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Sorry, this is just .. strange.

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Comment by Kristofer Emerig on January 1, 2017 at 7:12am

I suspect the picture threw you off. Of course the grinning horse has no implicit nor subliminal significance in connection with the work presented, outside of the obvious suggestion that the work might possibly be a HAARP-like extension of Project COMBO, designed to liquefy your brain by reflecting neighing signals off the ionosphere.

Comment by H. S. Teoh on January 1, 2017 at 12:25am

I know it wasn't recorded in the countryside; it's just the temperament that evokes to me the sound of an out-of-tune farmhouse harpsichord. :-P

Comment by Kristofer Emerig on December 31, 2016 at 3:25pm

Nope. Sorry HS, but this was recorded at 200 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, nearly as far away from dusty farmhouses as the contrapuntal method of the piece offered is from the style of Bach.

Comment by H. S. Teoh on December 30, 2016 at 7:40pm

Sounds like an out-of-tune farmhouse harpsichord trying its best to sound like Bach. Very much evokes the image of being out being in the countryside in a farmhouse or cottage improvising on a dusty old wooden harpsichord.

Comment by Kristofer Emerig on December 19, 2016 at 7:59am

Comment by Kristofer Emerig 10 hours ago Delete Comment

Heiko,

The strangeness to which I was referring relates more to the composition structurally and some of the polyrhythmic features, but yes, the temperament is unique too (at least I'm not aware if its use in any historical record).

The temperament is one I've experimented with a bit lately. It's a hybrid consisting of a hexachord core of quarter comma mean tone (the white keys), and relative Pythagorean tunings of the enharmonic keys, ie, near perfect fifths to chosen white keys, instead of the perfect thirds expected in mean tone.

This produces a balanced, mixed palette of perfect thirds, just fifths, and some rather wolfish intervals, which is very much asymmetric, colourful, and downright pungent at times.

You can hear more of this temperament in this example, Fugue in A Polymodal, for comparison:

Fugue in A Polymodal

Comment by Heiko on December 16, 2016 at 6:35am

Sounds indeed somewhat unusual. How did you accomplish this? Is it a detuned harpsichord?

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