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Hi,
Piece for Computer and 4 Tromboni is composed of a tape part generated when I attended Stanford-CCRMA 1991 summer seminar. and 4 tromboni parts were composed afterwards for my graduation from Illinois State University in 1992.  Recently I performed and mixed Tromboni parts with MuseSCORE and Audacity.

The work's subtitle is 'Death on the Border' and has 7 parts:
1-Prologue
2-Moment
3-Yearning
4-Ritual
5-Oblation
6-Lamentation
7-Epilogue
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuO6OHjj83Y

IMSLP ref:
https://imslp.org/wiki/Piece_for_Computer_and_4_Trombones_(Saral%2C...

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Hi, Ali,

I took a few moments to look at the introductory notes and briefly at the scores, only briefly because I don’t want to delve into the mystique or mechanics of the work – just listen.

I found it pretty engaging. Accomplished. Easy to listen to. Although it sounds nothing like Subotnick, the Prologue and Epilogue brought reminiscences of Touch, possibly because he reintroduced form into tape/computer music which seems a feature of this work, the use of metre and rhythm (as in part 2. Moment, part 3 ritual and on). And the blend of tonality with the computer.

I couldn’t quite reconcile the timing of the parts with those in your commentary. The Ritual seemed to start at 3’11”. The Lament at 7’44”. (No matter about that. I think I kept track of the parts.) The metre in the ritual was interesting, seemed to fall into a 3 beat pattern toward the close. In the Lament, the trombone came across as a military “last post” (mixed with various computer pitch manipulations).

Your use of silence in the Epilogue was excellent if I may say so. It leaves a bleak picture.

All in all a telling work that describes its title well, particularly the Yearning and the Lament followed by what came over as desolation in the Epilogue.

Very good listening, Ali. Thank you for presenting it.

Bests, Dane

 

Hi Dane,

I greatly appreciate your kind interest in my work. 

Yes, I agree with 'reminiscences of Touch', there are some similar sounds but Morton's organization is based on human manipulation only where as I used Stanford CCRMA researcher Heinrich Taube's LISP library to creat isorhythmic algorithms.  Mine is also human manipulated but at a higher level like pouring paints to draw paintings.

Starting time of movements:
1- 0sec Prologue
2- 37sec Moment
3- 1min 18sec Yearning
4- 3min 17sec Ritual
5- 5min 30sec Oblation
6-7min 32sec Lamentation
7- 9min 50sec Epilogue

"The Ritual seemed to start at 3’11”. The Lament at 7’44”. (No matter about that. " Such precision of your

listening is amazing.

The ritual has a 4/4 meter but the isorhythm-talea is 3/4 length and its manipulation.
I had forgotten about it. Thank you.

This piece uses the natural horror vacui tendency to arouse a sense of fear.
The last movement leaves a 'bleak sense' as you have mentioned.

It is impossible to describe how motivating your comments have been.

Thank you very much again.

Ali



Dane Aubrun said:

Hi, Ali,

I took a few moments to look at the introductory notes and briefly at the scores, only briefly because I don’t want to delve into the mystique or mechanics of the work – just listen.

I found it pretty engaging. Accomplished. Easy to listen to. Although it sounds nothing like Subotnick, the Prologue and Epilogue brought reminiscences of Touch, possibly because he reintroduced form into tape/computer music which seems a feature of this work, the use of metre and rhythm (as in part 2. Moment, part 3 ritual and on). And the blend of tonality with the computer.

I couldn’t quite reconcile the timing of the parts with those in your commentary. The Ritual seemed to start at 3’11”. The Lament at 7’44”. (No matter about that. I think I kept track of the parts.) The metre in the ritual was interesting, seemed to fall into a 3 beat pattern toward the close. In the Lament, the trombone came across as a military “last post” (mixed with various computer pitch manipulations).

Your use of silence in the Epilogue was excellent if I may say so. It leaves a bleak picture.

All in all a telling work that describes its title well, particularly the Yearning and the Lament followed by what came over as desolation in the Epilogue.

Very good listening, Ali. Thank you for presenting it.

Bests, Dane

 

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