Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

Yes, I did say five.
You do not have to say why.
Just put them in order from favorite to fifth favorite.

1. Beethoven
2. Tchaikovsky
3. Frank *EDIT* Franck (sorry, I never spell his name correctly)
4. Liszt
5. Schubert

If your opinions differ (by that I mean if you hate a composer that someone else loves), please be civil in your arguments. That is more of a reminder for me than a request for you :)

 

Since I can still edit my list (hehehehe) I have a new one

1. Beethoven

2. Tchaikovsky

3. Strauss, R.

4. Shostakovitch

5. Barber for his Adagio (I've only heard that one piece by him)/ Mozart (For Sym. 40, Eine Kleine, violin+viola duets, Mass, and Requiem)

HM Liszt

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Chuckle.  I see you kinda like Rachmaninoff, Milan!  

I couldn't possibly list my five favorites, because I don't rank them that way.   For example, I recognize Beethoven's greatness, but I'm not drawn to listen to his music.  I wouldn't dream of going to a concert of all Beethoven sonatas.   But don't get me wrong - I love Beethoven.  It's just that there has been so much truly exciting music written since then. I'd rather hear the new music.  I already know what Ludwig is going to do.  So rather than list my five favorites, a list which would change daily, I'll list the five I most recently enjoyed listening to. 

1.  Sofia Gublaidulina - I especially like her "Glorious Percussion" and "Fairytale Poem"

2.  Bela Bartok - even his simple piano pieces fairly sizzle with excitement - the kids all adore Bartok, too.   I'm currently engrossed in the first movement of his "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta", a slow, delicious fugue which comes in on every scale degree and haunts the other movements.

3.  Villa Lobos - I've known him for quite a while, but after recently hearing his "Quatuor for harp, celesta, flute, saxophone" for the first time, my love affair with him was rekindled.  All his music is so inspiring to me!

4.  Scriabin - one of my students just wrote a great article about him, featuring his mustache (!).  I had forgotten how much I enjoy his Black Mass sonata.  Talk about atonal music that works!!   His is nothing like the 2nd Viennese - it's more like tones for mystics and lovers ..

5.  Ravel - the wonderfully dark and shivering pieces based on the poems by Stephan Mallarme - wonderful harmonies and idiomatic use of the instruments - what a masterful orchestrator

Yes, i love Rachmaninoff, i play his music, i started composing because of him... Now, my music don't have almost anything that looks like his music, but, i enjoy listening him everyday.

I must be in my "classical" period finally.  Years in the making.  I listed my 3 top Bach, Beethoven, Mozart because while not everything they wrote is equally good -- some I don't care for at all -- they wrote great works in so many different idiom, were so prolific and I've learned so much from them about how to put together musical ideas.  The Beethoven late string quartets are a pinnacle for me as is so much of Bach.  But I came to all of this fairly late in my life.  Earlier on in life I had strong preferences for more contemporary composers.  And there are so many good ones. You name many Julie.  I forgot to add Prokofiev to my list. 

Julie Harris said:

Chuckle.  I see you kinda like Rachmaninoff, Milan!  

I couldn't possibly list my five favorites, because I don't rank them that way.   For example, I recognize Beethoven's greatness, but I'm not drawn to listen to his music.  I wouldn't dream of going to a concert of all Beethoven sonatas.   But don't get me wrong - I love Beethoven.  It's just that there has been so much truly exciting music written since then. I'd rather hear the new music.  I already know what Ludwig is going to do.  So rather than list my five favorites, a list which would change daily, I'll list the five I most recently enjoyed listening to. 

1.  Sofia Gublaidulina - I especially like her "Glorious Percussion" and "Fairytale Poem"

2.  Bela Bartok - even his simple piano pieces fairly sizzle with excitement - the kids all adore Bartok, too.   I'm currently engrossed in the first movement of his "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta", a slow, delicious fugue which comes in on every scale degree and haunts the other movements.

3.  Villa Lobos - I've known him for quite a while, but after recently hearing his "Quatuor for harp, celesta, flute, saxophone" for the first time, my love affair with him was rekindled.  All his music is so inspiring to me!

4.  Scriabin - one of my students just wrote a great article about him, featuring his mustache (!).  I had forgotten how much I enjoy his Black Mass sonata.  Talk about atonal music that works!!   His is nothing like the 2nd Viennese - it's more like tones for mystics and lovers ..

5.  Ravel - the wonderfully dark and shivering pieces based on the poems by Stephan Mallarme - wonderful harmonies and idiomatic use of the instruments - what a masterful orchestrator

I like what Julie said below.

My favorite composers used to be Beethoven, Mahler, Prokofiev, Shostakovich and Stravinsky, a long time ago. At some point, I realized I had a strong Western bias in my musical preferences. So I gradually changed my listening habits, and de-conditioned myself. Later, my favorites became these five Turkish composers. I provided links for representative works. Notice the order. The composers are from earlier and earlier periods of time, as you go further down in the list. No. 1 is the most modern, in terms of style. The three at the bottom are all “Ottoman Empire” composers, writing in the older traditional Turkish styles, before there was Western influence.


1. Bulent Arel (23 April 1919 – 24 November 1990) [The most modern: Warning! Watch out! He worked with Edgard Varèse, and sounds a bit like Stockhausen]]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsNGUzYZv5c



2. Necil Kazim Akses (1908-1999) [Although he died later than Arel, his style is “older”)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAX36QPI4DA



3. Tanburi Cemil Bey 1873, Istanbul –1916, Istanbul)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbHPXCmNqDg&index=1&list=PL...



4. Tanburi Ali Efendi (1836–1902) (He was the teacher of No. 3, Tanburi Cemil Bey)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iX88lMLhwkU



5. Hammamizade İsmail Dede Efendi (1778–1846)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St7vVEJWNa4

Note this fifth one has lots of singing, with a small chorus in the Turkish language. Listening to “classical music,” such as that of these last three composers, is NOT considered an “elite activity,” in Turkey, and it very popular on many radio channels, and often referred to as “the people’s music” (Halk Musigi). Although it might sound like “Arabic music” at first to some, it actually has completely different scales, intervals and modes.










B Gray said:

I must be in my "classical" period finally.  Years in the making.  I listed my 3 top Bach, Beethoven, Mozart because while not everything they wrote is equally good -- some I don't care for at all -- they wrote great works in so many different idiom, were so prolific and I've learned so much from them about how to put together musical ideas.  The Beethoven late string quartets are a pinnacle for me as is so much of Bach.  But I came to all of this fairly late in my life.  Earlier on in life I had strong preferences for more contemporary composers.  And there are so many good ones. You name many Julie.  I forgot to add Prokofiev to my list. 

Julie Harris said:

Chuckle.  I see you kinda like Rachmaninoff, Milan!  

I couldn't possibly list my five favorites, because I don't rank them that way.   For example, I recognize Beethoven's greatness, but I'm not drawn to listen to his music.  I wouldn't dream of going to a concert of all Beethoven sonatas.   But don't get me wrong - I love Beethoven.  It's just that there has been so much truly exciting music written since then. I'd rather hear the new music.  I already know what Ludwig is going to do.  So rather than list my five favorites, a list which would change daily, I'll list the five I most recently enjoyed listening to. 

1.  Sofia Gublaidulina - I especially like her "Glorious Percussion" and "Fairytale Poem"

2.  Bela Bartok - even his simple piano pieces fairly sizzle with excitement - the kids all adore Bartok, too.   I'm currently engrossed in the first movement of his "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta", a slow, delicious fugue which comes in on every scale degree and haunts the other movements.

3.  Villa Lobos - I've known him for quite a while, but after recently hearing his "Quatuor for harp, celesta, flute, saxophone" for the first time, my love affair with him was rekindled.  All his music is so inspiring to me!

4.  Scriabin - one of my students just wrote a great article about him, featuring his mustache (!).  I had forgotten how much I enjoy his Black Mass sonata.  Talk about atonal music that works!!   His is nothing like the 2nd Viennese - it's more like tones for mystics and lovers ..

5.  Ravel - the wonderfully dark and shivering pieces based on the poems by Stephan Mallarme - wonderful harmonies and idiomatic use of the instruments - what a masterful orchestrator

Hmmm...no particular order, except Kate goes on top.

Kate Bush

Stravinsky

Mahler

Shostakovich

John Adams

These change all the time.

So for me, they are the last five composers I have (willingly) listened to.  (I didn't willingly listen to that terrible song broadcast over the supermarket sound system).

In other words, the last five composers, I chose to listen to.

I just look it up on my web browser history, and there they are.

Serge Prokofiev

J. S. Bach

Pierre Henry

All the Darmstadt School composers (except Boulez)

Mahler

(I might put Boulez in there, but I am "learning" to like him, or at least seeing if I can).

Sappho

Aeschylus

Romanus the Melodist

J. S. Bach

Vassilis Tsitsanis

(4 Greek and 1 German... not bad)

Yes Fred, but at least Tsitsanis very tenderly uses a lot of Arabic or Turkish words in his songs when he mentions his oriental lovers who apart from this Gioulbachar also include Zaira, Serah, Farinda etc.

That, I suppose makes him a bit of an Arab composer also. (but not Muslim, cause he was an agnostic).

 

Live performance of 1953 in fat Jimmy's tavern by the composer on bouzouki and Marika Ninou singing.

(audience participating in chorus can be heard - recording done by an amateur audience member on a tape machine of that day)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSwmH8iuShg

 

GIOULBAHAR

 

One magic night

I saw her in Missiri,

She was some fairy tale beauty,

sweet Gioulbahar.

 

CHORUS

Tied to your love (?)

tied to your oasis (?)

my flower, Gioulbahar,

Arab melody.

slowly, slowly,

you had told me that with kisses,

while I was holding you in my bosom.

 

A slave to her sweet kiss,

I am tied to her love, (sevda?)

I cry and I am nostalgic and painful,

I don’t forget Gioulbahar.

 

CHORUS (the same)

? = sorry, my knowledge of Arabic and Turkish is next to nothing + I cannot hear the exact words

Fredrick zinos said:

Shame on you Socrates, You did not mention even one Muslim composer.

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