A New Incendiary

Seeing as certain kindly people have sought to quell the recent conflagration caused by this critter, I thought I would throw a new incendiary in the mix. I see that we Westerners are resuming our ongoing dance of conviviality with our Middle Eastern friends, vis a vis youtube and certain hoedowns that have even taken on in Sydney. So this leads me to kind of ruminate upon the essence of the whole little fiasco:

Can't say that I've ever written anything directly political, insofar as musical ciphers go, but I did pen a minuscule triptych as an ode to religious ridiculousness - something to do with the ancient world, hum? It was motivated by a request to harmonise a certain traditional ditty for a serious music student, and, a certain feeling of disdain for the whole project in hand, you can see that things got a bit out of hand - kind of relevant to our current imbroglio.

Perhaps the youtube video will make the sad joke a bit more obvious:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA7Wmf6n-AY&feature=plcp

Beyond my paltry offerings, who do we nominate for penning the most powerful political essays, satires, in music?

Mark Nicol

The Dance of Jesus and Dawkins.mp3

a Dovstoevsky.mp3

a Grapelli Cziffra & Thornton.mp3

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  • I greatly appreciate the valuable service run by the administrators of Composers Forum, and I respect your right of censorship. I will abide by those terms.

    Mark Nicol.

    Raymond Kemp said:

    Friendly WARNING!

    In this forum, we may extol the virtues of our own political and/or religious views but never trash that of others.

    Live and let live or, the discussion board will be closed and/or deleted.

    End of story.........it's not up for debate.

    -

    Raymond Kemp (forum administrator)

    A New Incendiary
    Seeing as certain kindly people have sought to quell the recent conflagration caused by this critter, I thought I would throw a new incendiary in the…
  • Bob,

    Much as you may think so, I have absolutely no interest, whatsoever, in pushing people's buttons. You may want to look up the names, careers, and the histories of people like Pico Della Mirandola, Morelly, La Mettrie, Savronala, and push beyond a student's reckoning of what was at stake in the Reformation/Counter-Reformation, and Enlightenment. If we were not, in the West, lucky enough to live in an ostensibly Secular State, hard fought for and died for by many of the champions of Reformation and Enlightenment values, then none of us in the West would be enjoying the fruits of liberty and freedom of speech that we do. Nor would we be enjoying the fruits of the Industrial Revolution, because the proscriptive decrees that affected Copernicus and Galileo were omnipresent, and would have also killed off the scientific revolution that begat modern science and technology.

    Behind what you may see as facetious stirring, there is a very serious person here, who has spent the equivalent of 11 unpaid working years writing about human cultural evolution, our pending ecological crisis, and of ideological, political, economic, and educational means to create a better world for all creatures living upon this planet. Those who agitate for change, and agitate very strongly, they are never going to be soft and fuzzy in action , nor, hopefully, soft and fuzzy in cogitation.

    Believe me, Bob, I want to see a final end to religious warring upon this planet - not just because it is a travesty, but because it should also be seen as being embarrassingly mindless, and because it also diverts energies away from far more important things that all human beings should be attending to. But this warring will not end, not ever - I guarantee you, simply by patronising the outlooks of the ancient world. 

    One of the great double-edged blades begat by Enlightenment philosophy was the ideal of 'intellectual liberalism'. It may help us cut a swathe towards the truth. But it also allows us to frame and conform to 'liberal conceptions', to ideas that may be freely conceived, but which have no correlation with or concurrence with imperious natural facts. Within the thinking of modern Western science, there is no confutation of imperious natural order in nature - we earnestly seek just the natural facts. But in the domain of religious thinking, quite naturally enough, man has always, primarily, framed his thinking around what he wants to believe, what offers egoistic promise, rather than around what appears to be the natural truth. And I say this as a profoundly religious person, but, as one who would have no 'truck' with theism. (Nonetheless, I admire the position of Kant - scrupulously honest.) 

    The whole testament of the ancient world, anguished and struggling as it was, was one where, in retrospect, we might have looked back and seen the horrendous price that we paid for abiding by wishfully and egoistically conceived doctrinaire ideologies: the compact between the ancient autocrat and priest was paramount. Australia's culture is, in action, quite secular. But, almost universally in the West, the reasoning and values enshrined in Reformation and Enlightenment thinking have been lost, forgotten. And, the vacuity of atheist existentialism/nihilism contributing, now so many in the West want to re-run the reel of indulgent, wishful thinking. Via the tenets of pure liberal thinking, intellectual egalitarianism, this dangerous ideological regression is given quiet approval. 

    It might pay to get over the personality thing Bob, especially as you have no real read there. Just focus on the job at hand, and try working a lot, lot harder - as a thinker, as a musician. Democracy lets everyone have a say, the Internet is the most democratic forum conceivable. But only the most conscientious search for the truth, or expression, can rise above that convivial domain where, 'for now we see darkly'.

    In short, if you thought I was just trying to be facetious, re my posting or the Christmas Cards collection, you are living in that world of grave under-estimation which may well suit generic indolence. My best friend is an ardent Christian, but he understands my position, intuitively, very well. At heart you are a nice person Bob, but there are many tiers to the sophisticated moral being, and moral action becomes much, much more complex. Moral life is only simple - for the simple.

    Best wishes,

    Mark Nicol.

    Bob Porter said:

    It is easy to push peoples' buttons. I know folks who do so, and enjoy it. It's hard to be meaningful. Freedom of speech is not absolute. Sex and religion seem to be topics too hot for folks to handle. And put them together..... 

  • Bob,

    I don't think of you as inferior like you assume. But you need to realise your limitations just as much as I need to realise mine. I ain't gonna win any Mr. Nice Guy competition, and I realise and value the fact that you basically are. So, contrary to what I said or thought before, perhaps, when I am conversing with you and others, I should take greater note of the person and less of the subject matter at hand. Guess I was kind of brought up -'the job's important, that's the only thing that matters'. I apologise Bob, (and in the morning I'll be just as brutal as usual).

    I was doing a landscaping job yesterday, money to pay for my sins, and an old guy of 70 years spent so much time to help me just because he could see I was head down, arse up. Now there's someone to sing praises to, what we call in Australia a 'real good bloke'. The piece that I wrote, Ulysses, it ain't about any grandiose self-conception. It's dedicated to my childhood best friend, a bloody larrikin and prankster - my best buddy. His wife left him and he drank himself to death. But, like Leopold Bloom, I suppose, my mate Paul is still the biggest hero of my life - and I wish he and I could have sailed the high seas together. But that's part of the great function of art, mythology, creating the vista of a utopian world.

    Best wishes Bob,

    Mark Nicol.

  • Bob,

    resolve is a thing of great importance. That's precisely why you project a real identity. Did you like that show "My Name's Earl"? I loved it, but can't remember the title music - couldn't have been that good - no real identity. The 2nd. movement of Shostakovich's 10th., that's like me - all sweet and subtle, never hurt a fly.

    Have a good rest, you ain't got no sins.

    Mark.

  • Bob,

    I regret dropping so quickly out of brass brand at a young age. I was swiftly promoted to the intermediate band, and I was a terribly, terribly nervous, shy person. The band were the Australian champions, but would not compete with US calibre ones. Fredick was having a bit of a josh about a composer's funny name, and I haven't heard of Nelhybel before. Sounds like a cow, but does he have a good moo?

    Mark.

  • I'll look his music up and have a listen. I love the sound of a concert band too, and really regret my giving up the chance. Mr. Sousa created some great music, I fondly remember marching to it at primary school - and still listen to it when in the mood. Bernstein made a good Sousa recording. As far as brass music goes I have a lovely CD of Gabrielli - and for serious, symphonic brass - the Russian composers. Hey, has anyone listened to James Morrison on youtube "Snappy Too" yet? That will blow you away.

  • Hi Michael,

    rather than re-wrack my brain to provide you with a new synopsis of the analyses and arguments put forward in my work Rebirth: Towards a Living Vision for Mankind, (Volumes I, II, III) I will just upload a sampler. 

    You'll find it on the net also. If you interested, after looking at this, then we can go further. My publisher is Digital Print Australia. When reading Volume I I suggest you just skip the section synopses done in italics. It was a suggestion from a high profile academic and environmentalist author, David Shearer. He was in the process of assisting me to commercial publication, and I acceded to the section synopses idea, but then refused to tone down any arguments. One of his works is Green or Gone, and, in comparison to mine, its really like chalk and cheese. Anyway, reading the synopses, I think, really just diverts from a 'clear read', difficult as this is.

    Best wishes,

    Mark Nicol.

    Sampler - Rebirth I.doc

    Rebirth PDF Rear Page.doc

  • Thanks Mark, although I'm not sure how soon I'll be able to get around to reading (and digesting) the docs.  I was expecting more of an outline of your main concepts regarding what could be changed and how.

    I'll try.



    Mark Nicol said:

    Hi Michael,

    rather than re-wrack my brain to provide you with a new synopsis of the analyses and arguments put forward in my work Rebirth: Towards a Living Vision for Mankind, (Volumes I, II, III) I will just upload a sampler. 

    You'll find it on the net also. If you interested, after looking at this, then we can go further. My publisher is Digital Print Australia. When reading Volume I I suggest you just skip the section synopses done in italics. It was a suggestion from a high profile academic and environmentalist author, David Shearer. He was in the process of assisting me to commercial publication, and I acceded to the section synopses idea, but then refused to tone down any arguments. One of his works is Green or Gone, and, in comparison to mine, its really like chalk and cheese. Anyway, reading the synopses, I think, really just diverts from a 'clear read', difficult as this is.

    Best wishes,

    Mark Nicol.

    A New Incendiary
    Seeing as certain kindly people have sought to quell the recent conflagration caused by this critter, I thought I would throw a new incendiary in the…
  • Remember this is an internet forum - home of the 3-byte take. If you read just a small amount of the script you'll see that there is no way that a cursory synopsis can provide any proper insight into the analytical and projective mindset. Some very distinctive features, though:

    (1) The argument and detailing of a clear central course of moral trajectory and ascent enacted in human cultural evolution.

    (2) The argument that quantum-jump progressions in human volitional potentials, technological and teleological revolutions,  generate not only massive jumps in expressive potentials, but also, inevitably, new crises - such as our current ecological one, which then demand new quantum jumps in technological and teleological thinking.

    This leads to:

    (3) The advocacy for a new religious conception, the Theory of Native Divinity, which repudiates both the posits of theology and of 'materialistic existentialism'. This is adjoined to the call for institution of a new church, the Church of Native Divinity.

    (4) The advocacy for Meritocratic moderation/manipulation of Capitalist/Laissez-Faire economic institution. By degree, we tax practices harmful to ecological and/or humane interests into control or oblivion, we subsidise, where practically possible, practices beneficial to ecological and/or humane interests. Beyond this, we maintain the self-interest principle inherent to Capitalist design as the only naturally reliable dynamo of healthy economic activity. Imperatively, we tax the second child into oblivion - for the period of the next two hundred years.

    (5) The advocacy for the replacement of the Democratic vote franchise with a Meritocratic one. Simply put, Democracy endorses the political hegemony of the lowest common denominator - and we are today faced with a real existential, ecological, and moral crisis. If we are to put the highest levels of logical and moral intelligence into addressing this dilemma, or into addressing our political prerogatives - our moral destiny, we cannot have our whole volitional intelligence dragged down to this lowest common denominator. Surely, the abidance with Autocracy is long and best gone. But so must the emotional romance with Democracy be shed.

    (6) Recognising that modern man is but one part in three an intellectual genius - glowing in scientific and technological ingenuity, very poorly developed in religious and in philosophical thinking, there is a fundamental call for total reorientation of religious and philosophical thinking, a call for the total overhaul of all academic faculties vending in moral and in philosophical intellectualism.

    Beyond that, it's all just a cakewalk. Who will get on board, and you doubt if they will? Unfortunately, probably only when things get bad enough, when pure self-interest kicks in. At that juncture this treatise won't sound so unattractive. But for now, I call to the awakening of a New Moral Intelligentsia - that is, hopefully, a youth that might profoundly care about the whole destiny of life on earth - not just what's on the table and on the tube.

    Best wishes Mike,

    Mark.

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