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The main requirements towards producing interesting music in any genre!

We can argue for days, weeks or eternity about, good or bad genre of music. Personal taste seldom alters although taste can and does change with age and experience but imho, there are a couple of things truly critical when creating music as a listening experience regardless of genre.

1. Dynamic range (as wide a variation as possible).
2. Timbre (changing over time).
3. ?

What do you think? Have you listened to performances of others that you 'should' be using as reference when producing your own work?
It's not just about the form and theory as that necessitates the listener imagining the same sound you're hearing in your head. If you start with a score then put every mark in there needed to tell the performer be they human or software application exactly what your intentions are. I really do not enjoy telling anyone their piece sounds crap just to get the reply 'but this is only a rough guide and I hope to have real players use it'. No it isn't because you've published it for the world to listen. It is an example of your lack of skill.

Yes I know, I'm BAD but please give us all your thoughts.

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I never said I didn't like it dave, I suggested it was being over-rated and then

inquired why you (and others) gave it such high merits.

That addresses the heading of the thread precisely.

Which of your 'load' of merit factors created the interest in this tune/piece/work/opus etc. RS
 ps- was it 1- dynamic range, 2- timbre, or was it something else behind 'door # 3' of Ray's list?
Dave Dexter said:

What other gauge would you like? You just don't accept it because you don't like it. If we were discussing a piece you liked, or something more obviously accomplished in terms of polyphony or counterpoint or harmony, you would be no more able to explain why you liked it than I am with LL.

Let's not spit out that tired argument of "I don't like it so there cannot possibly be merit beyond social-economic factors that encouraged people to buy it".

Ray,

4. Phrasing. Show that you can group musical thoughts together. Don't just have notes plod along.

5. Tempo. Speaking of plodding along, change it up. All the Baroque style music we post seems to be one volume and tempo.

With few exceptions we don't really know how Baroque music was played. We live in an age of all kinds of raw emotions. Why not use them.

Roger,

Pay attention. I brought up Louie Louie because it has none of the production values we are talking about in this thread. By all standards, that recording should have vanished long ago. Yet it survives. If you believe you have the answer, good for you.

Evasive as ever, you were scathing in the extreme so assuming your dislike was not a leap of the imagination.

I could tell you why I think it's good, but it'd be meaningless. Like trying to explain why my mum's cherry crumble was so good; beyond "I like the texture and flavour" it can't be explained.

roger stancill said:

I never said I didn't like it dave, I suggested it was being over-rated and then

inquired why you (and others) gave it such high merits.

That addresses the heading of the thread precisely.

Which of your 'load' of merit factors created the interest in this tune/piece/work/opus etc. RS
 ps- was it 1- dynamic range, 2- timbre, or was it something else behind 'door # 3' of Ray's list?
Dave Dexter said:

What other gauge would you like? You just don't accept it because you don't like it. If we were discussing a piece you liked, or something more obviously accomplished in terms of polyphony or counterpoint or harmony, you would be no more able to explain why you liked it than I am with LL.

Let's not spit out that tired argument of "I don't like it so there cannot possibly be merit beyond social-economic factors that encouraged people to buy it".
Bob, you've used the "plod" word. About here, that's worse than swearing :)
And tempo, yes that goes with accent. it should never be constant.

Sorry, Ray, I don't know what came over me.

Wow dave, and thanks for the 'oxygen'. You say you can tell us why you think its good.

... but you can't and don't. You now liken it to the vague aroma of a pie. How critically scientific.

I would say that I didn't 'over like' Louie Louie. I did not dislike it.

You said that it had a crapload of merit and then compare it to a pastry.

So I gather that your shitload of merit is based on nothing concrete.

Is that the totality of your support for your claim?

If you would list it's merits, then we could possibly discuss further the interest generated by

this particular tune and develop a better understanding with respect to  Ray's original query.

But then, you can't and you won't, because it has no concrete merit equal to it's so called

popularity.Why do you continually opt for inanely belittling, as opposed to a concrete discussion

and possible debate of the facts. When confronted , you dodge.    

this is music, if you want to demand concrete I suggest a different forum



roger stancill said:

Wow dave, and thanks for the 'oxygen'. You say you can tell us why you think its good.

... but you can't and don't. You now liken it to the vague aroma of a pie. How critically scientific.

I would say that I didn't 'over like' Louie Louie. I did not dislike it.

You said that it had a crapload of merit and then compare it to a pastry.

So I gather that your shitload of merit is based on nothing concrete.

Is that the totality of your support for your claim?

If you would list it's merits, then we could possibly discuss further the interest generated by

this particular tune and develop a better understanding with respect to  Ray's original query.

But then, you can't and you won't, because it has no concrete merit equal to it's so called

popularity.Why do you continually opt for inanely belittling, as opposed to a concrete discussion

and possible debate of the facts. When confronted , you dodge.    

Ray,
Can you explain why your first premiss that 'as wide a variation in dynamic range as possible' is critical to the production of music in any genre? We can all think of brilliant examples of music that do anything but range in dynamic from ppp to fff. I do of course agree that variation in dynamics is one area where music can be made more interesting to the listener but disagree that such extremes are a necessity. Perhaps this is what you are trying to intimate but have resorted to a touch of hyperbole to create a reaction?
Stephen,
My discussion header not only had a question mark numbered in the list but was then followed by a call for others to give their opinion so please, enlighten me and others with brilliant examples. I'm extremely interested.

P.S. I missed this out.

4. Know a little bit about the instrument you're writing for. especially guitar. :)

Enjoy the heat.

Yes, I know, I'm BAD, it's the Scottish climate.
Ray,

The question mark didn't escape me but I'm still unsure why you think extremes of dynamics are essential......!

I know next to nothing about fretted instruments having never studied them, which is why, in attempting to meet someone's request to compose something for classical guitar, I have sought advice on this forum and, incidentally, received some excellent help from Socrates. I'm sure you have already realised what an intelligent, pleasant and helpful fellow he is. Having undertaken a little bit of research into Flamenco I must say I am amazed at how strictly formulaic it is....I need another 12 months' of study even to understand the basics but have always enjoyed a challenge.

One of my regular golfing partners over here is a Glaswegian accountant.....he's really BAD I can tell you...and can't blame the weather.

Yes, dynamics. And lots of them. Of course they have to fit what you are writing. And what instrument you are writing for.

Think IN-A-GADDA-DA-VIDA. Lots of dynamics, even in an old rock song. Though we can't say much more because Roger doesn't know what a hook is.

4. Know a lot about the instrument you are writing for. Even then, it's tough.

You can't just plop notes on a page and expect the player to make it work. The music needs to fit the instrument. 

Axiomatic twaddle.

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