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The dream of Lygdamis

for Alto Flute, B♭ Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Percussion

A piece I composed some time ago but haven't posted here before.

Lygdamis was the ruler of the Greek island of Naxos in the 6th century bce. (History books sometimes
call him a “tyrant,” but in his time the Greek word “tyrannos” did not necessarily have the harsh connotation of our word “tyrant;” it meant something more like “strongman.”) He ordered the building of a temple of Apollo which was never finished, but its solitary gateway stills stands on Naxos today. This composition tries to suggest a kaleidoscope of visions of the island through time.

Performance note: one percussionist is required, to play Tambourine, Chimes, Triangle, Xylophone, and Cymbal.

The audio file was generated with software as a demo.
Audio file and pdf score attached; audio file also at SoundCloud The Dream of Lydamis.
The attached audio file and the one on SoundCloud have been enhanced with SoundCloud's Dolby mastering.
Score display and audio (non-enhanced) at MuseScore The Dream of Lygdamis.
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This score is Copyright 2019 by Jon Corelis. For performance or recording permission, please seemy permissions page.

Images:
Above: Temple of Apollo at Naxos. Early 19th century illustration from Edward Daniel Clarke, Travels in various countries of Europe Asia and Africa. Colorized by Jon Corelis.

Below: 20th century Greek folk embroidery from Naxos, detail. Photo by Jon Corelis.

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It is very nice, with hints of middle eastern influence...

Thanks, glad you liked it.  And there is a deliberate middle eastern sound, but I didn't want to make it too much so, since I imagine it as also reflecting other atmospheres.


Saul Gefen said:

It is very nice, with hints of middle eastern influence...

 Jon,

 I believe this fits very well into the ancient music category since the composition could be played by musicians of that era using their instruments which might be comparable to those you chose to use with possibly some slight variation in sound. Percussive melodic instruments comparable to the xylophone were most certainly available then. 

Thanks for the comment. I hadn't thought about special instruments, but I'll keep the idea in mind.

Timothy Smith said:

 Jon,

 I believe this fits very well into the ancient music category since the composition could be played by musicians of that era using their instruments which might be comparable to those you chose to use with possibly some slight variation in sound. Percussive melodic instruments comparable to the xylophone were most certainly available then. 

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