Newtonal Fugue: Thomic

NEWTONAL FUGUE: THOMIC

  

The thomic is, in some ways, the most rewarding of the Thomes & Phases techniques. In the same way that tonal music (the interplay and flux between consonance and dissonance) fulfils its profoundest potential using contrapuntal textures, so Newtonal music finds its greatest potential for expression in the application of the phase principle to the purely melodic treatment of the thome material. In fact, in this type of composition, the phase structure virtually disappears as the various combinations of the thomes are examined and explored.

 

Most interesting is the continuity between tonal fugue and Newtonal thomic. This continuity is, of course, not unique to Newtonal thinking. However, in addition to (for example, and most obviously) Schoenberg’s use of diminution, augmentation, inversion and retrogression when applied to the atonal tone-row, one may add, in the specific context of the thomic; stretto, false entry and other devices associated with tonal fugue.

 

When experimenting with the combinations of thomes, the degree to which such combinations reflect either a predominantly tonal or an atonal bias is entirely a matter of choice and musical preference.

 

I offer this piece as proof positive that the theory of Newtonality and the techniques of Thomes & Phases can be considered as a continuous development of and from the techniques of the tonal era. If free counterpoint, the most demanding of all tonal textures, can be rendered in Newtonal terms, then anything else is child’s play. Indeed, I have proved this to be true many times in both large and small scale compositions.

 

(I will be engraving the ms score with Sibelius, so it will be viewable/downloadable shortly)

Thomic_from_Prelude_and_ThomicAVI.mp3

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Replies

  • I'm intrigued to know more about the workings of Newtonal Thomic. Do you have a link where I could learn more about it, perhaps.

    After listening to it, it sounds like an overlapping of different keys, not unlike the music of Shostakovich.
  • I really will make an effort! Sounds like fun... I'm all for THAT!

    Thanks again, Cheers nick

    James Semple said:
    Hi Nick, it would really be great if you could come along on the 16th. We bring together a lot of composers from quite different backgrounds but the conversations are entirely ego-free. It's simply a lot of fun. I genuinely think you'd have an interested group of people with which to discuss your Newtonality. I'm a big theory guy myself so I'd love to chat about it.

    cheers

    James



    Nick Capocci said:
    Hi James

    I don't composes for money. I'm just a hack pianist/teacher.

    Thank you for taking the trouble to reply inteligently. If I can get to the next composium I will, though work comes first.

    James Semple said:
    Hey Nick, thanks for your comments. I'm assuming from your reply that you're a concert composer rather than a film composer (I read your profile and although it says you make your living from music it doesn't say what you actually do).

    Personally I see classical music has swung massively back towards tonality with atonality being a self-conscious aspect of the 20th Century style. This has probably been down to the enormous influence of film music in the orchestral world for a variety of reasons such as: -

    - Money: recording films is one of the last areas where orchestras can still get paid regularly
    - Audience: film (and videogame) music concerts regularly pack massive concert halls that are normally half-empty

    Having said that, atonality is present in film music (just not the big themes that most of the audience remembers) and the devices are useful.

    The next Composium is being held in London on Saturday, October 16th. You'd certainly have a lot of composers around to discuss your Newtonality ideas with.
    Newtonal Fugue: Thomic
    NEWTONAL FUGUE: THOMIC    The thomic is, in some ways, the most rewarding of the Thomes & Phases techniques. In the same way that tonal music (the in…
  • Interesting Simon. Thanks for listening.

    Quite a few people have expressed an interest in this, so I will shortly be uploading the score - with explanatory notes - to Sibelius. Will definitely be posting the lnk - probably under a new discussion title. (Watch this space... or one nearby!)

    Simon Godden said:
    I'm intrigued to know more about the workings of Newtonal Thomic. Do you have a link where I could learn more about it, perhaps.

    After listening to it, it sounds like an overlapping of different keys, not unlike the music of Shostakovich.
    Newtonal Fugue: Thomic
    NEWTONAL FUGUE: THOMIC    The thomic is, in some ways, the most rewarding of the Thomes & Phases techniques. In the same way that tonal music (the in…
  • The shifting harmonies are intriguing but I feel the ending on an A major triad a little disappointing. Also I don't feel the 'neo-classical' textures and phrasing make for any more interesting music than, for example Stravinsky in the slow movement of Symphony of Psalms or passages from Orpheus.
    That said, any tool that facilitates the composing process in this era of having to invent a sound world for every new piece, is a worth looking at.
  • Very enjoyable piece! I liked the mellow character very much... since I've tried to listen to modern music day and night (the past year), and never could I enjoy it endlessly... But this music could follow me everywhere, without annoying at all!
    What gives it a nice nuance is also, that your personal style (which I don't know, but is probably in there), does not overwhelm the listener. Most modernists force upon their audience, a work that is mostly a pain in the butt, to listen to!

    And to calm you a litte bit - I do hear a new style in this work... It is pretty much as you define it a nice mixture of tonality and atonality. I believe to be schooled enough to notice that. The baroque end, though must have been a joke, or? Maybe a tribute to Bach...

    Greets again and good luck. I'll get back to this, when my studies continue and my head gets more music-y

    Ario
  • Highly intelligent observations – many thanks. Yes, I can see why you think the ending is a bit of a crowd pleaser… nothing could have been further from my mind, however.

    I do hope you will look out for the follow-up discussion which will include link to the sib. score and explanatory notes. I can assure you, newtonality is a totally fascinating subject!


    Michael Tauben said:
    The shifting harmonies are intriguing but I feel the ending on an A major triad a little disappointing. Also I don't feel the 'neo-classical' textures and phrasing make for any more interesting music than, for example Stravinsky in the slow movement of Symphony of Psalms or passages from Orpheus.
    That said, any tool that facilitates the composing process in this era of having to invent a sound world for every new piece, is a worth looking at.
    Newtonal Fugue: Thomic
    NEWTONAL FUGUE: THOMIC    The thomic is, in some ways, the most rewarding of the Thomes & Phases techniques. In the same way that tonal music (the in…
  • Hello Ario

    Thank you once again for your observations; intelligent and thoughtful, as always.

    If you learn nothing else from newtonal thinking, remember it is no crime to consciously pay homage to your spiritual and technical inspiration. (Until I discovered LVB, I considered the high Baroque as the pinnacle of musical achievement. And… do not whole passages of the ninth sound exactly as if they had been written by Handel?)

    Do look out for my next discussion. This will contain the link to the Thomic score and detailed explanatory notes.

    I’ll be back teaching shortly, so I may be a little slow replying to comments etc…!


    Ario said:
    Very enjoyable piece! I liked the mellow character very much... since I've tried to listen to modern music day and night (the past year), and never could I enjoy it endlessly... But this music could follow me everywhere, without annoying at all!
    What gives it a nice nuance is also, that your personal style (which I don't know, but is probably in there), does not overwhelm the listener. Most modernists force upon their audience, a work that is mostly a pain in the butt, to listen to!

    And to calm you a litte bit - I do hear a new style in this work... It is pretty much as you define it a nice mixture of tonality and atonality. I believe to be schooled enough to notice that. The baroque end, though must have been a joke, or? Maybe a tribute to Bach...

    Greets again and good luck. I'll get back to this, when my studies continue and my head gets more music-y

    Ario
    Newtonal Fugue: Thomic
    NEWTONAL FUGUE: THOMIC    The thomic is, in some ways, the most rewarding of the Thomes & Phases techniques. In the same way that tonal music (the in…
  • Thank you for your comments. As you expressed an interest, here’s the score version with explanatory notes.

    https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/newtonal-fugue-thomic-s...



    Simon Godden said:
    I'm intrigued to know more about the workings of Newtonal Thomic. Do you have a link where I could learn more about it, perhaps.

    After listening to it, it sounds like an overlapping of different keys, not unlike the music of Shostakovich.
    Newtonal fugue (thomic) score with explanatory notes
    Contemporary counterpoint - a rich subject. here is the link to the score of the thomic - the Newtonal version of fugue.   For those unable to access…
  • Thank you for your comments. As you expressed an interest, here’s the score version with explanatory notes.

    https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/newtonal-fugue-thomic-s...




    Ario said:
    Very enjoyable piece! I liked the mellow character very much... since I've tried to listen to modern music day and night (the past year), and never could I enjoy it endlessly... But this music could follow me everywhere, without annoying at all!
    What gives it a nice nuance is also, that your personal style (which I don't know, but is probably in there), does not overwhelm the listener. Most modernists force upon their audience, a work that is mostly a pain in the butt, to listen to!

    And to calm you a litte bit - I do hear a new style in this work... It is pretty much as you define it a nice mixture of tonality and atonality. I believe to be schooled enough to notice that. The baroque end, though must have been a joke, or? Maybe a tribute to Bach...

    Greets again and good luck. I'll get back to this, when my studies continue and my head gets more music-y

    Ario
    Newtonal fugue (thomic) score with explanatory notes
    Contemporary counterpoint - a rich subject. here is the link to the score of the thomic - the Newtonal version of fugue.   For those unable to access…
  • Thank you for your comments. As you expressed an interest, here’s the score version with explanatory notes.

    https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/newtonal-fugue-thomic-s...




    Michael Tauben said:
    The shifting harmonies are intriguing but I feel the ending on an A major triad a little disappointing. Also I don't feel the 'neo-classical' textures and phrasing make for any more interesting music than, for example Stravinsky in the slow movement of Symphony of Psalms or passages from Orpheus.
    That said, any tool that facilitates the composing process in this era of having to invent a sound world for every new piece, is a worth looking at.
    Newtonal fugue (thomic) score with explanatory notes
    Contemporary counterpoint - a rich subject. here is the link to the score of the thomic - the Newtonal version of fugue.   For those unable to access…
This reply was deleted.