Cubase 6

Because I don't have enough RAM capacity on my computer to load up as many instruments/articulations as I wish to without bits of the music stuttering,  I have to work on a main template, and then for audio mixdown, I have to turn 3 or 4 sections into audio tracks to that I can hear the whole track without interruption.

This isn't too much of a problem in itself, but I would like to know how to mix the audio tracks from there on.  For example, if I've created 4 audio tracks on to a new project:  Woodwind, Brass, Percussion and Strings.... and everything's fine except where there's a horn playing against string accompaniment, I would like the horn to have a bit more volume.   How would I accomplish this?

You need to be a member of Composers' Forum to add comments!

Join Composers' Forum

Email me when people reply –

Replies

  • As soon as you bounce a few tracks down to audio the only editing you can do is editing the full audio file. If you mixed down the whole brass section to one track there is no way you can raise the volume of a horn without raising the volume on the whole section.

    The best you can do in a case like this is to render those solo instruments to their seperate audio track, than you can control the volume, panning etc seperately.

    If I were you I would try to render every instrument to it's own audio track as much as possible. This already will save a lot of ram as you change the instruments from a huge number of  multisamples ( aka small files triggering over and over in big numbers)  to a limited number of large files streaming from disk. This way you still have full control over the mix.

  • This sounds like a plan.  Go back before you mix your samples add volume to the horn then add the samples and remix.  :(

    Jonas Steur said:

    As soon as you bounce a few tracks down to audio the only editing you can do is editing the full audio file. If you mixed down the whole brass section to one track there is no way you can raise the volume of a horn without raising the volume on the whole section.

    The best you can do in a case like this is to render those solo instruments to their seperate audio track, than you can control the volume, panning etc seperately.

    If I were you I would try to render every instrument to it's own audio track as much as possible. This already will save a lot of ram as you change the instruments from a huge number of  multisamples ( aka small files triggering over and over in big numbers)  to a limited number of large files streaming from disk. This way you still have full control over the mix.

    Cubase 6
    Because I don't have enough RAM capacity on my computer to load up as many instruments/articulations as I wish to without bits of the music stutterin…
  • But that's exactly what I want to do.  Render a whole audio track's volume in different parts of the composition.  For instance, at the beginning of the track there is a horn solo against syncopated string pads.  Therefore, I would like to change the brass audio track, because only the horn is playing in that part, with no other brass instruments.

    Jonas Steur said:

    As soon as you bounce a few tracks down to audio the only editing you can do is editing the full audio file. If you mixed down the whole brass section to one track there is no way you can raise the volume of a horn without raising the volume on the whole section.

    The best you can do in a case like this is to render those solo instruments to their seperate audio track, than you can control the volume, panning etc seperately.

    If I were you I would try to render every instrument to it's own audio track as much as possible. This already will save a lot of ram as you change the instruments from a huge number of  multisamples ( aka small files triggering over and over in big numbers)  to a limited number of large files streaming from disk. This way you still have full control over the mix.

    Cubase 6
    Because I don't have enough RAM capacity on my computer to load up as many instruments/articulations as I wish to without bits of the music stutterin…
  • Ah well in that case you could automate the volume so the part is a bit louder at that point in the track. The cubase automation is pretty straight forward and explained in the manual. Maybe you already have experience using it. In case you have some questions about how to use the cubase automation properly feel free to ask though.
  • I presume the "automation" means the graph that you draw under each audio track.

    I use this to control changes in volume and also to quickly edit out any "mistakes" by dropping the volume right down at those points. If that's not enough, you'll have to make a separate audio track for one of the important instruments that you want full control over.

  • Speaking as a long time Cubase user - 15 years or so,  I always found working with big orchestral stuff problem laden, until I upgraded to a core i7 working in 64 bit.

    I dont know what your budget is like but this is the real way to solve your issues - as soon as you are able. I find Cubase 6 64 bit rock solid and I have never used more than eight gig even with a full orchestral template in tutti fully laden with articulations. The main issue is that in 32bit windows hogs half your ram and there is a hard limit on whats left which is way too small. The limit on 32 bit is something like 4 gig, whilst 64 bit its 128 gig or something silly like this.

    Its well worth moving up, but also check your drivers come in 64 bit.

    If you need to stick with 32 bit for a while think about unloading articulations you dont need and think about any RAM intensive processes such as convolution

  • Thanks ZeroZero,

    I'm not sure what 'i7' is, but I do actually 'try' to work with 64 bit.  My biggest problem, and it''s probably the biggest mistake I ever made in my life was to buy a computer that is quad-core but with only a 4 gig RAM capacity, which is a bit like driving a Ferrari in a school playground.

    Also, I keep having this problem with hanging notes, they drive me insane.  And it is as if the computer is able to decide when to trouble me with them, or just leave me alone, as I wish it would.

  • A core i7 is an intel CPU which set a certain standard - comes in may flavours, but at time it first hit the market it was faster than everytthing. There is now a processor called Xeon and the i7 range has now got six core processors.

    The core i7 was the first processor that could actually handle Cubase & Orchestras well IMO, without having to link computers etc.

     

    You might be able to replace your ram with something more powerful  - am not sure if we are talking PC laptop Mac or what.

    Depends on how many slots you have and what kind of slots. Its a five minute job if you know how, 30 minutes if you want to learn yourself. Snap out old snap in the new RAM.

     Hanging notes are generally a MIDI issue caused by the note ending message not being received. when you loop then you need to make sure that then end of the last notes are in the loop.  There is a reset button in Cubase.

    My guess is that you need to upgrade your RAM to at least eight gig then you can start enjoying yourself again :)

     

  • Another issue can be the operating system - if you have something like XP you wont be able to use more than 3.5gig Ram as it just wont address it properly, even though it will show four gig -

     

    Anyhow - the other option is to record your parts as midi then bounce them to audio when they are complete -

     

    If you need to adjust the volume on the horn you may be able to assign it to either a different output in Cubase (Depending on your Sound card) or move the slider up in the mixer on the audio track you need.

     

  • It seems that my biggest problem is hanging notes.  I've got windows 7, but only a 4 gig ram capacity, and an M-Audio Delta 2496 Sound Card.  But the hanging notes really are driving me up the wall.  But as ZeroZero said, it's the lack of RAM capacity that is probably the cause.  I have two 2gb slots.  However, I've been told that I would not be able to load 4 gig RAM sticks in to the slots.  It just doesn't work.  What I don't understand is, why make a computer that's got so much CPU to burn but with sod all RAM to burn it with?  I really screwed up buying this computer.

This reply was deleted.