Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

I made these scores to help me visualise the characters and their movements and behaviour.

Aarushi - Interactions: when she is conversing with Avyan as she takes him through the gardens of Vimana.

Aarushi - Beautiful Contradiction: She explains the flow of life to Avyan.

Samay - Scurry: describing the movements of a mouse

Views: 20

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

In a comment to another of your pieces I remarked "this isn't strictly my kind of music but...."

Seems I was wrong.

I found these fragments most enjoyable and interesting - and clever, given your absence of formal training. It shows how intuition alone can lead along delightfully musical paths. It almost defies belief that you've had no training at all so I suppose it's the however-many years of practice that's brought refinement, balance and a fine sense of timbre/colour.  

My impression leaned toward gamelan, particularly in #2 at about 42 seconds it became almost obvious. And #3, exuberant and playfully Ghibli, taking on deeper seriousness after about 1 minute.

In some ways these fragments exhibit the 'minimalist' style but melting into contrasting or extended motifs fairly quickly.

Most interesting: composing sketches to visualise/learn characters and their behaviour for a larger work - much as some authors write character "portraits" so they really get to know their characters, how they react and interact so they behave naturally in relation to each other in the novel. Fascinating. 

Very well done. 

.

  

Hi Dane,

I must say, I wouldn't hesitate in replacing my daily reads with your comments, analysis, and feedback. The way you articulate surely places you as a capable music journalist.

Thank you for your kind words, and I'm glad you're liking some of my works. I don't quite know where I get my style from, perhaps it has a semblance of uniqueness born of the fact that I am pretty tone deaf. Meaning, that I'm not influenced heavily by other artists.

And, as per your third point; I get the feeling it could be an unpopular opinion amongst film professionals, but I've always believed that it is the music that which makes the film. A good example: I don't believe that The Shawshank Redemption would be the same film without Thomas Newman's extraordinary score. And there are many more examples. But I grew up appreciating music and visuals in their harmonical best, and, thus, I am perhaps a result of such conditioning.

All the best

Hi Tarun,

You surely bring up some interesting points! 

I'm partially in agreement with you about film music - when there's 'synaesthesia' between the visual and musical; when their whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Alas it doesn't happen in every film and I've commented on this before: the music (just as the visual) has become so formulaic these days in Hollywood's output. It's so 'samey' - copy and paste - and becomes more an annoyance. An action scene comes on with the predictable effects - bangs and crashes, machine-guns blazing, people barking orders...and in comes the music: angry horns underpinned by trombones à 4; not long before violins noodling away above and the timps bashing away....just a mish-mash of sound in the end.

And yet films like 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' and 'Blade Runner' (No. 1) marry music and visual so well that you're right - neither music nor visual would stand without the other. 

Your own approach seems a most interesting prospect: music being the initiator of the film (as I see it). It's a way I'd like to work - spotting the film to a score rather than 'the usual' other way around.

Dan Elfman who did the Spiderman music talks about the corporatisation of film music in a brief chat with VSL. (9 minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=712ntdvBBTg

Thanks indeed for the discussion!

Keep well,

Dane.

Hi Dane,

I think you've hit the nail there. Perhaps, it is the over politicisation of films today - in a rush to churn out messages of political correctness, Hollywood has become a numb cauldron of ready-made plugins for filmmakers to put together; and they can't even get that right! Rather than give a platform to true filmmakers with interesting stories - which would naturally invoke a more creative approach by the composers, cinematographers etc. They are using films as a propaganda tool - which is always the destroyer of all things good.

Thank you for the video - I'll check it out.

All the best

Dane Aubrun said:

Hi Tarun,

You surely bring up some interesting points! 

I'm partially in agreement with you about film music - when there's 'synaesthesia' between the visual and musical; when their whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Alas it doesn't happen in every film and I've commented on this before: the music (just as the visual) has become so formulaic these days in Hollywood's output. It's so 'samey' - copy and paste - and becomes more an annoyance. An action scene comes on with the predictable effects - bangs and crashes, machine-guns blazing, people barking orders...and in comes the music: angry horns underpinned by trombones à 4; not long before violins noodling away above and the timps bashing away....just a mish-mash of sound in the end.

And yet films like 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' and 'Blade Runner' (No. 1) marry music and visual so well that you're right - neither music nor visual would stand without the other. 

Your own approach seems a most interesting prospect: music being the initiator of the film (as I see it). It's a way I'd like to work - spotting the film to a score rather than 'the usual' other way around.

Dan Elfman who did the Spiderman music talks about the corporatisation of film music in a brief chat with VSL. (9 minutes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=712ntdvBBTg

Thanks indeed for the discussion!

Keep well,

Dane.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service