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Hello,

I want to start composing my own Baroque music after Vivaldi. Unfortunately I don't know a lot of Music theory - especially chord progressions. I don't even know what A7 stands for in the key of C major. I need a book that focuses on Baroque counterpoint/harmony etc. Any suggestions? Not too simple - I have grade 5 music theory ABRSM but my knowledge stops there.

I like to fiddle around on Sibelius. Here's something quick I came up with - I feel so limited and frustrated that my ideas can't come to full fruition. I have an idea then it must be simplified because of my poor knowledge of chord progressions. I won't compose a piece simply by trial and error anymore.

I want to get the level of some of the early Vivaldi Concerti for Strings - La Stravaganza/Armonico etc is way beyond me. I believe if I have the basics in functional harmony then I can compose credible Vivaldi string concertos (his more 'simpler' works at least).

Here's a 5 minute fiddle around on Sibelius using my own ideas to give you an idea where I'm coming from. The piece begins in C major then I attempt to modulate but it all goes to pot! Hence my need for a good musical foundation to base my ideas on.

There are so many books on the market - some probably better than others. Suggestions please!

Many thanks.

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Walter Piston's Counterpoint.

Thank you all and in particular Kristopher for his analogous insight. I am now compelled to reciprocate your analogous insight first: Do not discern yourself with my efforts for I am a novice circumventing my exorbitant deficit in musical theory. That being said, I hear a plethora of fertile Baroque pastiche imprisoned within my mind. It's musical nuances receptive to the smallest of environmental stimuli. Should any key befit this Pedagogical lock then I trust it is to be found in the art of musical theory - as opposed to a schematic of many permutations
Before you buy Fix or anything Else, discard Vivaldi and listen tO Bach, his fugues especially - 2 hours or more a day för a Month or so... Then study a text about it.

Fux not Fix! Hehe,wrote the reply on my smartphone, it is not set on English as main language...

Thank you for your guidance. I shall analyse chord progressions of Vivaldi concerti although I require a treatise on functional harmony - the mechanics of which lie beyond immediate knowledge.  Do you know of a site where I can access (for free) some Vivaldi concerti for my analysis? I shall pay homage to  il Prete Rosso by leaving nothing but a vestige of extraneous design in my compositions.


Kristofer Emerig said:

Vivaldi, nice poetry, but allow me to assist you; If you wish to become a French chef, would you come here asking for a treatise on fundamental chemistry? After all, it's just chemistry - at one level.

I'm suggesting you'd benefit more from a cookbook than a period table. Counterpoint is far too focused and mechanical a field to answer the need you are expressing here, although it is not unrelated to the question.. I hope that clarifies it.


 
Vivaldi said:

Thank you all and in particular Kristopher for his analogous insight. I am now compelled to reciprocate your analogous insight first: Do not discern yourself with my efforts for I am a novice circumventing my exorbitant deficit in musical theory. That being said, I hear a plethora of fertile Baroque pastiche imprisoned within my mind. It's musical nuances receptive to the smallest of environmental stimuli. Should any key befit this Pedagogical lock then I trust it is to be found in the art of musical theory - as opposed to a schematic of many permutations

Discarding Vivaldi would be akin to meticulously placing cyanide particles inside my ear - the technicalities and ramifications of which I have no particular interest in - or any other malevolent vagary for that matter.

As for Bach, him and I do not share a musical relationship for reasons I shall not expound here. Although I admire his audacious productivity - rather like myself in that sense, no? 


Per-Erik Rosqvist said:

Before you buy Fix or anything Else, discard Vivaldi and listen tO Bach, his fugues especially - 2 hours or more a day för a Month or so... Then study a text about it.

I have found a pedagogical relic for your eyes to discern:

http://anima-veneziana.narod.ru/Talbot/T5_Musical_style.pdf

It is a ripe offering that will propel my understanding to no end.

My vpoint was that listening to Bach instead of V., is beneficial for learning polyphony - the baroque style. (Bach was a genius when it comes to counterpoint). Listening to fugues by B. makes you able to become accustomed to the way of thinking before studying a text on the matter. Nothing wrong with Vivaldi, he composed good music too. 

Bach perfected and combined his predecessors (among them Vivaldi) way of composing, into something greater and more elaborate. The High Baroque ends in 1750 when Bach died. When Vivaldi died, there were still Purcells, Händels, and a multitude of other baroque composers, but they didn't (technically and aesthetically come close to B.'s work)

Not my opinion only.. I would suggest you begin by reading wikipedia on the history and development of the baroque period.

But feel free to study Vivaldi instead, I'm just pointing out a shortcut for you to understand counterpoint. Mozart (during classicism after Bach's death) was more intrigued by Bach's works than any other composer.

I am all too familiar with Bach than your discourse dictates. Although I anticipate a change of musical motion towards functional harmony as opposed to the anachronistic counterpoint of Bach. For Bach, for Luther, for the protestants in general the root to the divine was limited to scripture; there were no sacraments. The majority of ryom-Verzeichnis was composed for an entirely different purpose.



Per-Erik Rosqvist said:

My vpoint was that listening to Bach instead of V., is beneficiary (he was a genius when it comes to counterpoint). Listening to fugues by B. is that you would learn they way of thinking before studying a text. Nothing wrong with Vivaldi, though. 

Bach liked Vivaldi, but perfected and combined his predecessors (among them Vivaldi) way of composing, into something greater and more elaborate. The High Baroque ends in 1750 when Bach died, for a reason.

But feel free to study Vivaldi instead, I'm just pointing out a shortcut for you to understand counterpoint. Mozart (during classicism after Bach's death) was more intrigued by Bach's works than any other composer.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/terence.dwyer/Tutorials.htm

A fairly good primer on theory and part writing (4 voice).

I am not the pernicious puppeteer you suspect. Cleanse yourself of such vagaries for you walk the path of sacrilege.

Raymond Kemp said:

Why do you good people allow this person to dangle you all on a string?

Alright I hear you..........it's just a bit of fun.

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