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Hi! I am glad to post my new work with the video, that shows the whole process of composing it in a fast-forward mode.

In this track, like in others this year I am moving from the concept of simple repetitions, that I often used in the previous tracks. Now if I reuse any material, I modify it, making the whole piece not only a meditative pleasure full of repeats, but also more rich in information, when listening to every minute brings something new.

In the sheet music I highlighted notes that were creating dissonances with red and notes that were not used in any dissonances with green.

The other new concept in this track is the inversion of classical harmonic principle: I tend to use dissonances for downbeat and long times, while allowing some consonances in passing notes.

When composing this track I created a first voice (flute or violin) and then built other voices adding consonances or dissonances.

Here I use three libraries, each of them producing interesting sound.

All three libraries support legato speed control and thus needed a lot of tweaking of note starts. The result is plenty of hand-shifted note starts, creating a more live groove.

Spitfire Flute Consort includes three short note lengths, which is not very common in today's libraries and which sounds realistic.

8dio adagio violin has many different legato types, which decreases machinegun effect significantly.

Tina Guo library is very melodious and does not need much additional CC dynamics tuning for long notes. I had to move cello notes to the left more than other instruments because of long attacks. Yet cello still sounds a little bit after the tempo. I did not correct it further, because bass in large spaces can be delayed. 

Libraries used:
8dio - Adagio Strings (Strings) [Violin]
Cinesamples - Tina Guo Cello (Strings)
Spitfire - Flute Consort (Woodwinds)

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Finally got to this. Sorry for the long wait...

Overall, this is quite well done... the melodies are diatonic, but the harmony is modern, giving an interesting modern sound that's at the same time quite tonal. In many places it reminded me of Shostakovich.  I liked the opening sequence of a lush, slower passage (first 45 seconds or so), following by a bright, lilting section that draws the listener in quite effectively.  There are several episodes in between, varying between contemplative, meditative moods and the return of the brighter theme, basically the main theme returning in various guises and forms, never exactly repeated, and variously treated.  The last section, starting at around 4:12, is a bit darker in mood, with fluttertongued flute, an interesting effect to end with. The ending, although not strong, seems to work well enough.

There wasn't a very strong dramatic arc, which makes it rather relaxing to listen to. Nevertheless the fact that no repetition is ever identical manages to retain interest throughout.

I'm not well-versed in the production side of things, so I'll leave that for somebody more skilled to comment. (Maybe Rodney?)

Hi Alexey,

I liked your piece. It is interesting how you approached composing this… And I quite enjoyed watching your thought process - as you displayed.. 

Each repeat does indeed bring a fresh approach.  

I felt that the flutter tongue at the end sounded more a transitionary element to a next section, to my ear.

Nicely done, Alexey.

gregorio

H. S. Teoh, thank you for your analysis. I really tend to create either abrupt or smooth endings. I think, in this track I could continue working in style and create tonal cadence ending with modern harmony elements. But I did not want to create one-style piece, so I added a little of other style in frullato section.

H. S. Teoh said:

Finally got to this. Sorry for the long wait...

Overall, this is quite well done... the melodies are diatonic, but the harmony is modern, giving an interesting modern sound that's at the same time quite tonal. In many places it reminded me of Shostakovich.  I liked the opening sequence of a lush, slower passage (first 45 seconds or so), following by a bright, lilting section that draws the listener in quite effectively.  There are several episodes in between, varying between contemplative, meditative moods and the return of the brighter theme, basically the main theme returning in various guises and forms, never exactly repeated, and variously treated.  The last section, starting at around 4:12, is a bit darker in mood, with fluttertongued flute, an interesting effect to end with. The ending, although not strong, seems to work well enough.

There wasn't a very strong dramatic arc, which makes it rather relaxing to listen to. Nevertheless the fact that no repetition is ever identical manages to retain interest throughout.

I'm not well-versed in the production side of things, so I'll leave that for somebody more skilled to comment. (Maybe Rodney?)

Gregorio, thanks for your post. I like that this collection of screenshots is interesting to you. This flutter tongue section is strange and unexpected. Frankly speaking, I cannot help adding such transitions :)

gregorio X said:

Hi Alexey,

I liked your piece. It is interesting how you approached composing this… And I quite enjoyed watching your thought process - as you displayed.. 

Each repeat does indeed bring a fresh approach.  

I felt that the flutter tongue at the end sounded more a transitionary element to a next section, to my ear.

Nicely done, Alexey.

gregorio

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