in a macro sense like that, but it seems most if not all my best ideas arrive without any thought or effort, away from my desk, while I’m not actively “composing,” working, or even thinking about it.  Trying to solve a problem is usually a ridiculous waste of time, and if I’d just learn to get up and do something else, it will tend to come to me then.  I also love counterpoint – working on a traditional fugue as we speak – and I’m not what one would ever think of as left brained (at all – ever!).  Counterpoint always seemed so primarily left brained, to me.  I’m surprised I enjoy it so much.  What’s interesting is that contrapuntal issues and problems seem to get addressed in a similar manner – still requiring some work on the other end, but it’s as if I’m being handed the map, at least.

     

    I’m very much looking forward to what you capture next.  Have a great weekend Mariza,

    D

  • Susan,
    Thank you very much indeed, for listening, and for adding your comment about the "romantic distractions" (it should be in the plural - the singular is a typo). That 2nd movement should be played faster, to convey the sense of running away (elopement) - but I don't have the dexterity since I don't have time to practice playing, so I played it slower that I'd like. It's supposed to go really fast, but occasionally get distracted and "lost in time" (the romantic distractions).
    Best!
    Mariza

  • Hi, Dave.

    Responding to your message, whatever gift I have came late in life. I didn't have it in my youth, I can tell you that. It was a surprise to me when the "gift" appeared 2 years ago. Something for Oliver Sachs...

    I can say that there was something new and different that I did which started this. I had gotten a new job that involved a car commute. In the car, I forced myself to not play in my head any songs that I had heard before. This was difficult at first, since I seem to constantly be playing something in the back of my mind. I forced myself to stop that. The only way I'd allow me to play music in my head was if it was my own tune. The reason for this "mental exercise" was that I was tired of playing the same old same old pieces and wanted to get them out.

    That mental exercise had the unexpected consequence of in fact producing new tunes in my head. I quickly got used to it and started writing them down, with the help of my son's keyboard at home. So that's my story.

    I'm not at all surprised that your best pieces or themes arise when you're not deliberately composing.

    You wrote that you find that composing in contrapuntal style doesn't violate that rule, even though you had always thought of counterpoint as primarily left brained. That is a very interesting point to me, because I compose largely in counterpoint style (though not always) and it's a right brain thing to me. If music required my left brain, I wouldn't do it. My day time job exhausts my left brain and the reason I love to compose is that it uses my right brain almost exclusively.

    I believe it's a misconception that counterpoint is an exercise of applying rules to sounds. The "rules" may be found in counterpoint pieces, and we can even feel their "orderliness", but these rules are descriptive, not prescriptive. A law by which everyone must wear a helmet before riding a motorcycle is of the "prescriptive" kind. The ideal gas law, which says that air pressure depends varies inversely with volume for a fixed temperature and number of molecules - that's a law of the "descriptive" kind. We observe that gases behave that way, but they are not following rules. On the contrary, the orderliness of the ideal gas law is the result of the random movements of all the molecules in a constrained space.

    The orderliness of counterpuntal pieces is, in my opinion, more like the ideal gas law. There is a lot happening in a musically constrained space, and the result is the emergence of regular patterns.

    I suspect that JS Bach being German, and the stereotype of German culture being order-loving, also contributes to the misconception that counterpoint is the result of following a large amount of rules which somehow Bach learned back in his time. I think that's all B.S. He certainly followed some basic rules, but his music is not the product of rules and formulas, nor could it ever be. His music was highly inspired music because he had a hugely profound soul and gigantic talent.

    We live in reductionist times, of course, and I heard a Bach scholar pose the question "what makes Bach's music sound so profound?" as if this question can be answered with some music-making formulas. The real answer is that his music sounds profound because it is profound. This cannot be reduced to anything simpler, and "profound" cannot be faked.

    I really wish you the best experience in writing your fugue.

    Mariza

    P.S. I will keep in mind what you wrote and next time I won't post commentary when I present a piece - I'll let the listener experience without preconceived ideas.





    Dave Ostrowski said:

    You’re very welcome, Mariza,

     

    Well then, yes, I do see what you mean about how the piece was captured fully formed.  That’s so very cool.  The repeated ¼ note figure certainly ties it all together on a rudimentary level, but to have the whole ball of wax happening is really exciting, impressive, and one heck of a gift.

     

    Often times up here, I wished I hadn’t seen a title or descriptor prior to listening to someone’s piece.  I would have liked to approach yours without seeing how you presented it in words, and seen how I perceived it.  It seemed so obvious and clear what it was when I was listening, and suggestibility is always a thing, so all I can do is wonder, enjoy it, and share the experience.

     

    I’ve never experienced what you do in a macro sense like that, but it seems most if not all my best ideas arrive without any thought or effort, away from my desk, while I’m not actively “composing,” working, or even thinking about it.  Trying to solve a problem is usually a ridiculous waste of time, and if I’d just learn to get up and do something else, it will tend to come to me then.  I also love counterpoint – working on a traditional fugue as we speak – and I’m not what one would ever think of as left brained (at all – ever!).  Counterpoint always seemed so primarily left brained, to me.  I’m surprised I enjoy it so much.  What’s interesting is that contrapuntal issues and problems seem to get addressed in a similar manner – still requiring some work on the other end, but it’s as if I’m being handed the map, at least.

     

    I’m very much looking forward to what you capture next.  Have a great weekend Mariza,

    D

  • That’s an interesting exercise to force out anything familiar to make way for something new.  I’m sure I’m not disciplined enough for something like that ;) However, I tend to not listen to much music, for similar reasons, or just because I’m not interested.  If I get a hankering for something specific, I’ll go for it.  When I’m commuting I usually listen to the latest mix of whatever I’m working on.  It’s a good time to review, and it’s cool to see what comes up while focusing on something else more important.  I carry a tune like a champ, but can erase Beyonce and plug in something I’m working on pretty easily.  I guess the trick is to keep our own music in our heads.

     

    This forum has been great for me, though.  I’ve heard things I never would have, and that’s been inspiring – in the sense of “Wow, look what other folks are doing.  This is exciting.”  So, it’s been motivating me along of my path.

     

    In terms of counterpoint and “rules,” I’ll assume we’re referring to traditional counterpoint.  When I was at Berklee, the rules were driven in, and every note and interval became something to compartmentalize as being either “right,” “wrong,” or “could be better”- this before even considering if it sounded half decent.  My true love of counterpoint comes from hearing so much Handel, Bach, Buxtehude, and the like, pretty much since in-utero.  I’m sure that influence provided my understanding of it from an aesthetic standpoint. But, in an academic setting where a fugue instructor states, “it will never sound like Bach, so forget about that and just obey the rules…” apparently has had a grip on me, and is something I’m still working through – partly, maybe out of defiance; mostly ‘cause I love the way “properly” done, traditional counterpoint washes through me.  There’s a perfection to it, and for me it absolutely requires an awareness of the (left brained) distinctions that make it so. I approach pretty much everything from very right brained stance, so any set of distinctions, I see as more comparatively left brained than most folks. I suppose “comparatively” is an important distinction in the left/right conversation, and I can see how you’re left brained work week could make something with such creative possibilities seem very right brained.

     

    I’m a classical acupuncturist, and everything I do in the treatment room is anything but left brained.  Every assessment relates to how particular aspects of functioning, function within the whole, as a quality, and the only way I can do that is to shut off my brain, and ignore the potential compartments and labels.  If I was in a job that required left brained thinking all day, every day, I’d probably quit or get fired, and no, I wouldn’t want to come home and do more of that, so I acknowledge where you’re coming from there.  I don’t even bother trying to balance my checkbook, but see counterpoint as a nice way to keep my mind sharp – ‘cause sometimes I need it, and because it’s much more fun than Sudoku.  Plus, it (hopefully) sounds nice, too, which is the biggest thing. But yes, I very much need to work for it.  It’s like building and solving a puzzle at the same time.  And you should see/hear the mess I’m in as we speak ;)  Most of the rest of the time, writing is a very intuitive process – like a radio antenna, as you said. 

     

    I think part of Bach’s genius was that the distinctions became utterly embodied and inherent, rather than a conscious effort.  And yeah, a couple centuries of contrapuntal music, and what we now refer to as traditional harmony, which he’d studied, surely influenced him.  Even beyond the studies, the fact that “traditional” music was pervasive would suggest that, that’s just how folks there, heard music then, as opposed to here, now, where we’re inundated with everything including the kitchen sink. So, I can understand why you’d want to shut it all out. 

     

    Have a great night, Mariza,

    D

  • Finally got around to listening to this. Wow! I really enjoyed it, especially the first two parts. The last part was pretty good too, though there were some parts I thought sounded a bit more discordant than I would've expected given the overall style of the suite. I thought the ending sounded a little too open because of the dominant note on the bass. But that could just be my classically-biased ears distorting my perception. *shrug*

    Anyway, I liked how you reused certain motifs throughout the piece, presumably to refer to the two characters, and thereby give it an overall coherence. Overall, the suite is light, pleasant to listen to, and quite cute. Thumbs up!

This reply was deleted.