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Will there ever be another Bach/Beethoven? Will the siren call of Hollywood money dilute the talent pool, thereby eliminating that possibility?

Does anyone even want to be Bach/Beethoven? (Or even Gershwin, for that matter).

Pure compositional greatness largely divorced from 'soundtrack necessities' (like total time, bombast, cliche, etc)...orchestral music with structural power and beauty...classical formalism filled with real musical surprise and wonderment...is this all just a thing of the past?

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Dave,

No offence was taken mate. I couldn't really agree more with you and the point you've just made about being known and paid for a way of writing is a powerful rejoinder to anyone who thinks film music is a prostitution. I too have had to write shite in order to pay the bills, but I did get to a point where I was asked to work on what I was considered good at, which coincided with what I enjoyed best. 

It is probably a truth that the greatest film music was written by composers whose personal voice of self-expression tallied with the requirement of the brief.

New York Times Reporter: Tell me Mr. Rachmaninov, what inspired you to compose your famous prelude in C # minor?”

 

Rachmaninov:  $500.00

I got £500 for 30 seconds of crap doing demos on commercials in the 90's, Rachmaninov needs to change his agent, as I didn't have to use a quarter of the chords he used and definitely no black notes.....
I made a couple of quid myself from the late '80's through the naughties just by sequencing others work and.......I'm not embarrassed in the slightest. Even though I can suit myself now when it comes to creating music, I still like a good tune.

I don't think anyone's saying there exists no music that was written purely or primarily for the love of it. I'm saying that getting money out of it doesn't sully the love by default. The only paid work I'm still pursuing at the moment is a series of folk-western, mainly acoustic themes for a game. So much fun.

Fredrick zinos said:

New York Times Reporter: Tell me Mr. Rachmaninov, what inspired you to compose your famous prelude in C # minor?”

 

Rachmaninov:  $500.00

I quote:

"...this is yet another nonentity with nothing musical to offer us so they masquerade as an intellectual commentator."

"The argument is just tarted-up elitism."

With all due respect, I joined this forum for the enjoyment of open discussion...after being attacked for offering my opinion, I'll take my opinions (and honest questions) elsewhere.

In a forum containing at least one person who's scored film and other people who want to, and various who have worked or continue to work in the field of media music, you said - paraphrasing - "what you're doing is of less worth than other things you could be doing, and cannot contain power and wonder." You phrased it as a question but it's clearly an opinion. You led with an attack, so if you're not capable of dealing with the consequences and only welcome "open discussion" (what else is this thread if not open discussion) that agrees with you, perhaps you should go elsewhere.

You're not even interested in dissecting the attacks (otherwise known as criticism or debate) which makes it even more worthless.





Josh Tucker said:

I quote:

"...this is yet another nonentity with nothing musical to offer us so they masquerade as an intellectual commentator."

"The argument is just tarted-up elitism."

With all due respect, I joined this forum for the enjoyment of open discussion...after being attacked for offering my opinion, I'll take my opinions (and honest questions) elsewhere.

Josh. I agree with Dave. Don't let the door hit you in the ass on your way out.

In science and music most of the greats stand on the shoulders of their predecessors with a few exceptions.  Once in a century someone comes along, seemingly from nowhere, and advances the discipline by a light year.  In Science the list is short, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.  In music we have Bach, to a lesser extent Beethoven and in my book Ravel.  Bach is great in that in near isolation he invented western music with only a few instruments, a harpsichord and choir.  Beethoven's greatness lies in the fact that he was first to expand the orchestra and invent the modern symphony, though I believe there are many modern composers who have eclipsed Beethoven's work.  Ravel changed the way we view piano music and bridged the gap between classical and modern music. There will be another great composer of this magnitude, but probably not in our life times.

   

 Money probably has little effect on greatness in the composing world, or even in art or science.

I think we have to come to grips with the fact that film composing is a new genre and can't be compared to symphony composing.

  

Classical composition will prevail but in a new evolved form.  All art forms are cyclical.  We passed through an ultra modern/avant garde period in the sixties and seventies and are now trending back to classical norms.

    

A few weeks ago I would have said it is great to choose a mentor, but why John Williams?  Certainly there are better composers.  But now I realize that if you are intending to write for film there is no better example of a great film composer than John Williams. Undoubtedly there will be better film composers, but he is the first great film composer.
 
Dave Dexter said:

film.

And even if the scene you're scoring is the one where Supreme Leader Andjdsdfjklnss orders the attack on the Fggjgooo homeworld and everyone farts and gets their dick out, that doesn't mean the music cannot have power or cannot exist divorced; just as music written for ballet, opera and stage can and does exist entirely independent of the original context.

The argument is just tarted-up elitism, but then this is a composer forum and I should long ago have ceased being surprised.

Josh, don't be so fragile. An open discussion filled with diverse opinions can be very enlightening.

I have yet to see 'composer types' agree on much of anything.

I don't believe that money corrupts the idea of 'absolute' music. It may only 'persuade' talented individuals

away from reaching a 'greater' potential.

Any genre may set the parameters, but it  doesn't have to limit creativity.

Lawrence said, classical music will prevail... well, good music will prevail even though the

pendulum may swing in and out, there is still a natural core that will remain intact.  RS

" John Williams. Undoubtedly there will be better film composers, but he is the first great film composer."

Poor old Bernard Herman, Dimitri Tiompkin and Mr. Korngold. Etc. etc....

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