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The second piece for this combination. The coloratura should be accepted as another ensemble instrument. Written about 8 months ago and touched up a couple of weeks back.

It's through composed, relies on motifs, modern, borders on the atonal but is closer to chromaticism.

Any comment would be gratefully received. And many thanks if you can give it a listen.

Cheers.

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Hi, I can't see a link to your content. Not sure if it's a browser issue on my end, or if you missed it out in your post (easily done). Thought I'd point it out in case it helps. Looking forward to hearing it anyway!

Oh dear. It's there an mp3 file embedded in the site. 

I'll upload it again.... Thank you for your interest.

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 Hi Dane,

 This was a most interesting and scary musical journey. Coming from a person who is probably atonally challenged ( me), when it comes to complex structures that go beyond the apparent tonal variety. I always find these journeys interesting listening. You display a keen talent for this sort of thing which begs mystery and suspense at every corner. I imagined myself in the jungle at night in a forest full of over sized ass biting spiders. Due to my total lack of grasp on this sort of thing this is where my mind tends to go with it. I mean no disrespect. I actually hold you in highest regard when it comes to these complex structures. You are a master of it. I think Alfred Hitchcock types everywhere who make movies should have your phone number on hand. Seriously.

The mix is perfect. I love the vocal additions which only served to heighten the effects. Thanks for sharing. Always a pleasure in every respect.

Hi Dane,

Once again, you've written a very colorful work with expressive writing for all of the instruments - including, perhaps especially, the vocalist. I loved the contrast between the tender, lyrical passages and the dramatic outbursts from the brass and percussion that threatened to send the whole thing into chaos. The composer that kept coming to mind was Berg (of Wozzeck perhaps). Obviously a great deal of work went into both the composition and the mixing. Very good work once again.

After reading Timothy's reaction, I have to say that I could easily see it as the soundtrack for an old Twilight Zone episode! Have to get that idea out of my mind, since the music by itself would NOT have reminded me of it if someone hadn't pointed it out! (gulp!)

Got it, thanks! I think the problem must've been on my end. Using a different browser I can see the links fine. 

Thanks for sharing this. I was fascinated throughout, it certainly is a musical journey. Some of the sounds were really nice (I particularly enjoyed the way the vocal passages blended in with other instruments). 


Dane Aubrun said:

Oh dear. It's there an mp3 file embedded in the site. 

I'll upload it again.... Thank you for your interest.


Hi, Timothy.

Many thanks for listening and commenting. Your perceptions aren't so far out. This was #2 of two pieces that I originally titled "Crisis in the City" but it could just as well be a jungle. I had night in mind when working on it.

It's a problem with 'impressionist-styled' music, through-composed rather than reliant on a formal structure. It'll only appeal to some - not many, I fear. Although it seems atonal it passes through tonal centres often, hopefully enough along with motifs that it makes some sort of sense.

That's why I particularly value you comment - it seems to have invoked a mood even if not a nice one in this case. (I do write tonally occasionally - am just working on concerto-ette for trumpet in E flat (some of the time anyway). It means much to me when listeners unaccustomed to the genre give their reactions. Most encouraging. Also flattered by your reference to the rendering, knowing that you spend a lot of time on the detail of mixing, yourself.

Again, many thanks.

Dane


Timothy Smith said:

 Hi Dane,

 This was a most interesting and scary musical journey. Coming from a person who is probably atonally challenged ( me), when it comes to complex structures that go beyond the apparent tonal variety. I always find these journeys interesting listening. You display a keen talent for this sort of thing which begs mystery and suspense at every corner. I imagined myself in the jungle at night in a forest full of over sized ass biting spiders. Due to my total lack of grasp on this sort of thing this is where my mind tends to go with it. I mean no disrespect. I actually hold you in highest regard when it comes to these complex structures. You are a master of it. I think Alfred Hitchcock types everywhere who make movies should have your phone number on hand. Seriously.

The mix is perfect. I love the vocal additions which only served to heighten the effects. Thanks for sharing. Always a pleasure in every respect.

Hello Liz,

Thank you for your generous remarks and listening. I'm flattered indeed that you felt something of Berg in the work though I'd never rank myself against such a composer. Lulu was one of the first 'atonal'/serial composers who made sense to me, seeming to evolve serial formalities with listenable, lyrical phrasing - almost surreal. The beauty of Lulu's hymn (sung by Geschwitz) at the close of Act 3 still hangs there in my mind. I loved the opera but thankfully Berg was never a big influence. I can see what you mean here though.

Like you, I try to imagine what I'd expect the orchestra/ensemble to actually do - not just playing notes but how they're played; how I'd explain to musicians the balance I was after. With work like this it can get delicate. It's encouraging indeed that you noticed these things. Apropos your closing remark, yes, it was that sort of mood that I was trying to capture: an unease, tension perhaps, as a deeper undertow to something superficially tranquil. 

So, thanks again, Liz.

à bientôt,

Dane 

Liz Atems said:

Hi Dane,

Once again, you've written a very colorful work with expressive writing for all of the instruments - including, perhaps especially, the vocalist. I loved the contrast between the tender, lyrical passages and the dramatic outbursts from the brass and percussion that threatened to send the whole thing into chaos. The composer that kept coming to mind was Berg (of Wozzeck perhaps). Obviously a great deal of work went into both the composition and the mixing. Very good work once again.

After reading Timothy's reaction, I have to say that I could easily see it as the soundtrack for an old Twilight Zone episode! Have to get that idea out of my mind, since the music by itself would NOT have reminded me of it if someone hadn't pointed it out! (gulp!)

Hi James,

Thank you for your comment and listening; and I'm pleased that it made some sort of sense. Pieces like this take a fair amount of work and your comment is most appreciated. Balance is always a problem because I never cheat with the fader knobs - like turning up the volume of a flute in its lowest register so it can be heard over multiple other instruments which would never happen in an orchestra. I usually set the faders to 0db then do all the volume stuff via velocity control as that also controls the timbre. 

It's also encouraging that the lone vocal line seemed to blend. Thank you for mentioning that.

Good that you were able to get to the mp3 player here in the end.

Cheers,

Dane

James Richardson said:

Got it, thanks! I think the problem must've been on my end. Using a different browser I can see the links fine. 

Thanks for sharing this. I was fascinated throughout, it certainly is a musical journey. Some of the sounds were really nice (I particularly enjoyed the way the vocal passages blended in with other instruments). 


Dane Aubrun said:

Oh dear. It's there an mp3 file embedded in the site. 

I'll upload it again.... Thank you for your interest.

It's always a pleasure to hear the beautiful sounds and inventive textures that you lay out for us Dane. In my case educational as well since I can somewhat grasp the technical issues you wrangle so adroitly.  But as others have noted there is a fine line of perhaps melancholy or even danger lurking under a relaxed mood here.  Fortunately no ass biting spiders, (I'll probably have nightmares now, thanks Tim!) but I could see the twilite zone reference as Liz has pointed out. There was an angst to those times that translated into some interesting music as well, but nothing so sophisticated as you have given us here. I'll have to review Berg as long as there are no spiders involved! :)  Thanks for posting and all the rest that you do here.

Don't know what to say! Ingo.

Well, sincere thanks for listening and your most generous comment....

No, no ass-biting spiders. There could be with my latest submission since I had to sweep the cobwebs off my 'theory'!

I'll always do what I can to help here but alas it's too often the blind (me) leading better sighted people. I have too much to learn.

About the "Trumpet Concerto" I tried out the intonation side of the humanise on it - nothing exaggerated, just slid it up to about 60% but the range of error is well within the default setting of 50 cents. It does seem to add something, especially to a precarious part like the trumpet.

We get bolder as we go along.

But it's gratifying to know that the Music for Orchestra made sense to you.

Again, thank you for listening.

All the best,

Dane.

Ingo Lee said:

It's always a pleasure to hear the beautiful sounds and inventive textures that you lay out for us Dane. In my case educational as well since I can somewhat grasp the technical issues you wrangle so adroitly.  But as others have noted there is a fine line of perhaps melancholy or even danger lurking under a relaxed mood here.  Fortunately no ass biting spiders, (I'll probably have nightmares now, thanks Tim!) but I could see the twilite zone reference as Liz has pointed out. There was an angst to those times that translated into some interesting music as well, but nothing so sophisticated as you have given us here. I'll have to review Berg as long as there are no spiders involved! :)  Thanks for posting and all the rest that you do here.

Another fine and Lyrical piece, Dane.

You really have a talent in getting the orchestration work perfectly with the vocalist. That percussion at the very beginning second 12 was surprising and refreshing, didn't expect that one. It adds to the mystery of the piece.

Beautiful work, Congratulations.

Saul, many thanks for your generous comment and listening through.

Orchestrating these pieces is quite difficult to get right - for me anyway because I do care. It's dead easy to make noises ad lib but transferring what's in my mind to an audio result takes much work and trial and error sometimes. I probably scrap more than I keep. 

So....glad it made sense to you

and thanks again,

Dane

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