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Symphony In C 

Thank you to all who assisted me with string writing for Albion 1

Regards,

Saul










Second Movement - Andante


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Thank you Tim!

Timothy Smith said:

Hi Saul,

The difference between the first string movements in your last thread and this one are like night and day. This sounds very realistic and true to a real string section. Not only this but you have made a very delightful composition with a very light hearted feel. Congratulations on such progress in such a short time!

The volume and dynamics of the second movement in the very first post is a little less dynamic and lacks the overall volume of the second. Still , it's all good.

Listened to your 2nd mvmt twice. Great ambience with the pizzicatos, but personally I felt this movement was somewhat bare. The theme is a bit too generic and I didn't find it very engaging. Thematic development was also minimal, which didn't help to catch my attention. I feel like I'm missing something here, that's why I listened to it twice, in case I missed something obvious.  This sounds more like a transitory bridge than a movement that can stand on its own IMO; but I'll reserve judgment until you post the next movement. Perhaps there is something there that will make all this worthwhile after all.

Perhaps my expectations are a bit too high. :-P  Or maybe I'm just not the right audience for this symphony.

But in case you happen to be seeking for ways to improve this movement: the first thing I'd suggest is to look for ways of making the theme a bit more unique. Maybe add some embellishments, or throw in some varieties of rhythm. Or start out with the theme as-is, but really go all-out on the thematic development. (There are masterpieces which start out with a seemingly-bare subject but turn it into something awe-inspiring at the end.) Don't settle for just the usual routine treatment; get really creative with the development, toss things up, and add a lot of variety. Make it really worth your listeners' while.

Second thing I'd suggest to look at, is to go over the instrumentation again, and carefully consider where you could add a bit more color. The orchestra is a powerful instrument with a lot of expressive power; try to think of ways of bringing out your themes even more. Ways of marking out the structural elements of the movement. Maybe add some extra accompaniment or doublings at important junctures. Don't settle for a Generic Non-descript Slow Movement; make it a little sub-masterpiece in itself, a little gem that people will remember long afterwards.

Remember the advice that slow movements are very hard to write. Because of their relaxed tempo, holding your audience's attention is especially challenging, so you should be using every available tool at your disposal to make this happen.

Just my $0.02.

Thank you for your input.

Regards

H. S. Teoh said:

Listened to your 2nd mvmt twice. Great ambience with the pizzicatos, but personally I felt this movement was somewhat bare. The theme is a bit too generic and I didn't find it very engaging. Thematic development was also minimal, which didn't help to catch my attention. I feel like I'm missing something here, that's why I listened to it twice, in case I missed something obvious.  This sounds more like a transitory bridge than a movement that can stand on its own IMO; but I'll reserve judgment until you post the next movement. Perhaps there is something there that will make all this worthwhile after all.

Perhaps my expectations are a bit too high. :-P  Or maybe I'm just not the right audience for this symphony.

But in case you happen to be seeking for ways to improve this movement: the first thing I'd suggest is to look for ways of making the theme a bit more unique. Maybe add some embellishments, or throw in some varieties of rhythm. Or start out with the theme as-is, but really go all-out on the thematic development. (There are masterpieces which start out with a seemingly-bare subject but turn it into something awe-inspiring at the end.) Don't settle for just the usual routine treatment; get really creative with the development, toss things up, and add a lot of variety. Make it really worth your listeners' while.

Second thing I'd suggest to look at, is to go over the instrumentation again, and carefully consider where you could add a bit more color. The orchestra is a powerful instrument with a lot of expressive power; try to think of ways of bringing out your themes even more. Ways of marking out the structural elements of the movement. Maybe add some extra accompaniment or doublings at important junctures. Don't settle for a Generic Non-descript Slow Movement; make it a little sub-masterpiece in itself, a little gem that people will remember long afterwards.

Remember the advice that slow movements are very hard to write. Because of their relaxed tempo, holding your audience's attention is especially challenging, so you should be using every available tool at your disposal to make this happen.

Just my $0.02.

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