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This is sort of a continuation from a different thread.

I have purchased this piano and I'm very happy with it. This is the latest technology in digital piano making. Would be interested to hear different perspectives about what people think about this instrument and whether they believe that instruments such as these do justice to music and music making in general. My personal impressions so far are very positive. One thing is for certain that technology will never be able to accurately create what an acoustic instrument can do, but the truth is that many music colleges are taking up these Yamaha instruments to their schools and are incorporating them in their every day teaching, composition, and performance series and projects.

Here's a short video that showcases the piano I purchased, I personally love this instrument very much. Besides its amazing capabilities and dynamics it's also so beautiful and refined. Retail is $8,995.00

Best Wishes,

Saul Dzorelashvili

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Saul I guess I really have nothing against either route. I just lean more now toward the acoustic instruments. The piano I play at church is a Schimmel. It's valued at somewhere around 30K. I could never afford to buy one of these myself and it's an honor to be able to play it every week. I haven't ever been able to duplicate that experience on a sampled instrument. I'm talking about both the playing and the sound experience. 

When it comes to recording for the web, I would say much of what we hear online is either sampled or computer modeled. I own a bunch of the better sampled pianos and have played the modeled Pianoteq piano which in my opinion is probably one of the more realistic pianos. To give you some idea, I have all of the pianos included with Native Instruments Komplete and a half dozen other ones. These are large sample libraries that need a fairly robust computer and additional hard drives to run on. Kontakt streams the loaded samples in real time from hard disk. The piano you have likely uses a similar technology to get the sounds which are very realistic. 

The reason I bring all of this up is because when it comes to recording these kinds of pianos work better in most situations than many acoustic pianos. Why? Because in order to record an acoustic piano you need a good piano, good mics and mic placement all done in a great recording space. This can be a tall order unless you own a studio with a piano room in it. It would be difficult for me to get the same results on the Schimmel at church even though it is a wonderful instrument. So I can use my 88 key controller at home and pull up dozens of different pianos. In one of my programs called Addictive Keys I can even move emulated mics around an emulated room to get the feel and sound I'm after.

So I guess my point here is, sometimes it's more about the tools and the application than the bare facts about a thing. If I had the choice I would choose acoustic piano every time. For recording purposes I don't really have that choice. There isn't enough room in my house for a grand piano. Once again, for recording purposes nothing comes close to the results we can get from emulated pianos.

And you know what they say, the greatest form of flattery is to be emulated. To emulate well is the best use of the effort.

Timothy,

A Schimmel is a great piano.  I would compare it to a Steinway or Bosendorfer, but you have to add $30,000 to the price just to pay for the name Steinway or Bosendorfer.  To my tastes an acoustic Yamaha is more difficult to play, and a little too bright/shrill.  The audience probably can't hear the difference in pianos, but the pianist knows the difference.

@ Lawrence,

Thanks for that info.

 My experiences with real acoustic pianos are limited at best. Steinway always comes to mind as one of the very best though I can't say I've ever played one. I work at West Chester University. Aside from Penn State we are the largest state school in the PA. system and have a nice music school here. Penn State isn't technically a state funded school or so I'm told. That school must have several dozen Steinway pianos. I see one every time I go to the music building practice room for my violin lessons and have never sat down and played one. Go figure. I guess I should.

The Schimmel at church is a huge. Not a mini grand. The sound is amazing on it. It has increased in value since the church bought it. I'm not exactly sure what it's worth now. I am a heavy handed player on it and it still holds tuning well. It seems larger than the Steinways.

Here's a link to the WCU Steinway school if it interests anyone.

WCU Steinway School

I oversee campus temperature controls which makes me indirectly responsible for the health of these pianos. A couple of times we had  close calls with equipment failure. The pianos need a certain humidity range or bad things can happen. Not to mention the cellos and violins that also can't get into temperature or humidity extremes.

My experience with humidity is high humidity doesn't do much damage other than causing the piano to go sharp.  It's low humidity, especially in winter when heat is on that sound boards and bridges crack.  Some of the best European pianos don't do well in America because they can't take the humidity extremes.  Although pianos in low humidity places like Arizona can do okay if the wood is thoroughly dried and remains dry.  Extreme changes in humidity cause more problems than high or low humidity which remains constant.

Another point.  The wood used in finer pianos is aged for years before it is used.  In cheaper pianos, one day the wood is a tree, the next day it's a piano.

Timothy, Thank you for your input and comments here. I think that that is somewhat the same thing I was saying pretty much.

When you do recording besides playing you need a package deal. The Piano I purchased is a Package deal and more.

The sound is absolutely beautiful, the samples are very high quality and the recording capabilities are wonderful as well.

No its not the same as an acoustic piano but it does a wonderful job giving the composer the right tools necessary to be creative, all in a fine and very beautiful instrument, the flagship instrument by Yamaha. I really like this piano.

Regards,

Saul



Timothy Smith said:

Saul I guess I really have nothing against either route. I just lean more now toward the acoustic instruments. The piano I play at church is a Schimmel. It's valued at somewhere around 30K. I could never afford to buy one of these myself and it's an honor to be able to play it every week. I haven't ever been able to duplicate that experience on a sampled instrument. I'm talking about both the playing and the sound experience. 

When it comes to recording for the web, I would say much of what we hear online is either sampled or computer modeled. I own a bunch of the better sampled pianos and have played the modeled Pianoteq piano which in my opinion is probably one of the more realistic pianos. To give you some idea, I have all of the pianos included with Native Instruments Komplete and a half dozen other ones. These are large sample libraries that need a fairly robust computer and additional hard drives to run on. Kontakt streams the loaded samples in real time from hard disk. The piano you have likely uses a similar technology to get the sounds which are very realistic. 

The reason I bring all of this up is because when it comes to recording these kinds of pianos work better in most situations than many acoustic pianos. Why? Because in order to record an acoustic piano you need a good piano, good mics and mic placement all done in a great recording space. This can be a tall order unless you own a studio with a piano room in it. It would be difficult for me to get the same results on the Schimmel at church even though it is a wonderful instrument. So I can use my 88 key controller at home and pull up dozens of different pianos. In one of my programs called Addictive Keys I can even move emulated mics around an emulated room to get the feel and sound I'm after.

So I guess my point here is, sometimes it's more about the tools and the application than the bare facts about a thing. If I had the choice I would choose acoustic piano every time. For recording purposes I don't really have that choice. There isn't enough room in my house for a grand piano. Once again, for recording purposes nothing comes close to the results we can get from emulated pianos.

And you know what they say, the greatest form of flattery is to be emulated. To emulate well is the best use of the effort.

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