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This is my first post. I have completed my 2nd String Quartet last night. To be honest, I wrote the II (central) movement in 2017, and left it standing there.

In the last days, I re-elaborated it, and wrote a 1st and 3rd movement to it, and here it is linked.

Any feedback is appreciated.

Thank you in advance

Recorded with Sibelius Ultimate | Sibelius 7 Sounds

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Slow and soft all through, very steady and uniform. I guess you want to build an atmosphere here, a sort of mood. And it is certainly very relaxing putting me in a dream mood now and then. Although I like music with action, variation and contrasts, this one appeals to me in its uniqueness. It sounds more folkish than classical but that is not negative, just a particular genre.

Your introduction surprises me ' I have completed my 2nd String Quartet last night'. I guess that is ok for a very experienced composer, which you might be, your music is good, but for myself, I usually listen to my tune 100 times before I publish. Still, of course, it doesn't get much better. So next time I will try your way.

Thank you for playing this nice tune for me. I enjoyed it.

Kjell

Hi, I listened your String Quartet from the beginning to the end.

First, what I perceived.

The first and third movements are shorter, third movement is longer than the first.

You have used perceptible entities (musical ideas).

These ideas are shorter and various in the first movement and they get

longer as the piece proceeds.

The second movement brings in repetitions and this increases the effect

of meditation through.  Also folk tune like material comes in (if I may name it as such).

The third movement reduces the meditation effect with the beauty of 

musical ideas.

What I noticed:  I could not hear dynamic effects, changes in loudness

 etc. which might break the homogeneity  of the work and hurt

the meditation effect but still a little bit could have not hurt.

Thank you for giving me the chance to ponder on your work.

You made me think twice.

Good work.

 

Hi and thank you both for your attention and feedback, I appreciate it very much.

1) In reply to Kjell:

I'm glad you liked the slowly building structure of the work, it was indeed my aim throughout the composition. Although I'm also enthusiastic about action and contrast in string quartets (my favourite ones perhaps being Shostakovich's 8th, Dvorak's 12th, Debussy and Ravel's only one, Pavel Haas' 2nd and Schulhoff's 1st), when writing them myself I feel more inclined to develop a more introspective and meditative character, with long breaths that allow the single instruments to dig into the main themes. I also appreciate your noticing the folk-ish feature of it.

For what concerns concluding a quartet overnight and publishing it the day after, I see what you mean. I must say that I wrote the core of this work in 2017, so much of its development had been growing for a long time. To be fair, in recent days I added almost nothing to its themes, while I focused more on expanding its thematic development. Otherwise, your revising an own work 100 times is usually my way too.

2) In reply to Ali Riza:

Yes, the first and third movement are shorter than the central one (the first way shorter). I chose in fact to first introduce the themes in a short introduction (the first movement), and later show and develop once again the main one in a last, meditative movement.

Thank you for appreciating the musical ideas in the third movement, and also for underlying the overall dynamic consistency of the work. Lastly, thank you for the suggestion regarding the same dynamic effects, I'll make sure to pay more attention to it in later works.

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Thank you both once again for the feedback. I would be very glad to listen to some of your works, if available.

Just a few technical notes. Sibelius solo violin has no vibrato as well as some other tone problems. So I suggest not using it in a quartet situation. Unfortunately, the only other choice is to use solo viola for the top three voices. obviously, viola doesn't sound like a violin, but not as grating as the solo violin. Don't forget to pan the instruments and add some reverb to help cover abrupt ends of notes.

Thank you for the feedback Bob. I was considering to buy Noteperformer3 for Sibelius. Do you think it will help solving this inaccuracy?

Bob Porter said:

Just a few technical notes. Sibelius solo violin has no vibrato as well as some other tone problems. So I suggest not using it in a quartet situation. Unfortunately, the only other choice is to use solo viola for the top three voices. obviously, viola doesn't sound like a violin, but not as grating as the solo violin. Don't forget to pan the instruments and add some reverb to help cover abrupt ends of notes.

It depends on your goal. If all you need is to get the notes down so you can hand parts to real players, you've got that. Many people like NotePerformer, so it might be a good investment. Personally I don't care for it. But that's just me. 

For some reason it reminds me of Rutland Boughton's String Quartet on Greek folk themes (an incredible work; if you've never heard it I strongly recommend it). I do hear some Debussy here, primarily in the slower, more chordal passages. A lot of good ideas here. It's not just a bunch of loops like so much one hears these days ( a consequence of sequencers and DAWS I suspect). Some nice metric/rhythmic variation. Not sure I like the ending all that much. It sounds like dissonance for dissonance's sake; doesn't really fit the mood of the rest of the piece. Same for the scordatura effect near the end. It just seems kind of stuck in there for no good reason. Other than that I enjoyed the piece very much.

Hi Michael, thank you for the feedback.

Concerning the Debussy feeling, thank you: French string quartets are usually my reference for the genre (adding Ravel and Milhaud to the list), and more generally all the string quartets in between the late 19th century and the early 20th (Janacek, P. Haas, Schulhoff, V. Williams, etc.).

Also, thank you for the part concerning the many ideas, I see what you mean with the "loops" in contemporary music. I also appreciate minimalism, but one can easily get tired of it.

About the ending: you're right. Actually, it was not supposed to be completely dissonant, as the initial transition with the glissando should have transposed up the major chord by a quarter-tone, making it dissonant only during the transition. Unfortunately, my software could not "quarter tone" all the strings for unknown reasons, and the viola remained 12-tonal :)) therefore the dissonance. I decided to keep it anyway as a reminder to myself that I should be exploring the chromatic possibilities of microtonality in future - but I fully understand if not appreciated.

Thank you again for the feedback!



michael diemer said:

For some reason it reminds me of Rutland Boughton's String Quartet on Greek folk themes (an incredible work; if you've never heard it I strongly recommend it). I do hear some Debussy here, primarily in the slower, more chordal passages. A lot of good ideas here. It's not just a bunch of loops like so much one hears these days ( a consequence of sequencers and DAWS I suspect). Some nice metric/rhythmic variation. Not sure I like the ending all that much. It sounds like dissonance for dissonance's sake; doesn't really fit the mood of the rest of the piece. Same for the scordatura effect near the end. It just seems kind of stuck in there for no good reason. Other than that I enjoyed the piece very much.

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