Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

Hey guys, I thought that since I haven't really posted any music(YET!), I'd make some kind of contribution. So, I'm going to try to help some people out with orchestration.

Take this example: Orchestra: Violins, Violas, Celli, Flutes, Piccolos, Bassoons, and a Harpsichord. Not very exciting is it? Let's say the Violins, Flutes, and Bassoons were playing the melody(Team A), and the Violas and Piccolos were playing the accompaniment(Team B), and the Celli and Harpsichord were just playing arpeggios in the key the piece was in(Team C). Not very exciting, is it? Well, what if you added, say, Clarinets to Team A, Oboes to Team B, and Double Basses to Team C? Better? To make the orchestration better, you have to find instruments that are relatively quiet, yet loud enough for the audience to hear, and make the orchestra sound just as good, or better.

I don't know if I'm explaining this right, so if you need help with orchestration in one of your pieces, email me at hoodedpiainst@gmail.com, and I'll see what I can do.

Thanks for reading, good luck, and happy composing!

Views: 880

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

There's an example, you can see that the second example sounds a tad bit better than the first, with the larger orchestra.

If not, and you're still having trouble orchestrating one of your pieces, email me, and I'll try to help you out.

By the way, nice composition, Quinn.

Quinn Mason said:

Alright So,

What i've done is composed a short piece using Hoodedpianist's example above, just to see how it sounds.

Orchestration 1, is Violins, Violas, Cellos, Flutes, A Piccolo, Bassoons, and a Harpsichord. Violins, Flutes, and Bassoons are playing the melody, Violas and the Piccolo are playing the accompaniment, and the Cellos and Harpsichord are playing arpeggios.

Orchestration 2 is the same piece, but like the example above, I've added Clarinets, Oboes, and Double Basses and changed a few things.

Now you can decide which is better!

-Mason

I think I will pass.

Pass on what?

Kevin Riley said:

I think I will pass.

Thank you.

Hooded Pianist said:

There's an example, you can see that the second example sounds a tad bit better than the first, with the larger orchestra.

If not, and you're still having trouble orchestrating one of your pieces, email me, and I'll try to help you out.

By the way, nice composition, Quinn.

Quinn Mason said:

Alright So,

What i've done is composed a short piece using Hoodedpianist's example above, just to see how it sounds.

Orchestration 1, is Violins, Violas, Cellos, Flutes, A Piccolo, Bassoons, and a Harpsichord. Violins, Flutes, and Bassoons are playing the melody, Violas and the Piccolo are playing the accompaniment, and the Cellos and Harpsichord are playing arpeggios.

Orchestration 2 is the same piece, but like the example above, I've added Clarinets, Oboes, and Double Basses and changed a few things.

Now you can decide which is better!

-Mason

I wonder, we all have different orchestration techniques.

You give the melody to the violins, flutes and bassoon, where me personally would give the melody to the oboe or clarinet doubled by violins, or Quinn (let's say) gives the melody to the brass (As in the symphonic suite ;) ), or Kevin (let's say again) Gives the melody to the low instruments (bass, cello, bassoon). In short, we all have our own personal orchestration style, right? Or do we orchestrate by the book???

You can have your own style, knowledge of orchestration is about choosing the possbilities that actually work. Harp-like arpeggios in double basses don't work because they're unplayable. Putting them in a DAW and saying "but hey, it sounds good" doesn't change the fact that they're unplayable.

And yes, we do orchestrate "by the book", as in, we take into consideration all the characteristics of an instrument and how it affects its boundaries and effectiveness when using particular techniques. This can be learned from books, although not all of it... still, if your goal is "MIDI orchestration" (sigh), then fine, but in this case skill is needed for producing the audio rather than choosing effective combinations of instruments. I don't think that's what discussion starter had in mind, though, or did he?

Have you finished it yet?

Hooded Pianist said:

I'm writing the example starting now, give me about 1 hour.

HA

Kevin Riley said:

Have you finished it yet?

Hooded Pianist said:

I'm writing the example starting now, give me about 1 hour.

Do. Not. Rush. Me.

Have. Patience.

Also, I'm a bit busy, just use Quinn's example for now.

Kevin Riley said:

Have you finished it yet?

Hooded Pianist said:

I'm writing the example starting now, give me about 1 hour.

No rush, just you said yesterday........................

Shh, do you hear that? That's the sound of forgiveness.

Also, like I said, I'm pretty busy.

Kevin Riley said:

No rush, just you said yesterday........................

Can't agree more.

Greg Brus said:

You can have your own style, knowledge of orchestration is about choosing the possbilities that actually work. Harp-like arpeggios in double basses don't work because they're unplayable. Putting them in a DAW and saying "but hey, it sounds good" doesn't change the fact that they're unplayable.

And yes, we do orchestrate "by the book", as in, we take into consideration all the characteristics of an instrument and how it affects its boundaries and effectiveness when using particular techniques. This can be learned from books, although not all of it... still, if your goal is "MIDI orchestration" (sigh), then fine, but in this case skill is needed for producing the audio rather than choosing effective combinations of instruments. I don't think that's what discussion starter had in mind, though, or did he?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service