Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

--

Rough sketch for possible development, a few musical ideas for a piano solo, Serpentine 2.

https://hearthis.at/stephen.c.doonan/serpentine-2-wip/

Views: 81

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Interesting listen here. Lots of things going on in it. Seems to be modal variations on a diad 5th?

I'm not at an instrument to tell for sure. Doesn't evoke emotion for me, seems to kick in the higher thought processes, like I'm trying to guess where this is going from a technical perspective. Serpentine is a good title for it since if I think about a snake the music matches that thought perfectly.

Thanks for sharing!

The primary musical idea in this rough fragment is the use of triads of 4ths. Two-note chords (dyads) or sequential intervals of a 5th, as you suggested might be the case, would accomplish the same effect, which is to omit 3rds which would resolve the music into an either major or minor tonality, and that omission makes the music less resolved and more open-ended with regard to possibilities for harmony and melody.

Timothy Smith said:

Interesting listen here. Lots of things going on in it. Seems to be modal variations on a diad 5th?

I really like the energy and momentum of this piece, I'm assuming you played it into your plug in?  Pianoteq sounds good and appears to be reasonably priced with some interesting features.

So were you going to expand on this as a solo piece or introduce other instruments?  I could hear an intro, maybe some other movements with different tempos and textures

Good work!

That’s a very strong piece. Sounds extemporaneous, not labored or forced in any way. Harmonically sparse but with just a touch of jazz influenced modulation which maintains interest. The development also has a natural feel... like this is well known territory to the composer/performer.

Thank you, Mark, for your comments.

The first iteration of the primary left-hand figure of this musical idea is composed of the sequential notes C G C F Bb Eb G C F Bb F Eb Bb G D Bb, which could be considered (analytically) in various ways, including a simple C-minor 7, 9 or 11; but the first six notes of it are the pentatonic scale based on the dominant 7th of C, Bb; in addition, the 4th, 5th and 6th notes (a triad of 4ths played as a sequence rather than a chord), as well as the 7th, 8th and 9th notes (another sequential triad of 4ths), could be considered, for the sake of harmony or melody, to be temporary modulations into a key represented by any of the notes of the triad, either major or minor, or neither. However, rather than "analyze it to death," I prefer to use the musical figure as a touchstone for more intuitive, spontaneous thought, since any number of different types of harmonic or melodic ideas can be associated with the simple 16-note figure.

It can be useful to analyze something after the fact, to see why it functions (or sounds) the way it does, but I personally generally prefer to be merely creative until I ask myself the "why" question in order to apply or incorporate what I might learn from analysis to subsequent more-spontaneous musical ideas. I'm guessing many composers have this approach.

I like the creative freedom and challenge of the hard-to-pin-down, non-resolved nature of this particular musical figure. It will require a lot of development and organization before I'm happy with any particular final result, but it really spurs my creative thought along any number of different tangents.

That's an awfully wordy response about such a rough sketch of a musical idea, so I apologize for that. :)



Mark Ames said:

That’s a very strong piece. Sounds extemporaneous, not labored or forced in any way. Harmonically sparse but with just a touch of jazz influenced modulation which maintains interest. The development also has a natural feel... like this is well known territory to the composer/performer.

I like this a great deal and hope you find an opportunity to expand on it further. I can hear scope for a small orchestral accompaniment as a short concerto style of piece, lots of interplay with percussion and piano, etc. Good work.

Your harmonic approach is similar to Hindemith, tonal and diatonic but not locked into a key. I have explored this both in written pieces and in improvisation. 

Once i I get a better handle on posting and uploading (very new here!) I’ll share an example or two.

Mark Ames

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service