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On another thread, I mentioned Cymatics and the effects( and affects ) frequencies

may have on various things, and people.

I'm interested in getting some feedback and your thoughts regarding this subject.

All this is in reference to casually researching a theory, and nothing is yet 'carved

in stone' as they say. So please don't shoot the messenger.

If interested, watch this 25 min. video and let me know where you agree or

disagree with the information presented in it.  Thanks,   RS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpbHU4ImdaQ

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chuckle X 10    good 1 Mr. A.   I've heard that it was very addictive    good for you for breaking free.

unfortunately, I'm still in limbo  :>}}

Disappointed?  not at all   It appears to be a well crafted piece of furniture.

Due to the spinal legs tho', I'd say it belongs to the pterodactychord family

rather than the Triceratopsichord  genus.

In my mid twenties I designed and built a full sized oak pool table with leather

drop pockets. I still have it, somewhere under all the boxes of 'stuff' now piled

on top of it. : >}

ps- trending towards extinction is a process quite different from a moment of

obliteration, and some species of the dinosaur era still survive today.

As for the fugue, few can wrestle that gator and win. IMO (of course)     RS
 
Kristofer Emerig said:

You'll no doubt be profoundly disappointed with me, but I've a keen eye on this piece of obsolescence right now:

I see a lock below the keyboard but no fall board, but then unlike the piano I see that the fall board is attached to the lid.  Very clever.  Is this the customary construction of the harpsichord?  It looks like cherry wood, but the sound board must be spruce.  The keys are never covered with ivory or plastic.  I wonder why.  The inscription on the name plate appears to be in Latin, Greek or some forgotten tongue.  This is truly a gem from the dark ages.

Educated scholars and insightful musicologists... please advise.

What does the natural formation of the nautilus and this opus have in common?

I could stare at this natural work of art in amazement, as if it were a 'stairway to heaven'

and yet listen to the music as if 'once was enough'.

Is there a pattern  to the music I am missing due to my lack of appreciation of the harpsichord? 

Or, do I just not get the joke. Either way, give me a hint and I'll figure it out from there.

ps Lawrence, I think you are right about the cherry, and it appears to be the apartment size

version, or the spinet of harpsichords. I'm guessing replica circa 2015.
 
Kristofer Emerig said:

By no means White South African Woman, Maya Solisicci bows the broken chords of Pythagoras' rigorous realm.

K-man, I had never heard of Maya.   My ah  best guess therefore is 'endless chamber' music.

Then again, there is always that curious element of 'novelty'...

something that tweaks the ear and sometimes leads to a fad, but

is usually short lived.

The reverse argument might be,' why isn't the fugue more predominant

than it is today, in the popular music arena'- since it is 'what it is'?

The simple answer as I see it, so far, is that 'intellectual music' is not a form that

the average listener is looking for.

Though it has form, and takes a higher level of skill to compose, it appeals to a

limited audience. It's form does not form a formidable forum of followers in the

ever present appetite of phonic piranha. Music has, for a long time, become a consumer commodity. 

Therefore, the fugue is not the 'Art of the Day' in music, and, therefore the harpsichord has lost it's

questionable prowess. Still, the bones of the dinosaurs can be visited in museums everywhere,

as a reminder of what once was.  

My main question is, will  Cymatics  open a new window of understanding to a life and purpose for

music, and are frequencies able to shape culture.

I think that there is evidence that says they do, and will.  RS


 
roger stancill said:

K-man, I had never heard of Maya.   My ah  best guess therefore is 'endless chamber' music.

Dear harpsichordologist, and purveyor of harpsichordism (Kristofer)

     I enjoy harpsichord music but may never purchase the instrument, nevertheless it intrigues me. There are no pedals so I assume there is no need for a damping mechanism.    There doesn't appear to be any cast iron plate to hold the pin block.  It would seem that humidity would cause the wood to expand and contract necessitating frequent tuning.  How often do you need to tune it.  And how do you tune a harpsichord?  Tuning a piano you listen for beats, which would be difficult to hear with only short intervals of sound.  If I remember correctly the harpsichord I played at college had strings running parallel to the keys.  This one has strings running almost perpendicular.  Is there a right way?  Finally is it true that the virginal harpsichord is no longer manufactured because there are no virgins left to play it?

KE, it seems the threads have, as sometimes happens here, become entwined.

This thread is not about the fugue or the harpsichord. I believe it was you that reintroduced them.

Granted, they are both aspects of subsets;  Form and Conveyance- in music;  yet even music is a

subset of frequency. Each have their own unique timeline/lifeline within a wider, broader view and concept.

There really is no positive or negative factor involved here, other than personal preferences, though present day

preferences is an aspect of the 'art of the day' with regards to current trends.

Art can both reflect and solidify human experiences; and the artist can entertain, capture or even pioneer

the evolving reality(s) of our ever expanding and transcending consciousness.

That's about as honed as I have it so far. It's a work in progress/process     ergo.... R & D       


 
Kristofer Emerig said:

I'm having some difficulty with the notion that the fugue and the harpsichord are covalently obsolete, even if I were to accept that either were indeed obsolete. I don't find credibility in the reciprocal correlation implied when you state,

".. the fugue is not the 'Art of the Day' in music, and, therefore the harpsichord has lost it's questionable prowess."

Certainly, other varieties of music can be, and have been, played on the harpsichord besides fugues. Conversely, fugues can be, and have been, played on a variety of instruments besides the harpsichord; in fact, many have been written which can not be performed on the harpsichord.

I'd have you switch directions momentarily, and take an affirmative posture. Instead of asserting the irrelevance of the fugue in the modern day, perhaps you can point to a few musical forms which do have relevance today. That might clarify your position for some like myself who are completely dumbfounded with what your driving thesis is in this.



roger stancill said:

Then again, there is always that curious element of 'novelty'...

something that tweaks the ear and sometimes leads to a fad, but

is usually short lived.

The reverse argument might be,' why isn't the fugue more predominant

than it is today, in the popular music arena'- since it is 'what it is'?

The simple answer as I see it, so far, is that 'intellectual music' is not a form that

the average listener is looking for.

Though it has form, and takes a higher level of skill to compose, it appeals to a

limited audience. It's form does not form a formidable forum of followers in the

ever present appetite of phonic piranha. Music has, for a long time, become a consumer commodity. 

Therefore, the fugue is not the 'Art of the Day' in music, and, therefore the harpsichord has lost it's

questionable prowess. Still, the bones of the dinosaurs can be visited in museums everywhere,

as a reminder of what once was.  

My main question is, will  Cymatics  open a new window of understanding to a life and purpose for

music, and are frequencies able to shape culture.

I think that there is evidence that says they do, and will.  RS


 
roger stancill said:

K-man, I had never heard of Maya.   My ah  best guess therefore is 'endless chamber' music.

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