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Hi All,

String bowing is an essential part of the compositional process as is all phrasing and articulation, because it  reveals your true musical intentions. .You don't have to be precise about string bowing as players will sort out any issues, but being able to bow competently enough to show the players what you want the music to do is only to the benefit of your work.

Bowing (competently, if not expertly!) can be learnt by study and observation and with that in mind, those of you who want to develop an instinct for it might want to look at the link below. All of the bow strokes for violin, cello and bass are clearly explained and demonstrated by a professor.

Who knows, you might just watch a bow stroke and think..that's what I need for some bars in my latest piece.........

http://hidersine.com/education/technique-videos

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Thanks for sharing, Mike.

Have you seen Andrew Norman's website, Shaken Not Stuttered?  It covers in detail many of the extended string techniques from his major works (Companion Guide to Rome, Play, etc.).  

Lots of interesting videos here, though not for the faint of heart...

http://www.shakennotstuttered.com/teresa

http://www.shakennotstuttered.com/play-techniques/

Hi John,

Yes I've seen those and actually thought about posting them too, but decided not to. I love the Companion Guide to Rome, Norman is a wonderful composer. Any new music fans who don't know it should check it out as it is a compendium of modern string technique in a terrific expression.

Another 2 good educational links.....

Companion Guide to Rome, Norman is a wonderful composer. Any new music fans who don't know it should check it out as it is a compendium of modern string technique in a terrific expression.

I couldnt agree more:)

Thanks Bob https://soundcloud.com/bob-morabito

Great stuff, thanks Mike, DM and Bob for posting everything here, very interesting and useful.

I found the following exchange between Andrew Norman and a student in the comment section for a YouTube video of another of Mr. Norman's works. I thought Mr. Norman's response was interesting, especially the ". . . half the time this music enrages me too, and I wrote it."

Andrew Norman Hello Mr. Norman, I listened to this in class, and the others were entertained by its unique nature, yet I was enraged. Is there something that I am missing that would make it palatable for me, or is this merely one for the novelty of chaos?
Andrew Norman
Hi Randy Wells. Thanks for reaching out! a few thoughts: 1) I am (as weird as this may sound) super glad you were enraged by this music. To me this means that you had a strong reaction to the sounds, and in my view a strong reaction from somebody (in any direction) is way better than a neutral or non-existent one, so thank you! 2) "Palatability" is not an artistic aim of my work. If you find this music unpalatable, that's totally fine by me; no music/art/work is for everyone's palate. 3) I don't think you are "missing" anything. If this piece enrages you (and, btw, half the time this music enrages me, too, and I wrote it), figure out why and then channel that into making your own work as fiercely and passionately and honestly as you can! All my sincere best to you.

nice one Ingo.

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