Composers' Forum

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The main requirements towards producing interesting music in any genre!

We can argue for days, weeks or eternity about, good or bad genre of music. Personal taste seldom alters although taste can and does change with age and experience but imho, there are a couple of things truly critical when creating music as a listening experience regardless of genre.

1. Dynamic range (as wide a variation as possible).
2. Timbre (changing over time).
3. ?

What do you think? Have you listened to performances of others that you 'should' be using as reference when producing your own work?
It's not just about the form and theory as that necessitates the listener imagining the same sound you're hearing in your head. If you start with a score then put every mark in there needed to tell the performer be they human or software application exactly what your intentions are. I really do not enjoy telling anyone their piece sounds crap just to get the reply 'but this is only a rough guide and I hope to have real players use it'. No it isn't because you've published it for the world to listen. It is an example of your lack of skill.

Yes I know, I'm BAD but please give us all your thoughts.

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""There are no definitive histories," writes Elijah Wald, in this provocative reassessment of American popular music, "because the past keeps looking different as the present changes."

"As its blasphemous title suggests, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll rejects the conventional pieties of mainstream jazz and rock history. Rather than concentrating on those traditionally favored styles, the book traces the evolution of popular music through developing tastes, trends and technologies--including the role of records, radio, jukeboxes and television --to give a fuller, more balanced account of the broad variety of music that captivated listeners over the course of the twentieth century. Wald revisits original sources--recordings, period articles, memoirs, and interviews--to highlight how music was actually heard and experienced over the years. And in a refreshing departure from more typical histories, he focuses on the world of working musicians and ordinary listeners rather than stars and specialists. He looks for example at the evolution of jazz as dance music, and rock 'n' roll through the eyes of the screaming, twisting teenage girls who made up the bulk of its early audience. Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and the Beatles are all here, but Wald also discusses less familiar names like Paul Whiteman, Guy Lombardo, Mitch Miller, Jo Stafford, Frankie Avalon, and the Shirelles, who in some cases were far more popular than those bright stars we all know today, and who more accurately represent the mainstream of their times. 

Written with verve and style, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock 'n' Roll shakes up our staid notions of music history and helps us hear American popular music with new ears.

"parse-snips :>}"

You know, that's not bad.

"When are you going to grow up and realize that you aren't perfect either?"

Hard though it is to accept I've failed the Stancill Metric, I sincerely hope I never grow up. I hope I'm still giggling at the London underground station "Cockfosters" when I'm 90. Maybe you'll have written some more music by then.

https://www.amazon.com/How-Beatles-Destroyed-Rock-Roll/dp/019975697X

Yes, Mr. Elijah Wald says, (a reduction of course) that things became 'black' (music) and White (music)...

I say video killed the radio star, and before that, the radio/record star killed - having to go hear music live, or play it oneself, which most folks could to some degree......   

Of course (to me, anyway) the 70's represent a great confluence of influences… (It is just a general point he's making, and marking a certain turning point (1950's) of the fractioning of popular music into different camps, for different audiences..

Socrates Arvanitakis said:

Hi Gregorio.

Please give a link if you have, although I don’t believe the title for a moment… perhaps it should have been "How R & R could not follow, or could not be the same after Beatles".

To destroy a think is to kill its spirit, and though some very mediocre pop musicians of the 70s & 80s are a bit responsible, the main culprits (as always are politicians and the societies who vote for them) in the USA Reagan and in the UK Thatcher killed Rock n' Roll, imo, that is.



gregorio X said:

On a related note, a very interesting book of the popular hits of the last hundred years is "How the Beatles destroyed R&R"

Yes, the title is incendiary.. (marketing)…  but he tries to make an interesting point - 

dave, this is just another example of 'apples to oranges' and a twist of intended meaning.
Hard though it is to accept I've failed the Stancill Metric, I sincerely hope I never grow up. I hope I'm still giggling at the London underground station "Cockfosters" when I'm 90. Maybe you'll have written some more music by then.

Not that it matters much, but I wish I had more time to write music.

Just for context, I live in Montgomery Co. Maryland.(USA)  I am a self employed(own my own business)- 42 yrs.-

Home Improvements contractor. I love what I do.... but the ever increasing property taxes here are unbelievable.

This year my property taxes exceed $ 8,000.00. That means that I have to work 'overtime' to maintain my lifestyle here.

That is life in the big city, as they say. I could move, but I don't really want to yet.

Thus, I have much less free time to devote to my hobbies and other interests. i.e. music

I view your nagging that I write more music as a cheap shot and callous. I, wish I could.

ps- there is a difference between 'child like' and childish. Can you parse that?

Roger - No matter how bad things get in Maryland, remember this - you've always got crab cakes.

Amen to that brother. Ya can't beat Maryland Blues and a plate full of Chesapeake Bay oysters.

That's some goooood pickin'.  RS
 
Boot Hamilton said:

Roger - No matter how bad things get in Maryland, remember this - you've always got crab cakes.

To be fair to Roger, he has submitted entries to the past few contests run by Gav, and I enjoyed at least a few of them enough that one of them almost made my list for 3rd place. Unfortunately other entries won out.  He can't be doing that badly if he appealed to picky ol' me! ;-)

We all have our cross to bear. Just for context. I live in San Diego county, California. Darn expensive. I work two jobs. Just had to replace two cars and have a daughter in college. Said daughter is directing a play for which I am donating the time to design and run lighting and sound. I'm also writing music for it. An overture, entr'acte, battle music, and bows. 

Either you love to compose and find a way to do it. Or you sit back and tell others what they shouldn't bother to do.

Besides which Roger can't have 3rd place because I own 3rd place.

"I view your nagging that I write more music as a cheap shot and callous"

Good.

"there is a difference between 'child like' and childish. Can you parse that?"

No.

Thanks for that HS.      When I first joined up here I did submit a few pieces on the main page

for review and feedback. The response was, in a word 'underwhelming' and basically useless.

At that point I decided to simply enter pieces on My Page and leave it at that.

The contests were a different thing, and the most fun here.

To date I have 26 'compositions' listed. Hardly prolific, but like I've said before, it's a hobby for me,

not a career... or an addiction   lol

Presently, I have 2 projects I am working on when I can find the time- but it takes more than just

time, it also takes focus and being in a 'creative frame of mind' so to speak.

Bob P.  The 'advice' I  'offered' to Erwin was sound and sage advice.

I noticed that he revised his effort, and also noticed the vast attention it was getting. It is about to

slip of the main page into oblivion without a single comment. Say what ????
 
H. S. Teoh said:

To be fair to Roger, he has submitted entries to the past few contests run by Gav, and I enjoyed at least a few of them enough that one of them almost made my list for 3rd place. Unfortunately other entries won out.  He can't be doing that badly if he appealed to picky ol' me! ;-)

The words of an imbecile wholly, perhaps deliberately, unaware of his surroundings.

"The 'advice' I  'offered' to Erwin was sound and sage advice.

I noticed that he revised his effort, and also noticed the vast attention it was getting. It is about to

slip of the main page into oblivion without a single comment. Say what ????"

Roger,

You told Erwin to not write for harpsichord because it is a dead instrument. Only later, after someone complained, did you say anything of value. 

Actually you called it a dinosaur. Perhaps we shouldn't write for violin, flute, oboe, and guitar, to name a few instruments that have been around just as long.

I'm glad to hear you have some projects going. Hope you can make some time for them.

I also hope you don't mean to come across the way you do. Words matter. Use them carefully.

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