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Hello everybody

I've finally completed my first symphony. I began working on it in 2017 and have finished a few weeks ago.

It's in four movements and I've had it played by Sibelius|Ultimate and Noteperformer 3.

The first movement does not follow the traditional sonata form; rather, I've decided to build each movement as a web of recurring motifs.

Any feedback is welcome - if the work is too long, I could also appreciate feedback on single movements, in case you do not have time to listen to the whole thing at once.

Enjoy

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Hi Ragione,

I listened all 4 movements.  !st movement and the rest three in groups.

It is difficult to make comments on a work this size with only first

listening.  Would it be worth anything, I do not know.

I liked the contrast you created with the third and fourth movements.

The ending of the first movement was too much for me.

The second movement was truly meditative.

A work based on orchestral colors as the means of expression,

similar to Dvorak 1st symphony.  Even in the third movement

orchestral colors are more important than melodies.

I could not hear modulations to far tonalities and also

you increased loudness rather than use harsh dissonance.

This is all that I could perceive.  

Beautiful. Hard work.  Congratulations.

Ali R+

Any chance of breaking it down into separate movements. 53 minutes is a big ask along with time to to reprise sections (maybe necessary to comment on structure) then comment. That could go well over the hour. 

Thanks if you can.

Cheers :)

Hi Ali

Thank you for taking your time to listen to this. I understand your feeling about the 1st movement´s ending; I was in fact in doubt whether it could be a bit exaggerated. Glad the 3rd-4th movement contrast worked as planned, and yes, I did not use much dissonance :)) I wanted to have a rather consistent and let's even say "popular" work, in terms of harmony.

Thank you once again

Ali Riza SARAL said:

Hi Ragione,

I listened all 4 movements.  !st movement and the rest three in groups.

It is difficult to make comments on a work this size with only first

listening.  Would it be worth anything, I do not know.

I liked the contrast you created with the third and fourth movements.

The ending of the first movement was too much for me.

The second movement was truly meditative.

A work based on orchestral colors as the means of expression,

similar to Dvorak 1st symphony.  Even in the third movement

orchestral colors are more important than melodies.

I could not hear modulations to far tonalities and also

you increased loudness rather than use harsh dissonance.

This is all that I could perceive.  

Beautiful. Hard work.  Congratulations.

Ali R+

Hei Dane

Do you mean into separate videos? Because in fact the symphony is already split into movements (there's four of them, as written in the description), the longest being 16 minutes. I added timestamps in the YouTube video description, so you can go back to any movement at any time.

Dane Aubrun said:

Any chance of breaking it down into separate movements. 53 minutes is a big ask along with time to to reprise sections (maybe necessary to comment on structure) then comment. That could go well over the hour. 

Thanks if you can.

Cheers :)

Hi Valerio -

Welcome to the forum, I have not yet had time to listen to your work but I will.

Just for us the time stamps are:

2nd movement - 16:10

3rd movement - 28:13

4th movement - 40:54

My first request is for you to repost as 4 mp3 files so that I can listen when I'm out and about. It's a work that clearly requires multiple listening in order to fully appreciate the sheer scale of the piece.

My second request is for you to keep doing what you are doing with your music. I absolutely love this work. Whilst many will be commenting on structure, technical detail or recording process, sometimes it's great to just listen to a piece for enjoyment. And that's what you have given me. The following comments have absolutely no structure to them..

There are so many contrasting moments throughout, I particularly enjoyed the journey of the second movement. Your extensive use of piano reminds me of Martinu who used piano as a symphonic instrument to great effect.

You have justified your own approach competently. Some of the themes and colours could easily lead to dissonant passages, and would work well in their own right, but you have chosen the path of accessible harmony which will appeal to a wider audience.

My only criticism is the opening of the fourth movement which has more of a 'soundtrack' feel to it than the previous instalments. Whilst it stands up well on it's own, the contrast is just a little too much in early listenings. The movement does quickly go back to form and settles back into the thematic structure we experienced early on.

As a performer (I sing in some large choirs) the short choral input of the fourth movement would be very expensive for a live performance. You wouldn't get an amateur choir involved as there isn't enough to maintain their interest (people who sing for fun want to be singing). However, as much of the tone is double on other instruments, you could rescore for a live setting.

There's a lot more to add, but I have to get back to work. It's what they pay me for!!

Hi Graeme

Thank you so much for listening and commenting, I'm really glad this work is being appreciated. I will upload the mp3 files later.

It's a funny coincidence that you mentioned Martinu, since I first listened to him just two days ago. I'm glad the "accessible" enjoyable path has worked; there is indeed some form of structure, but it's clearly more phantasy-like than well-established. To name a few examples, my main symphonic models in this case would be Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique and Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade, rather than late classic/ early- and mid-romantic symphonic form.

I understand the last movement's main theme may sound rather cinematic - I wanted to explore some violent path. As you noticed though, the theme is later re-used and developed in a way that is closer to the symphony's general mood. Concerning the choir - you are totally right. I actually allowed myself to used it only because I know it's a software that had to play my symphony - if I'll ever be offered (rather unlikely, but not impossible) to perform it with real musicians, I would simply rescore it.

Thank you again for your feedback!

Have a nice weekend



Graeme Helliwell said:

My first request is for you to repost as 4 mp3 files so that I can listen when I'm out and about. It's a work that clearly requires multiple listening in order to fully appreciate the sheer scale of the piece.

My second request is for you to keep doing what you are doing with your music. I absolutely love this work. Whilst many will be commenting on structure, technical detail or recording process, sometimes it's great to just listen to a piece for enjoyment. And that's what you have given me. The following comments have absolutely no structure to them..

There are so many contrasting moments throughout, I particularly enjoyed the journey of the second movement. Your extensive use of piano reminds me of Martinu who used piano as a symphonic instrument to great effect.

You have justified your own approach competently. Some of the themes and colours could easily lead to dissonant passages, and would work well in their own right, but you have chosen the path of accessible harmony which will appeal to a wider audience.

My only criticism is the opening of the fourth movement which has more of a 'soundtrack' feel to it than the previous instalments. Whilst it stands up well on it's own, the contrast is just a little too much in early listenings. The movement does quickly go back to form and settles back into the thematic structure we experienced early on.

As a performer (I sing in some large choirs) the short choral input of the fourth movement would be very expensive for a live performance. You wouldn't get an amateur choir involved as there isn't enough to maintain their interest (people who sing for fun want to be singing). However, as much of the tone is double on other instruments, you could rescore for a live setting.

There's a lot more to add, but I have to get back to work. It's what they pay me for!!

Hello Valerio,

Well, I listened to the 1st and 2nd movements and there's little to say other than it's accomplished, the orchestration fine, the production excellent and most pleasant to listen to. I felt the 1st movement started to drag a bit around the 3 minute mark but thankfully moved on around 3'33". The second movement is luscious, expansive. The piano part had a hint of Balinese about it.

Very well done. If I'd taken a chance and bought this on a CD I'd almost certainly play it again though at 52 minutes I'd be lucky to find that much free time. I'll try to listen to movements 3 & 4.

Very impressive Valerio, your passion and commitment to the art form are obvious and your skills as well.  I only listened to the first movement due to time constraints but I look forward to hearing the complete work since I enjoyed the first movement very much. I liked especially your use of piano, letting it contribute on different levels without dominating as in concerto form. 

I noticed that you listed your interests as micro tonality and minimalism which we don't see here, perhaps those styles are used in the movements I have yet to listen to.   Good work!

Hei again Dane! Thank you so much for the feedback. I´m glad that the work´s intro managed to "move on" soon enough not to be boring.

Have a nice weekend

Dane Aubrun said:

Hello Valerio,

Well, I listened to the 1st and 2nd movements and there's little to say other than it's accomplished, the orchestration fine, the production excellent and most pleasant to listen to. I felt the 1st movement started to drag a bit around the 3 minute mark but thankfully moved on around 3'33". The second movement is luscious, expansive. The piano part had a hint of Balinese about it.

Very well done. If I'd taken a chance and bought this on a CD I'd almost certainly play it again though at 52 minutes I'd be lucky to find that much free time. I'll try to listen to movements 3 & 4.

Thank you for the feedback and all the kind words, Ingo.

Concerning my microtonal and minimalistic inspirations: that is true, there is no microtonality in this work. It simply would not have been consistent with its overall mood and structure. The second movement, instead, has a fair share of minimalism in it. I should say that, when I mentioned microtonality, I was thinking that I will soon have to approach it in my compositions :)) I'm still in a receptive phase, listening a lot to many different microtonal composers before trying my way into it.

Thank you again, have a nice weekend

Ingo Lee said:

Very impressive Valerio, your passion and commitment to the art form are obvious and your skills as well.  I only listened to the first movement due to time constraints but I look forward to hearing the complete work since I enjoyed the first movement very much. I liked especially your use of piano, letting it contribute on different levels without dominating as in concerto form. 

I noticed that you listed your interests as micro tonality and minimalism which we don't see here, perhaps those styles are used in the movements I have yet to listen to.   Good work!

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