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Just completed a new composition for Wind Orchestra - It's a mirage, Igor

 

(Instrumentation: 1 Picc, 2 Fl, 2 Ob. 1 CA, 1 Cl (Eb), 2 Cl (Bb), 1 Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoon, 1 Contrabassoon, 4 Horn, 3 Trumpet, 3 Trombone, 1 Tuba, Timpani, Percussion)

   

MP3 created using Sibelius (and the Sibelius Essentials samples)

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A great piece of work David, and very listenable for a notation app rendered recording.

Glad you like it. 

I should point out that external to Sibelius I added reverb and compression, and the copy of the score that is used to create the MP3 had a lot of manual humanizing done to it to add in all those subtleties that a conductor/orchestra would do instinctively but a software program would find very difficult.

 

 

Is there a score? 

Score attached.

 

(Score is also available at http://www.scoreexchange.com/scores/122689.html )

Attachments:

The Sibelius Eseentials sound great!  So does the music!

Ok, obvious, you know what you are doing.  I'll do two replies.  This one will be about typesetting which you clearly have chops. Take them with a  grain of salt.

1) Warum habet du in English and Italian geschrieben?  Notice how I switched languages?  That what's you did when you listed "Cor Anglais."  If you are listing them in English you have to use English Horn.  Language must be consistent.

2) When you go to 3/4, notate if the Dotted-Quarter note becomes the Quarter, or if the eighth note beat is consistent.  That is very important.  So what if they have a recording.  Put it on the score.  This will be good for the players also.

3) On the first page of the actually music, make sure you add the part numbers i.e. Flute 1, Flute 2.

4)  You have a floating piano bracket on your marimba part. 

5) It's no need to say "tenor" for trombone.  We already know it's tenor. That was used because the alto trombone was in practice in the 18th and 19th century.  It's cumbersome to use it now (tenor).

6) Proper abbreviation for trumpet is "trpt". 

7) Your score order is incorrect.  Although some place the Horns before the trumpet (standard practice in orchestra), it is more common to switch the two in band.  Second, the percussion are last. Percussion only come before strings. 

8) Tuba doesn't need to be abbreviated.  You used "Timp" so you can use four letters for "Tuba.

9) "lontano" should be italics.  Actually, all dynamic markings are in italics.  

10)  Your piece has 480 measures.  Just a suggestion, it might be more advantageous to use measure numbers as rehearsal markings than letters.  I know it would laborious to switch but that's just a suggestion.

Hope this helps!

Musically Yours,

Chad "Sir Wick" Hughes

Take them with a  grain of salt.

Noted

 

1) Warum habet du in English and Italian geschrieben?  Notice how I switched languages?  That what's you did when you listed "Cor Anglais."  If you are listing them in English you have to use English Horn.  Language must be consistent.

'Cor Anglais' is actually French (corno inglese in Italian), but I get your point. However, I've seen scores by publishers which use English for all the instruments except for Cor Anglais (where they use 'Cor Anglais').

 

2) When you go to 3/4, notate if the Dotted-Quarter note becomes the Quarter, or if the eighth note beat is consistent.  That is very important.  So what if they have a recording.  Put it on the score.  This will be good for the players also.

Fair point. I think, off the top of my head, it is eighth note equals eighth note throughout, but indicating it in the score would certainly take away any possible confusion.

 

3) On the first page of the actually music, make sure you add the part numbers i.e. Flute 1, Flute 2.  

Fair point

 

4)  You have a floating piano bracket on your marimba part.  

This was caused when I created the PDF for this site. (I should have picked it up). It does not exist in the score that is available on ScoreExchange

 

5) It's no need to say "tenor" for trombone.  We already know it's tenor. That was used because the alto trombone was in practice in the 18th and 19th century.  It's cumbersome to use it now (tenor).

Perhaps, but it is only 'cumbersome' for me to write it in the score, not for a conductor reading it, or a player playing the part.  ;-)

 

6) Proper abbreviation for trumpet is "trpt".  

I would argue that in English the abbreviation is 'tpt.' (tromp. if French is used, tr. if German, and so on)

 

7) Your score order is incorrect.  Although some place the Horns before the trumpet (standard practice in orchestra), it is more common to switch the two in band.  Second, the percussion are last. Percussion only come before strings.  

True, for band scores, but this is in the (layout) vein of Stravinsky's Symphonies of Wind Instruments, which uses the orchestral layout re: horns. Fair point on the percussion. It should probably be located at the bottom of the score.

 

8) Tuba doesn't need to be abbreviated.  You used "Timp" so you can use four letters for "Tuba.

I've seen scores where Tuba is and isn't abbreviated.

 

9) "lontano" should be italics.  Actually, all dynamic markings are in italics.   

Yes, I may have missed italicizing some of those additional indications. (As far as I am aware all my actual dynamic markings are italicized in this score)

 

10)  Your piece has 480 measures.  Just a suggestion, it might be more advantageous to use measure numbers as rehearsal markings than letters.  I know it would laborious to switch but that's just a suggestion

There are 2 camps of thought on rehearsal numbers/letters, with pros and cons for both. I fall into the letter (and latter) camp.

Per

Have you made more pieces for wind orchestras and is it supposed to be a part of something bigger?

How did you get the soundcloud player in your top post?

These are the steps I follow (some of which you probably already know):-

(1) In Soundcloud select the relevant track and click on Share

(2) Click on Edit your widget and choose the Flash tab *

(3) Switch off Show track comments (optional)

(4) Copy the code from the Copy and paste the widget code to your website section

(5) Paste the code into your topic  while in HTML mode

(6) Return to Visual Mode to complete any other text you want in your topic (or you can do it in HTML mode if you are comfortable with HTML)

Your soundcloud track should then appear OK in the topic

 

(* It may also work using the soundcloud HTML5 option, but I haven't tried that yet, so cannot confirm)

Per

My previous reply appeared to lose a line...

 

Have you made more pieces for wind orchestras and is it supposed to be a part of something bigger?

No this is the first piece I have written for wind orchestra. It is meant to be a stand-alone piece
 


 

1) Warum habet du in English and Italian geschrieben?  Notice how I switched languages?  That what's you did when you listed "Cor Anglais."  If you are listing them in English you have to use English Horn.  Language must be consistent.

'Cor Anglais' is actually French (corno inglese in Italian), but I get your point. However, I've seen scores by publishers which use English for all the instruments except for Cor Anglais (where they use 'Cor Anglais').

 

Man, I must have been tired, you are correct. It is french....very french :)

6) Proper abbreviation for trumpet is "trpt".

I would argue that in English the abbreviation is 'tpt.' (tromp. if French is used, tr. if German, and so on)

You know, I've seen a lot of people use "tpt" lately which goes against my teaching.  It's minute.

8) Tuba doesn't need to be abbreviated.  You used "Timp" so you can use four letters for "Tuba.

I've seen scores where Tuba is and isn't abbreviated. 

True.  I was thinking more along a publishing standpoint and making a consistency with scores. 

10)  Your piece has 480 measures.  Just a suggestion, it might be more advantageous to use measure numbers as rehearsal markings than letters.  I know it would laborious to switch but that's just a suggestion

There are 2 camps of thought on rehearsal numbers/letters, with pros and cons for both. I fall into the letter (and latter) camp.

Very true. point taken.

2nd Reply on the composition.

As I said earlier, you obviously know what you are doing and it is clear you have a respect for penmanship and melodic development.  This is a very strong piece.  It isn't much I can say about the composition itself because it works and it works well.  There are a few orchestration things that you might consider.

meas 194.  You have the Bass Trombone going lower than the tuba. Did you want that?  It's pretty low on bass trombone.  Will it have the sonority you want that low?

meas 197: Would you consider putting the sixteenth notes on beat 4 in the second bassoon in the contra? Is say this to so the downbeats may lock better when the 1st bassoon enters?  You did what I mentioned in measures 212-213.

Meas. 235-237:  The beaming in the flute and clarinet goes against the grain.  I think this is situation where seeing beat 3 is best.

Meas. 261 and perhaps throughout:  Once again, this maybe from a school of thought.  I usually try to avoid what I call hanging sixteenth rests.  Could you get the same effect by writing two sixteenth and an eighth?  I tend to get quicker results on the latter.  Once again, school of thought.

Conclusion: Great piece.  Put it in some competitions.

I think this is absolutely superb.   Right from the beginning I am impressed.  The opening is very beautiful.  It's one of those openings that you remember.  It lingers in the mind.   (I have only listened to the piece four or five times, and it comes to me at certain times of the day --- you know how a truly good piece of music penetrates the subconscious and resurfaces now and again).   The opening works so well, because the material is orchestrated in such a way as to create what one feels is a single instrument.     Everything blends together without any smearing of sound textures.  

The sparse orchestration during minutes 2- 3 provides an excellent breathing space to lead up the more energetic passage which follows.  

Looking at the whole, we can say the form is perfectly suited to the content and the content to the form.   A wind orchestra is exactly what is suited to play the material.    Nice textures at around 4:48.  I am not sure how they are produced.  I find the work in its entirety achieves a pleasing balance between the more serious emotions (which are never too weighty in this piece) and a sort of "sane whimsy"-- the best phrase I can think of to describe the humorous passages. 

The pacing is always varied in a proportioned way:   sufficient slow time for contemplative moods, which are politely shunted aside for allegro and allegretto excursions.    Sparing use of percussion, (such as the xylophone), varied rhythms, and good distance between the lines keep the piece always interesting, while it remains uncluttered.   (Exemplified very well in time index from minute 9 to minute 10).    In minute 11, the scales and fluttering by the flute and trumpet are very well done.

As good as the opening statement of the theme is, the theme in that form is only alluded to, and recapitulated in a subtle way.    The work exercises restraint.

There is much more that could be said in favor of this piece.   It has its own unique flavor, and while we could compare it to the work of other extremely famous composers (favorably), there is no need to.

I like the dissonances, from about 12:30 to 13:00.  The decelerando leading to the solo clarinet is a nice touch, in the last minute, along with the sparing use of trombone glissandi, that is well done.

I think I had some minor suggestions, but I forgot them.  If I remember, I'll let you know.  

Just listened to the end, again.

That very quiet and calm passage, starting with a solo flute, from about 11:15 to around 11:38, is strikingly serene, and provides a perfect preface for the dissonant passage that follows.

For those who have only heard the piece once, I say, listen to it again, several times.

The orchestration, rhythmic variation, and alteration of textures are such that repeated listenings are necessary for a full appreciation.

 A really strong piece of work! It never gets dull and it´s coherent. My congratulations.

Johan

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