Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

     Several composers have written in the cowboy/western style.  Among them are,  John William’s music for the movie  “The Cowboys,”  Ennio Marricone, who scored for many Italian and American westerns, and Elmer Burnstein”s “The Magnificent Seven,” and my favorite, Marlboro cigarette commercials.  But the father of the orchestral cowboy/ western music has to be Aaron Copland.  It is a genre that conveys American ruggedness, independence, and freedom.     

      The first rule to writing western music is, there are no rules.  Key signatures are suggestions and change willy-nilly.  A scale may ascend seven notes, descend nine notes and put you in a different key, so go with it.  Tri-chords are passé as fourths are the preferred sound.    Syncopation is the hallmark of western music but eventually up beats become down beats so everything just flows together.  Of course there are the obligatory farm animal sounds, a crack of the whip, the clippity clop of horse hooves or   even a few gun shots.     

     Here is my version of the cowboy genre.  All comments are welcome.

     Lawrence

Views: 143

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Although I try to keep my replies as positive as possible, I have to agree with Raymond. This sounds like a random medley of farm animals and so I hear only noise and no music. Then again, I have never truly appreciated the nuances of this particular style you are trying to imitate. I'm sure those who are more accustomed to this style will provide you with something more meaningful.

As I said before, all music post 1750 is poison to my ears. 

     I'm trying to write a four part symphony, but can't think of a scherzo section.  How can you write a humorous movement in a symphony that is already quirky as you say?  Actually this is the first half of the first movement, and the main theme eventually predominates toward the end.  Thanks for listening.

Lawrence

Ray,

     Well get out there and feed the chickens and slop the hogs.  That'll quite 'em down.

Lawrence
 
Raymond Kemp said:

Sorry Lawrence, but I can't hear the music above the farm animals.

Viv,

     I understand why you would get that impression.  The main theme doesn't appear until around meas. 140.  Then it is repeated 4 or 5 times in different forms along with the lesser themes.  I probably spent too much time on the intro.  Thanks for the input.
 
Vivaldi said:

Although I try to keep my replies as positive as possible, I have to agree with Raymond. This sounds like a random medley of farm animals and so I hear only noise and no music. Then again, I have never truly appreciated the nuances of this particular style you are trying to imitate. I'm sure those who are more accustomed to this style will provide you with something more meaningful.

As I said before, all music post 1750 is poison to my ears. 



Alex Dunn said:

Hi Lawrence,

About your third movement scherzo dilemma, how about turning the idea of the third movement being reserved for humour on its head and treat your third movement as a really beautiful slow movement. You could put all of your deeper affection for the western/cowboy genre into this movement before returning to the quirky feel for a finale? 

    

Alex,

 I've already written the slow movement and the quirky fast movement.  It comes to about 20 minutes total which is short for a symphony.  I might be out of ideas, but somehow I'll come up with another movement.

Lawrence

     I've

Alex :)

Bob,

     If Telemann had had that attitude his music would probably have been a little long in Gregorian chant.

Lawrence
 
Bob Porter said:

Vivaldi,

What do you suppose Telemann would do if he were suddenly dropped into our time? Would he deny 250 years of musical development? Out of the scope of this thread, I know.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service