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Hi all,

Here is an sonata I have composed for a friend who is a local organist. It is his intention to play it at one of our churches on the Isle of Man.

The structure and style of the work is characteristic of early sonata form seen around 1760-1770 mark, especially the third movement in a 3/8 time which was common during that time. From the 1770s, symphonic form in particular adopted a 4 movement structure, usually with the addition of a minuet as the 3rd and a 2/4 presto as the 4th.

If anyone would like to learn more about music from this period and what techniques/methodology is involved, feel free to PM me and it would be my pleasure to provide some guidance

This is more or less finished, although there are a couple areas that need expanding/correcting though is only minor at this stage.

Thanks,

Markus .

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And 3rd movement

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Mozart on the organ! Fun!

Did Mozart write anything for the organ?

Also: is it a conscious decision not to use pedals?

Yes. It is really a keyboard sonata. Johann Christian Bach wrote some organ sonatas (without pedals) for four hands and I would say that this work contains more influences from him than Mozart.

I am less inclined however to attribute my influences to a specific composer, but instead my experience with consistent patterns and motifs that characterize music composed during the galant era. This encompasses both baroque and classical idioms, and often results in idiosyncrasies.

If you would like to refer to that JC Bach Sonata for organ, please follow below link

 https://youtu.be/UkAaY-ASfCs

Victor Eijkhout said:

Mozart on the organ! Fun!

Did Mozart write anything for the organ?

Also: is it a conscious decision not to use pedals?

Thanks for the link. That was cool.

What makes me say "Mozart" is things like measure 7, beat 3: that D#-E is very Mozartian, and I don't hear it in that JC Bach piece.

Markus Boyd said:

Johann Christian Bach wrote some organ sonatas (without pedals) for four hands and I would say that this work contains more influences from him than Mozart.

Ah yes, thanks for pointing that out. I don’t have a specific definition of this motif and I agree that Mozart did use this, although I don’t believe he was the first. 

Speaking in terms of galant schema, I would say that it is either type of converging cadence or Indugio. They were often  utilized as a means to modulate toward a different key, albeit temporarily, without losing the melodic flow. . I have used an indugio. After the second subject   To the key of A major.

The below link. Is a paper written by Professor John Rice who is an authority on galant schema. Ion page 16 is an example of an indugio / converging cadence by Haydn shown in the illustration. I must admit I’m not entirely sure of the distinction between converging cadences and indugios... however they do sound closely related in my opinion

http://www.lettere.uniroma2.it/sites/default/files/allegati/The_Hea....  

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