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Hi all,

Here's my submission for this year's contest. (For the forum members who were not aware of the contest and the submitted pieces.)

The title is a little mysterious, but the listen will explain it (hopefully).

Jos

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Hi, Jos,

A likeable piece that can't hide shades of Debussy but remarkable that it must almost entirely be in whole tone of which there are only two scales.

Quite an achievement if I may say so. Nothing to criticise - the balance is good; all good.

Cheers,

Dane.

Hi Dane,

Thanks for your comment. I don't understand however what you mean by: "There are only 2 scales". There are only 6 whole tones in a scale, which makes it somewhat odd to harmonize, but you can build a full whole tone scale on every half tone step of a 'normal chromatic scale'. Which results in 11 scales... Of course, a number of them will overlap partly, but nevertheless...

It's fine that you liked the piece. The second movement will be totally different, in another less obvious scale.

Jos

Sorry to interfere, but this is not correct. There are 12 tones in the chromatic scale. 6 are used in a whole tone scale. Consequently, the other 6 form another whole tone scale. Together that's two scales. No other possibilities.

Which makes it an interesting scale. The chromatic difference between the two scales can be used in quasi modulations.

Nice piece, by the way!



Jos Wylin said:

Hi Dane,

Thanks for your comment. I don't understand however what you mean by: "There are only 2 scales". There are only 6 whole tones in a scale, which makes it somewhat odd to harmonize, but you can build a full whole tone scale on every half tone step of a 'normal chromatic scale'. Which results in 11 scales... Of course, a number of them will overlap partly, but nevertheless...

It's fine that you liked the piece. The second movement will be totally different, in another less obvious scale.

Jos

Hi Geert,

I see your point and you're basically right. At first I didn't see what Dane meant. But in terms of transpositional use, you can go in 11 directions, depending on the tonal basis you decide to use. Most of the notes will be the same, but in harmonic thinking, there can be a significant difference (the way you build the chords and their sequences) depending on the set tonal center. Here in that little piece, it didn't invite to go transposing anyway, because it's simply too short. It was difficult enough to make a musical point in such a limited duration.

Thanks for your comment and I'm glad you liked it.

Jos

Very interesting and enjoyable Jos. This has a modern sound and I notice that your other posted pieces seem more traditional, is this a new direction for you?  Great sound from the instruments, is this from an audio library?

Hi Ingo,

You're quite right. I normally write in a more 'classical' way, but some experiment can't harm and keeps me aware of all the other beautiful genres. The only things I don't like in music is atonal and sonic experiments (using all kinds of noises and instruments in an odd way).

This piece was entirely done with the VSL solo instruments (not Synchron, but the dry recorded ones).

Thanks for listening and commenting,

Jos

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