https://vimeo.com/724039704

A friend asked me to write a recorder/flute duet, so I contemplated the differences between the two. A flute, thanks to the superior key system is a little more agile, so it would be obvious to give it the more challenging part. So I started out writing a slow melody for the flute and tricky rhythmic stuff for the recorder. And then I decided to flip the script.

Let me know what you think of the result.

 

Victor.

 

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Replies

  • fascinating -- the sound combination is pretty weird and the breathiness of the recorder can get in the way of clear articulation but I like it that way. A curious combination of tonalities from the fairly straightforward to bitonality when the lines seem to go in different directions, only to later come together. I don't like every harmonic choice but taken as a whole, a very worthwhile endeavour.

  • I second David Owen's comments.  A really interesting piece.  I think I could listen to this over and over again and not tire of it.  It has a modern yet strikingly "medieval" feel to it.  I enjoyed it!  

  • I agree with the previous comments, a really good piece.  It felt wild and unpredictable, as though both instruments were playing at the same time but not necessarily together.

    • Fair assessment. It was indeed born of an attempt to create pretty independent voices that somehow work together.

       

  • Maybe you'll be interested in a word about my compositional process. I overwhelmingly write for instruments that I can actually play, and quite often I "compose" by improvising the parts. I usually start with some idea about structure, but to kick it off I record a couple of measures or a phrase on one instrument into a DAW, and then improvise another part against that, going more or less by my memory of what I did. (In cases where the structure is regular enough, such as ground bass-like, I can "improvise" up to 12 parts or so.) If it doesn't sound good I make another pass. And then when the composition is wholly or largely finished, I write it out, take a look at the notes to make some corrections, tweak the structure etc. But basically, many of my compositions are written out improvisations.

    Thanks for listening and commenting.

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