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Hello, everyone! I look forward to joining in on some musical discussions as most of my peers aren't all that into sitting for hours deciding between a "dotted eighth and a sixteenth" and a "quarter note, eighth note" triplet.

My question is what would be the best way to notate this measure? The first version is how I had it because that's how I envisioned the notes coming in. I was given advice to change it to multiple lines/voices, which made the overall score look much better, but this one measure seems off to me. Is it okay to have the rests floating way up in the middle of nowhere like that? Is it better to have them lined up evenly, or should they be as low as possible above the notes they hover over?

Thanks for your help!

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Thanks for the insight, Bob. The problem I have composing for piano is that I learned piano on my own after learning guitar, so I think and play it more like a guitar (more chord/fills focused); I mostly try to write out how I hear or play it--or would play it, were I talented enough to play all my compositions--which is why I sought feedback on how competent sight readers would interpret it. 

Bob Porter said:

The third version is more to the point than the others. I really depends on what instrument you  are writing for. The first version is not for piano. The second might be a piano reduction, besides being hard to read.

Know your target instrument. I'm not sure there is any such thing as perfect notation. The player is the final arbiter. 

Matt,

If you read piano music I would suggest looking at a lot of it to see how others have notated things. If you play by ear, I guess you have to go with you gut. But in general simpler is better. As long as number three gives you the effect you want, go for it. 

Thanks for the comments, Bob. "The player is the final arbiter" is a good insight, and I'll be keeping that in mind when searching for the balance between these minuscule note details and ease of reading for the player. 

Bob Porter said:

The third version is more to the point than the others. I really depends on what instrument you  are writing for. The first version is not for piano. The second might be a piano reduction, besides being hard to read.

Know your target instrument. I'm not sure there is any such thing as perfect notation. The player is the final arbiter. 

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