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This is the second movement of my Ocean Symphony, its title is the Mesopelagic Zone. 

A little bit about this zone:

At a depth between 200 – 1000 meters, the Mesopelagic Zone, also known as the twilight zone, is the next towards the bottom.  Many marine life in this zone vertically migrate towards the surface diurnall. Additionally, carbon will sink to this zone and will be consumed by many of the non-migratory creatures. What also striking about this zone is the lack of current creatures experience in this zone. The water does move in this zone, significantly slower than in the epipelagic zone. Most water currents are driven by the thermohaline system and/or the upwelling of denser waters from lower zones and the fall of less dense water from the surface. Very little sunlight reaches this zone, thus many creatures adapt to either camouflage themselves within their mostly dark surroundings, or evolved eyes that can see prey within the mostly faint blue light. Because of its lack of sunlight, this is also, where bioluminescent creatures begin to appear.

How I try to personify it in the music:

In this movement, tertian chords and non-tertian passages represent the duality of light and dark; tertian harmonies representing the slight amount of light that can be seen at the upper parts of the mesopelagic zone, and non-tertian harmonies representing the absents of light in the lower parts of the zone. Because the water in this zone is mostly static, the music represents this by keeping the harmonies static and repetitive. Aside from the introduction and the coda, 14 chords are used almost as a tone row, which is repeated three times. The harmonies are presented in a homophonic texture with very little movement. 

The main feature of this zone that is highlighted the most in this movement is the vertical migration of marine life—and to a lesser extent the fall of carbon to this zone. The melodic lines mostly ascend upward using rhythmic motion that is imitative of jellyfish and other zooplankton that make the migratory journey up to the surface. The rhythmic motion is much slower to imitate the slow movements creatures in this zone make, as they do move slower to conserve energy. Towards the end of the movement, the whale motive comes back from the first movement, as representative of whales that frequent this zone to feed. 

Let me know what you think and if you notice any notational errors. 

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Measure 100 is a dangerous pause. Expect premature applause. LOL.
Again, you are quite the impressionist. I like all of this.

Awaiting movement 3.

-Rich Hill

Glad you liked it. Yeah I have debated about that measured Grand Pause, but I do want a very long and almost deceptive pause there. The risk is there but hopefully the fact that the conductors arms are not down, and that its only the second movement will prevent audiences from clapping. 

Richard T. Hill said:

Measure 100 is a dangerous pause. Expect premature applause. LOL.
Again, you are quite the impressionist. I like all of this.

Awaiting movement 3.

-Rich Hill

Very interesting movement.  I'm not sure why, but somehow parts of this remind me of Holst (I'm starting to wonder if I'm conflating everything in this style with Holst, because I'm too ignorant of this style of music to be able to tell the finer distinctions between them).  I found that there are a lot of sudden pauses in this movement -- not sure if this is an artifact of the midi, or if it's intentional. I wasn't quite sure how to interpret that.  The imagery is also not as clear -- the chords in the beginning, for example, I didn't know how to interpret until I read your description. Nevertheless, overall it was a pleasant listen, and there are many interesting sound colors here, as well as many interesting "personalities" (I assume these depict various lifeforms down in those depths).  It didn't sound like this was near the bottom of the ocean; it sounded rather bright and quite active, perhaps something closer to the surface, but still deeper than the previous movement.

Also looking forward to hearing what the 3rd movement will be like.

Interesting start... Nice. Good build-up. 

It's quite different then the first movement, it sounds more melancholic for the first few minutes, then it changes nicely. . Nice and slow, I like how you alter the instuments.. I like it. Quite a puzzling end, though...?

I was thinking the same thing about Holst!  The resemblance seems very much there.  In the 4th mvt too.  Cool piece tyler. 

H. S. Teoh said:

Very interesting movement.  I'm not sure why, but somehow parts of this remind me of Holst (I'm starting to wonder if I'm conflating everything in this style with Holst, because I'm too ignorant of this style of music to be able to tell the finer distinctions between them).  I found that there are a lot of sudden pauses in this movement -- not sure if this is an artifact of the midi, or if it's intentional. I wasn't quite sure how to interpret that.  The imagery is also not as clear -- the chords in the beginning, for example, I didn't know how to interpret until I read your description. Nevertheless, overall it was a pleasant listen, and there are many interesting sound colors here, as well as many interesting "personalities" (I assume these depict various lifeforms down in those depths).  It didn't sound like this was near the bottom of the ocean; it sounded rather bright and quite active, perhaps something closer to the surface, but still deeper than the previous movement.

Also looking forward to hearing what the 3rd movement will be like.

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