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Here's my first attempt at putting up a work in progress—one not released in its final form to my adoring public. :-)

Originally, this piece was written for a wind quintet + trumpet, violin and cello. I've decided to transfer all the pieces scored for this odd ensemble into a completely standard wind quintet. Not only is the piece more likely to get performed, but the process of reduction allows for less sloppiness and sometimes brings out a clearer sound. It may also make it more fun for the performers, as they have more to do.

It's called One because it's supposed to be one of four matching fugues for wind quintet. I have Two written and am working on one that might become Three. Sometimes (often) a piece goes its own way and no longer makes a good match for One and Two, so it winds up as an independent piece.

The music sounds jazzy but I tend to think I write "classical" music. If nothing else, it's not jazz because it's not supposed to be improvised.

Update Jan 20, 2016: Here are the score and MP3, version 2:

One- Wind Quintet v2.pdf

One - Wind Quintet v2-transposed.pdf

One - Wind Quintet v2.mp3

Hear are the score and MP3, version 1:

One for Wind Quintet.pdf

One - Wind Quintet.mp3

For comparison, I happen to have an old version of the piece scored for the octet up on SoundCloud:

https://soundcloud.com/freixas/new-work/s-ZrsHd

This forum seems a lot less active than the Music Analysis and Critique. A recent thread there was for a work clearly in progress and received a lot of attention. If the posting languishes here, I may re-post in that forum.

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Hi, Robert,

Finally got around to trying out your modifications. It happens to not be the sound I'm looking for, but something to keep in mind. I actually know little about jazz chords and chord progressions. I looked up trichord, but couldn't really find a clear explanation. When I looked at the notes that comprised the accompaniment you added, it looks like it's a series of diminished 7th chords moving down and up by half-steps. It's an interesting sound.

Robert G. Nagel said:

VERY interesting. I'm no critic, so I'll just make this short. Using the concert pitch version you have provided, in the first measure, I would give the oboe the Eb, move the clarinet down a step to the Bb and give the bassoon the E natural below that (an octave higher that you have the C now). Then lower that chord a half step when the flute hits the second G. Then lower it again a half step when the flute hits the E. Then raise it a half step when the flute hits the C. Then raise it a half step again when the flute hits the Eb. Hold it over until the flute hits the third G in the second measure, where you would lower it a half step. Carry on from there in that vein. I tried this in Finale and it sounds the way I had imagined. This may be more strident than you prefer, but I use this chord progression from time to time in my jazz. They say that the trichord was known as the Devil's cord in Medieval times, but I like it anyway. Just my opinion, so use it to line a bird cage if that makes you happy. Cheers.

Hi Antonio,

In the example/suggestion that Robert provides, they are not diminished 7th chords.. But they are using a tritone as the lower two voices, with an interval of a fourth above that.  In the first chord, it could be seen as a c7-10 (or +9)..  It modulates down and up, as you say..

This idea of the tritone - is something you use at the end of the piece - the Gb… This is the 'blue' note of the scale -  It is sorta implied in the scale you use from the beginning.. C scale w/ the flatted 3rd and flatted 7th - (the Dorian scale)  - and also that e natural is mixed in as well, makes for a bluesy scale...

In the example/suggestion that Robert provides, they are not diminished 7th chords.. But they are using a tritone as the lower two voices, with an interval of a fourth above that.  In the first chord, it could be seen as a c7-10 (or +9)..  It modulates down and up, as you say..

Oops! You're right—not a diminished 7th.

You may have resolved a source of confusion on my part. You mention tritone and Robert says trichord. The definitions are different. According to Wikipedia, a tritone is a musical interval composed of three adjacent whole tones (confusingly, it seems to consist of four notes), whereas a trichord is a group of three different pitch classes found within a larger group (I read the latter to mean it's a chord with three notes, none of which duplicate the others in pitch).

The "devil's interval" is related to the tritone, not the trichord.

I'm weak on theory, I'll admit. I compose mostly by instinct. I realized that I was inserting a jazzy feel by switching the E between natural and flat. But I really didn't pay attention to the key that much—it's F Major or D Minor, right? Well, probably not. What key is it in?

It does seem to be based on C, as you say. The piece ends on a C, which I was taught was the strongest clue to selecting the root of the scale (but not always, of course). With Bb and Eb, it becomes C Dorian, without the Eb, it's Myxolidian.

I would say that 'C' is the root key of your piece - but an 'altered' C scale..

No this is not jazz, even if there is the blue note. 

The piece starts with a wonderful birdsong-like phrase repeated over the different iinstruments. It is a really good piece, it develops nicely but the ending was a little abrupt.

Which ending? Version 1, version 2 or both?

Per-Erik Rosqvist said:

The piece starts with a wonderful birdsong-like phrase repeated over the different iinstruments. It is a really good piece, it develops nicely but the ending was a little abrupt.

My mistake, I read through your first post a little too quickly and clicked the soundcloud-link without realizing it was the older version. The trumpet was a surprise, as the it was composed for woodwinds..

Now I've listened to v2, and I still think the ending is not resolute. The reason (which is not a fact) is the last phrase that 

sounds as if it is a passage that will continue the piece. v1 is simpler and monophonic, but better an ending, in my view. It could be added a polyphonic phrase on the basoon or other, keeping the same rythm as the phrase of v1.



Antonio Freixas said:

Which ending? Version 1, version 2 or both?

Per-Erik Rosqvist said:

The piece starts with a wonderful birdsong-like phrase repeated over the different iinstruments. It is a really good piece, it develops nicely but the ending was a little abrupt.

Now I've listened to v2, and I still think the ending is not resolute.

I appreciate your taking the time to listen to the various versions and explaining why you perceive an abrupt ending, and your vote on the preferred ending. Thanks so much.

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