Replies

  • I am a pianist - check a recording of the Etude I posted which though there are mistakes I think I did OK for such a difficult work.

    Well "pit stops"?   And fingering? No I am talking about quite basic things such as assigning notes to the left hand or right hand.  And I never think you should write music solely as a "pit stop".  Yes I get what you mean, you don't want to tire out the poor pianist but your piano part is not that hard. Really it isn't.  A first year college undergrad could pull this off pretty quickly.

    As for fingerings you are correct, that is usually left to editors or if the composer suggests an easier way of doing it.

    As for the bifocals I understand but then why not use a larger size score paper? And then there are ways of engraving such that it can be visible in addition to large manuscript paper. Have you used Barenreiter scores? They are an excellent model. 

    Since you imply you have worked with pianists, do you have an example of a finished score a performance of one of your works by orchestra and professional pianist?

    Also, what is the skill level of the pianist you are writing for? Maybe I am incorrect to assume this is not meant to be a highly virtuosic work?

    Here is an example of one of the finest openings for a piano concerto I know of at least and one of the most difficult - Prokofiev's 2nd piano concerto with a score: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoTgJJZ4lOo 

    Note the solution found here - a reduction of the orchestra part to another piano staff indicating instruments.  This could have been one option for a study score that reduces staves. Also note the nice detailed articulation when the texture in the piano is much sparser. Also around 5:50 note hos the ms and md indicate which hands to take the inner line.

    And here is an early Mozart Concerto which a well-trained high-school student or extremely talented (possibly prodigy) grade school could pull off - more commonly a high school junior or senior with very good training - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_q5QnK5k5U

    Also measure 15 and 16 is more appropriate for a harpsichord than a piano - the hands overlap on the same note - did you mean an octave higher in the right hand?

    I see from your bio you have participated in much music making and writing for performers so I am curious who this piece is for.

    PS. I don't like doing this but you can hear my playing of the piano at this thread - https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/etude-for-piano-1.  I am no virtuoso but I think I am capable.

    As for composition, I started as a little kid but only took it serious in my 40's pursuing a grad degree in composition right now.

  • Michael,

         I appreciate your broad knowledge of classical music and your witty replies, but I think this discussion got off to a bad start, so I am officially declaring it Ferneyhoughed (over).  Catch you next time.

    Lawrence
     
    michael diemer said:

     Yes, who was it that said "The times smell of sunset?"

     

    Kristofer N. Emerig said:
    What's eating people nowadays? Dunno - maybe we all intuitively sense the end of this paradigm is near.

  • Bob,

         I think you underestimate your own ability.  You should be writing musicals.  When my oldest daughter was in junior high she was in the musical "Jonah and the Whale."  Andrew Lloyd Weber?  It had great music, and dance scenes.  I especially liked the part where the kid in the fish suit tries to swallow Jonah.  Now that's entertainment. 
     
    Bob Porter said:

    I think that one of the many things that separate us from real composers like...say.. Mendelssohn, or any of a number of great composers, is that they new what their works would sound like, for the chosen orchestration, as they wrote them. Some worked out parts on the piano. Others just went out in the meadow and wrote out full scores.   

    "Cappricio" concerto for piano and orchestra.
    Composers' Forum is a social network
  • Kristofer,

         I always enjoy your posts and comments, but I don't like the direction of this thread.  You guys can go on discussing but I'm out of here.  Thanks for listening.

    Lawrence
     
    Kristofer N. Emerig said:

    Understood Ray. I knew your shrewd moderatorship would not phail-us. Sorry, my spelckek is acting up ugain.
     
    Raymond Kemp said:

    Please.............no politics or I'll have to place a few traffic cones in the lane of my choice :)
  • Christopher,

         This is the first half of the first movement of a three part concerto.  I'll post the second half in a few weeks and we can talk.  Some of your questions will be answered in the second half.

    Lawrence
     
    Christopher Sahar said:

    I am a pianist - check a recording of the Etude I posted which though there are mistakes I think I did OK for such a difficult work.

    Well "pit stops"?   And fingering? No I am talking about quite basic things such as assigning notes to the left hand or right hand.  And I never think you should write music solely as a "pit stop".  Yes I get what you mean, you don't want to tire out the poor pianist but your piano part is not that hard. Really it isn't.  A first year college undergrad could pull this off pretty quickly.

    As for fingerings you are correct, that is usually left to editors or if the composer suggests an easier way of doing it.

    As for the bifocals I understand but then why not use a larger size score paper? And then there are ways of engraving such that it can be visible in addition to large manuscript paper. Have you used Barenreiter scores? They are an excellent model. 

    Since you imply you have worked with pianists, do you have an example of a finished score a performance of one of your works by orchestra and professional pianist?

    Also, what is the skill level of the pianist you are writing for? Maybe I am incorrect to assume this is not meant to be a highly virtuosic work?

    Here is an example of one of the finest openings for a piano concerto I know of at least and one of the most difficult - Prokofiev's 2nd piano concerto with a score: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoTgJJZ4lOo 

    Note the solution found here - a reduction of the orchestra part to another piano staff indicating instruments.  This could have been one option for a study score that reduces staves. Also note the nice detailed articulation when the texture in the piano is much sparser. Also around 5:50 note hos the ms and md indicate which hands to take the inner line.

    And here is an early Mozart Concerto which a well-trained high-school student or extremely talented (possibly prodigy) grade school could pull off - more commonly a high school junior or senior with very good training - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_q5QnK5k5U

    Also measure 15 and 16 is more appropriate for a harpsichord than a piano - the hands overlap on the same note - did you mean an octave higher in the right hand?

    I see from your bio you have participated in much music making and writing for performers so I am curious who this piece is for.

    PS. I don't like doing this but you can hear my playing of the piano at this thread - https://composersforum.ning.com/forum/topics/etude-for-piano-1.  I am no virtuoso but I think I am capable.

    As for composition, I started as a little kid but only took it serious in my 40's pursuing a grad degree in composition right now.

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