Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

I am new to this forum, so I thought I would go ahead and share my project from the 2016-2017 academic year. I have not yet had it performed, and the MIDI recording does have several inaccuracies, including one incorrect note close to the end of this movement due to its lack of wanting to play a high E on violin playbacks. Among the first of my completed works, this project was a study in form, counterpoint, harmonic function, and 19th century style:

Violin Sonata No.1 - I Audio

Score

Constructive criticism, thoughts, and comments are welcome! This work has been submitted to several competitions, and has been awarded multiply titles, including Honorable Mention in the 2017 TI:ME competition. I recently submitted it for further feedback to the NextNotes Highschool Composition Awards. I am working on pieces in a more contemporary style at the moment, though thoughts and feedback are always open to my consideration. 

Views: 233

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Emily,

Yes, split the beaming as you have surmised.

Regarding bowing, I would encourage you to consider it more so, especially if you start getting more performances of newer works. I understand your point of view, but the more information you can give to a performer, the more your intention becomes clear. Yes, a performer may well change a bit here and there, but will be doing so from a more informed position as to your musical intent. Too many composers think bowing is not their responsibility, but that is not true and you have a great advantage over a lot of composers as you are a violinist.

As you know, the correct bowing will enhance your musical phrase and produce a desired expressive result. If you progress further in composition (and I hope you do), I would also encourage you to think from the outset about bowing in order to manipulate it to its maximal effect when actually composing. Exploiting bow effects is a vast creative resource, but has to be factored in from the start.

I don't need to tell you that bowing becomes even more important in ensemble playing and what I have just written holds true there too - if bowing is altered, the leader and conductor are at least clear from what bowing one has incorporated as too the musical intent.

I look forward to your next piece with great interest and well done again on the upcoming performance - do you think you can get it recorded?

mikehewer.com


Emily F. Singleton said:

Hi Mike, 

Thank you for you notes! Do you mean to split the beam between beat three and four, to divide the beats for clarity? There are several spots this would make sense, though do to my limited experience with Finale software I had not figured that out yet. I will go back and make that adjustment now. Thank you for bringing it back to my attention!

On the topic of bowings, less is more in most cases I have found. The bowings in the part are as I played it, and generally how I felt it should flow. In the end, it is entirely up to the performer, so I did not feel the need to take a lot of time worrying over what to slur and what not to slur. I am still getting used to writing for piano, and although I have played piano for a while now, I did not feel the need to add phrasing marks into this piece. I had thought over it at one point during the editing process, but in the end I decided it was unnecessary. 

Once again, thank you for your comments!

Mike Hewer said:

Bars 2 + 6 after D, 3rd and 4th beats - you should beam the piano RH as dotted quaver and semiquaver followed by 4 semiquavers, always best to keep it simple if possible I've found.

I see you play violin and am curious as to why there is minimal bowing in the violin part.  On a similar theme, was it a conscious decision to not put phrasing slurs in the piano part too?

Mike

mikehewer.com

Yes, it will be recorded. I will continue to work on bowing my compositions, as it is most certainly an important skill to have. As I write more music I will try to incorporate further bowing techniques and be more detailed in such instruction. Right now I am writing a project that includes cello, so I think this will be a good place to start. Most of the time, at least  as a student, your music has already been bowed by good editors, and there is very little need for you to write your own bowings, thus leading to a lack of skill in this area. 

Thank you again!

Mike Hewer said:

Regarding bowing, I would encourage you to consider it more so, especially if you start getting more performances of newer works. I understand your point of view, but the more information you can give to a performer, the more your intention becomes clear. Yes, a performer may well change a bit here and there, but will be doing so from a more informed position as to your musical intent. Too many composers think bowing is not their responsibility, but that is not true and you have a great advantage over a lot of composers as you are a violinist.

As you know, the correct bowing will enhance your musical phrase and produce a desired expressive result. If you progress further in composition (and I hope you do), I would also encourage you to think from the outset about bowing in order to manipulate it to its maximal effect when actually composing. Exploiting bow effects is a vast creative resource, but has to be factored in from the start.

I don't need to tell you that bowing becomes even more important in ensemble playing and what I have just written holds true there too - if bowing is altered, the leader and conductor are at least clear from what bowing one has incorporated as too the musical intent.

I look forward to your next piece with great interest and well done again on the upcoming performance - do you think you can get it recorded?

mikehewer.com

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2018   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service