Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

As always, this piece is inspired by Antonio Vivaldi. However, I've included my own style too. I hope you can here the contrast because I can. Please comment on any improvements I could make to this piece. 

Thank you.

https://soundcloud.com/user305636706/bb-major

Views: 195

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Your pieces are getting better my friend. There are some chapters right out of Vivaldi's playbook. I would suggest that this is not a violin concerto though. It is more of a concerto for strings with violin obbligato. Baroque concertos (and Vivaldi in particular) offer dialogue between soloist(s) and ripieno.

Also, Vivaldi was a great virtuoso and, in addition to being splendidly melodic, his concertos are showpieces. I don't know what your background is in terms of being a musician, but you should spend some time thinking about how to exploit the (considerable) technical capabilities of the violin if you're going to write concertos in the style of Vivaldi.

I agree on all points--including that it's a great piece.  I'm a violinist, and the part is very easy.  I can hear the solo in the recording, but I can't find it in the score.  Is it mixed in with the first violin accompaniment part?

Is this the first movement? Should the movement show some kind of harmonic progression like later concertos? It starts in Bb and goes on and on in Bb. At some point it sneaks in to F, to quickly return to Bb at 1:08. Then it continues in G minor and to my ears finds its way back to Bb in a rather clever way. But the first part, until 1:08. Shouldn't that establish the F major? Just asking. I'm no expert on Vivaldi. But Bach had already in his music the idea of moving from I to V, which became later essential in the sonata form.

Thanks for listening.

This is indeed the first movement. I initially had written the Basso continuo because I play the Harpsichord and I like to improvise a lot on it. I then adapted the Ripieno and the 'solo' violin - which someone suggested is more obbligato than a solo. Could you please elaborate the point about Bach's idea of moving from I to V?

-I'll go back and make the 'solo' more challenging.

-Establish the F major before 1.08

-Expand the G minor

-Make the modulations more obvious perhaps?

Forgive me, I'm still learning! You're much more likely to be correct than me. So I'll take your advice on board.:)


Johan Halmén said:

Is this the first movement? Should the movement show some kind of harmonic progression like later concertos? It starts in Bb and goes on and on in Bb. At some point it sneaks in to F, to quickly return to Bb at 1:08. Then it continues in G minor and to my ears finds its way back to Bb in a rather clever way. But the first part, until 1:08. Shouldn't that establish the F major? Just asking. I'm no expert on Vivaldi. But Bach had already in his music the idea of moving from I to V, which became later essential in the sonata form.

This is more obbligato as the user above you pointed out. I'll work on the violin solo now.

Mitchell Cloutier said:

I agree on all points--including that it's a great piece.  I'm a violinist, and the part is very easy.  I can hear the solo in the recording, but I can't find it in the score.  Is it mixed in with the first violin accompaniment part?

Vivaldi said:

Could you please elaborate the point about Bach's idea of moving from I to V?

I suppose you are familiar with using I, IV, V for tonic, subdominant and dominant. In this case they correspond to Bb, Eb and F major chords.

I could point out a lot of Bach's works, where the piece starts in I and advances to V. After that it makes usually a repeat from the beginning, then it continues in V briefly, to advance to other harmonies and further back to the tonic, usually through the subdominant. Air on G string is one. And an absolute masterpiece on harmonic development is Bach's violin concerto in A minor, the 2nd movement. If you listen to that, I guess you can easily find the point, where the V is established. After that comes the very bold development through a lot of diminished chords.

And what about Vivaldi's Spring concerto, 1st movement. The main theme goes two times in I (with the birds inbetween). Then it advances to V. You hear the main theme in V before the thunder, rain and lightnings. Then comes the main theme in ii (minor) and finally in I.

The essential thing in the sonata form is the harmonic development through the whole piece. Though the baroque composers hadn't established the sonata form yet, you can still see the harmonic ideas in their works. The sonatas which are in a major key go from I to V. Those in a minor key go from i to III (to the parallel major key). The latter you find in Bach's Minuetto in G minor (from Anna Magdalena's book).

I like this, very much. you have a pretty good sense of what Vivaldi is all about, and how to use his style.

BUT...

If this is truly a concerto, there would be a solo part, as Mr. Brien mentioned above. So this is not a Violin concerto, it is more like a Concerto Grosso of sorts. Thank you for sharing this, i really enjoyed this.

Best,

Quinn Mason

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service