Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

Hello all - contestants were asked to submit a work of no more than about 90 seconds duration to this contest. There were no other limits. 19 members of the Composers' Forum submitted entries! Now we ask all members of the forum to vote on which ones you think are the three best. Although there are a lot of entries, it will only take you about 25 minutes to listen to them all, so please listen and vote! The last day to vote is Monday March 18 at midnight EST. After voting has completed, I will announce the winners on this thread and identify the composers. This thread will then be open for discussion if there is interest.

Here is the link to the survey where you can vote: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/YQW3G2H

GO!

Attached also is a worksheet created by Janet Spangenberg, which has the names of the compositions, the comments by each composer, and room to comment as you listen to each piece.

 

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One thing I found interesting about the voting: Arandjelovic Milan (Composer Q - Ode to Leaking Faucet) won 2nd place overall, and also won the special category "Best Title" with a very high number of votes (10). Is it possible that the two wins are related - in other words - does the title of a piece affect how people perceive it?

Most propably. I personally wouldn't have given much thought to it without this particullar title.

Gav Brown said:

One thing I found interesting about the voting: Arandjelovic Milan (Composer Q - Ode to Leaking Faucet) won 2nd place overall, and also won the special category "Best Title" with a very high number of votes (10). Is it possible that the two wins are related - in other words - does the title of a piece affect how people perceive it?

There's no doubt that title is a big draw.  One of the best competitions for the kids, Pike's Peak, gives just about as many points for title as they do for harmony or notation! 

Is there a lesson here? Should you not name your piece "Untitled #457"?

Definitively not. I tried to describe exact thing, so, my title is really related to music. My piece was my try to quickly compose something funny, both music and title. So i was in bed trying to sleep, counting that i will compose easier with clear head later, and, then i heard water...

In my college composition group class, we were told of a contemporary piece a composer wrote which he entered in several competitions. It went completely ignored. Then he gave it a new name, entered in yet another competition and it was considered utterly profound, putting this composer "on the map". The piece was Penderecki's "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima".

The title "Ode to Leaky Faucet" created an expectation of what was to come, and the music didn't disappoint. To see the title, and then listen and think, "Yeah, it's just like that!" shows skill. There were several entries whose titles were well reflected in the music, IMO. However, this title is one that many of have actually experienced, making it even more meaningful to those of us who have suffered through this mundane event. Well done, Milan!

A localised version will soon be available in your region.



Raymond Kemp said:

Except, it didn't work in Britain where we would call it a leaking tap. ;-)

Janet, thanks a lot to your comment, this is my first composition on this forum, and i like too see that my piece is so interesting to people here. :) 

Ray, as soon i can, i will make a program with regional and language settings for my pieces. :) I can contact Apple, maybe they want to make a program maybe called iTranslate. :)

It doesn't really matter whether or not it's "fair" to judge a piece of music by its title because the fact of the matter is that just IS one of the factors people judge by. I always agonize over titles to get just the right one.

It says: Mandarin ducks playing in the water. 

man is my chinese rusty  I thought it said 'mandolin sucks, play the sitar'

Janet, your example of the Threnody was so good.  That piece without its title is just plain frightening.  With its title, we know it's supposed to be a horror and we can, if we choose, go into that space with him.   We have some warning, at least, and if it's a day when we'd rather be goofy, we probably wouldn't even listen.  But the title is the piece, in that example. 

Bob, I totally understand your points.  For example, good ole Hans von Bülow gave all those sappy names to Chopin's Preludes which just seem to cheapen them.  I would MUCH prefer saying Prelude No. 4 in E minor over "Suffocation"!   What a terrible name and how unfitting.  I think the name really depends on the piece, and what you want to happen to your piece over time.  The problem with cute names is that they catch the public's attention at first, but may not stand the test of time.  So some of Satie's names keep folks from even taking him serious.   That's very probably what he intended, but still ...

I say, consider the piece, consider the purpose of writing it, consider the audience.  If you're trying to win a contest, it really helps to have a catchy name, particularly if there are a lot of pieces competing.  One international judge told me that he gets so many pieces for a given competition that he looks for reasons to disqualify some of them, just to end up with a small enough group for him to work with.  No, it's not fair, but it's what is, and the more we know how different environments work, the more we can gauge how (or if) we want to work within that environment. 

I do think, Ray, if you had used the 鸳鸯戏水 title, you would have even topped Spiros!   Unless, of course, he came back with ταξίμι.   Gav, maybe our next contest should just be names ... ???

Y'all are all so entertaining, I'm having a hard time getting my work done today!!!

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