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Hello everybody

This is the second time I'm posting some work of mine. I've already had many rich exchanges on this forum, both about your and my music, so I'm looking forward to read any of your thoughts on this work.

It is a one-movement piano and flute sonata, with which I aimed at shyly stepping into quartal and quintal harmony, which have always fascinated me.

One movement, but not exactly: despite being played all in a row without interruptions, you will notice a certain structural division throughout the piece. I composed it this spring and revised it in the last months.

I'm embedding here the video with the score.

As always, feedback and thoughts of any sort are more than welcome.

Have a nice day

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Some very imaginative writing for piano, at times reminiscent of Keith Emerson (Emerson, Lake and Palmer, of which only Palmer remains). Other times I thought I heard some Debussy, especially his writing for the piano in his Violin Sonata (one of my favorite chamber works). The flute writing was OK, but could stand to be a bit more showy or flamboyant. Perhaps too many long notes, with the piano doing the rapid figures (which although interesting tended to be a bit overdone). Then again, after listening, what echoes in my mind is exactly those long flute notes, so I guess they were effective after all. 

This is music in which rhythm dominates. The flute does provide a nice contrast to the often frenetic piano. All in all there is good balance between them. I suppose I could have wished for more melodic content and development. I like music to say something. Not that this doesn't; it's just of the more abstract variety, which is fine. Music doesn't have to say something; it can just be interesting sounds. As such the piece succeeds, and a live performance would be quite dynamic. I hope you get one. It would be very interesting.

On a production note, I thought you could use a bit more reverb. You have to be careful with reverb on the piano, esp. considering the pedals, but I thought a tad more would give it some depth. 

Hei Michael

Thank you for commenting, I see your thoughts are always valuable and precise.

In order: thanks for the ELP mention. 70s progressive music has always been an inspiration for me (especially Genesis, as one might guess from this sonata's ending echoing Firth of Fifth [did not even do it on purpose, just had friends telling  me]).

Thank you for noticing the contrast between the flute's long notes and the piano's frenetic patterns, it was indeed one of the aims. And yes, there is not so much melodic development; I employed more micro-tunes and motifs rather than whole melodies - no particular reason, it's just my current feeling and taste as a composer :))

Regarding production: yes. I composed the piece at the piano playing continuously with at least some pedal, but I still have to figure out how to spread it properly on my software, as so far I can only manage to write it either-or-not (central part, for instance, has pedal all the time, never lifting), which in the faster parts would create horrible dissonances. I'll figure it out, sooner or later.

Thank you again for commenting. I posted yesterday my first symphony, it's in the main discussion page. I would be very glad if you could share some thoughts on it, any time you want.

michael diemer said:

Some very imaginative writing for piano, at times reminiscent of Keith Emerson (Emerson, Lake and Palmer, of which only Palmer remains). Other times I thought I heard some Debussy, especially his writing for the piano in his Violin Sonata (one of my favorite chamber works). The flute writing was OK, but could stand to be a bit more showy or flamboyant. Perhaps too many long notes, with the piano doing the rapid figures (which although interesting tended to be a bit overdone). Then again, after listening, what echoes in my mind is exactly those long flute notes, so I guess they were effective after all. 

This is music in which rhythm dominates. The flute does provide a nice contrast to the often frenetic piano. All in all there is good balance between them. I suppose I could have wished for more melodic content and development. I like music to say something. Not that this doesn't; it's just of the more abstract variety, which is fine. Music doesn't have to say something; it can just be interesting sounds. As such the piece succeeds, and a live performance would be quite dynamic. I hope you get one. It would be very interesting.

On a production note, I thought you could use a bit more reverb. You have to be careful with reverb on the piano, esp. considering the pedals, but I thought a tad more would give it some depth. 

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